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Liu Xiaobo And The Nobel Peace Prize: More Readings, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Liu Xiaobo And The Nobel Peace Prize: More Readings

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

It has now been a little more than one month since the announcement of Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Peace Prize win, with the December 10 award ceremony a bit less than a month away. Here are a few links we’ve come across recently in our search for updates on the story:


Buying American, Ron Javers 2010 Ron Javers Worldwide

Buying American, Ron Javers

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

When New York rumors began flying about fresh talks between Newsweek and The Daily Beast over Tina Brown’s taking over the editorship of the venerable but now reeling newsweekly I found myself wondering what Xiang Xi in Guangzhou thought of all that.


Looking At China From Across The Pacific And Across The Himalayas, Jeffrey Wasserstrom 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Looking At China From Across The Pacific And Across The Himalayas, Jeffrey Wasserstrom

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“Wouldn’t it make more sense to focus on Japan?”


Where To Begin: Five (Or More) Books About Daoism, Ian Johnson 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Where To Begin: Five (Or More) Books About Daoism, Ian Johnson

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

With all the attention to Confucius and Confucianism, it is easy to forget how important other philosophical and religious traditions have been in shaping China’s past and influencing its present. Ian Johnson helps rectify this imbalance of coverage with “The Rise of the Tao,” a long essay in the latest issue of the New York Times Sunday Magazine that highlights the significance of the Daoist revival and introduces readers to an abbess who is part of this resurgence of belief. As the very first journalist China Beat ever interviewed for the site (and someone who took part in a ...


In Case You Missed It: Dreaming In Chinese, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham 2010 National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

In Case You Missed It: Dreaming In Chinese, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Each time my three Chinese I classmates and I complained that we had chosen a language that was simply too hard to learn, our professor had an answer at the ready.


New Release: Coming To Terms With The Nation, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

New Release: Coming To Terms With The Nation

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

On Monday, China’s decennial census began, sending six million census workers door-to-door in a quest to record and count the country’s population over the course of only ten days. A key issue in this census, according to some observers, will be placing China’s population in terms of place of residence. One thing analysts are waiting to find out, for example, is how many citizens of the PRC are described as living in cities rather than villages, as this census, which comes after a period of massive rural-to-urban migration, is supposed to describe where people physically live and ...


As China Goes, So Goes The World, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

As China Goes, So Goes The World

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Karl Gerth is a tutor and fellow at Merton College and a historian of modern China at Oxford University. His new book is As China Goes, So Goes the World: How Chinese Consumers are Transforming Everything (Hill & Wang, 2010). (See this review by Christina Larson at the Washington Monthly and this oneat Kirkus Reviews for more on Gerth’s book.) Below, an excerpt from chapter 1 of As China Goes, which takes a look at one of the most notable phenomena of 21st-century Chinese life: the sudden boom in car ownership and its far-reaching consequences.


China Beat Is Heading To The Beach . . ., 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

China Beat Is Heading To The Beach . . .

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

. . . well, not exactly. But we are taking a short vacation, to focus on wrapping up the academic year here at UC Irvine. We’ll be back online June 6 (though we will keep up our Twitter feed during the break, so follow us today!). Before we go, a few links we’d like to share:


Touring With A Book (Vs. Touring With A Band), 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Touring With A Book (Vs. Touring With A Band)

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

My “book tour,” which has had me adding a lot of miles to my frequent flyer account,has finally started winding down. I’ve got some things still to come, including an upcoming event in this area with Ian Johnson in June and then during the summer some book-related talks across the Pacific, including several Shanghai gigs (details to follow in a future post) and a July 24 presentation at the Suzhou branch of the Bookworm bookstore, and so on. Still, the pace has slowed down, which put me in a reflective mood and gave me time to finish writing ...


More On Google + China, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

More On Google + China

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Now that we’ve all had a few days to think deeply about the Google + China story, lots of commentaries and opinion pieces are coming across the wire. Here’s a sampling of those that caught our attention over the weekend:


Travelogue, Delhi-Beijing, Pallavi Aiyar 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Travelogue, Delhi-Beijing, Pallavi Aiyar

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

The plane burps to a halt and almost immediately everyone is on their feet, jostling to open the over-head lockers, reaching high for their strolleys. My head feels stuffed with lead and I marvel at the nimble alacrity of my fellow travellers, at 3:00 in the morning. Slowly we shuffle off the Air China flight and make it into the inadequately-air conditioned environs of Indira Gandhi International Airport.


Five C’S On China, Censorship, And Cyberspace, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Five C’S On China, Censorship, And Cyberspace

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We’re continuing to track the Google and China story, and wanted to call your attention to these particularly good pieces of writing — each of which brought a “c” adjective to mind:


Blogging Aas 2010 (2), William Callahan 2010 University of Manchester

Blogging Aas 2010 (2), William Callahan

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

One of the pleasures of going to a conference is seeing what free goodies you can scam from various institutions. Lots of free pens were proffered by various publishers. A Chinese press was giving out some trinkets — but for some reason not to me. The International Institute for Asian Studies (Leiden) was once again giving out sheer canvas bags loaded with their newsletter and other readable items. UBC Press offered 50-year-old issues of Pacific Affairs for the antiquarians among us, as well as more recent issues.


Blogging Aas 2010, Shellen Xiao Wu, Daniel Little, William A. Callahan 2010 Princeton University

Blogging Aas 2010, Shellen Xiao Wu, Daniel Little, William A. Callahan

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

As many of our readers are already aware, the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting is taking place this weekend in Philadelphia. The largest annual gathering of Asia scholars in the world (this year there will be about three thousand in attendance), the AAS meeting brings together university-based and independent scholars and writers who work in fields ranging from history to political science to literature and studying cultures and countries across Asia.


Google.Cn & Beyond: Politics Of Digital Media, Silvia Lindtner 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Google.Cn & Beyond: Politics Of Digital Media, Silvia Lindtner

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

A bit more than two months ago, on January 12, 2010, Google released an official statement on its corporate blog that described the company’s plan to push back over censorship of search results on Google.cn. The following is an excerpt from that statement, which was inspired in large part by sophisticated cyber attacks against Gmail users that originated from within China:


Capturing Chinese With Help From Lu Xun, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Capturing Chinese With Help From Lu Xun

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We’ve run several posts on Lu Xun at China Beat recently (including this one by Julia Lovell and this one by Sean Macdonald). While Lovell’s new translation of Lu Xun’s stories caters to an Anglophone audience, Kevin Nadolny wanted to create a reader that made Lu Xun more accessible to Chinese-language learners. His new text, Capturing Chinese: Short Stories from Lu Xun’s Nahan, features a fully glossed text of Lu Xun’s short stories so that language learners can focus on reading and comprehension rather than their dictionaries. Here, Kevin answers questions about his motivations for ...


When Skinny Is Too Thin, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

When Skinny Is Too Thin

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Many Taiwanese are becoming increasingly concerned for the health of First Lady Chow Mei-ching 周美青 (Christine Chow Ma), who suffered a spinal injury after being bowled over by a group of overenthusiastic children while visiting a primary school in Pingtung 屏東 County on March 3. She was released from the hospital on March 16, but despite repeated Presidential Office reassurances that the First Lady is in good health doctors have ordered two months of additional bed rest, meaning that she had to miss the opening game of Taiwan’s professional baseball league on March 20 (the First Lady is an ...


Tangka, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Tangka

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“Baimaobar, a Tibetan friend from Qinghai province, poses next to the thangka-esque art he painted on the wall of my Beijing flat in 2008.


The End Of The Revolution: China And The Limits Of Modernity, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The End Of The Revolution: China And The Limits Of Modernity

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

When the Association for Asian Studies meets in Philadelphia later this week, one of the keynote speakers will be Tsinghua University professor and noted public intellectual Wang Hui, whose talk on Saturday evening is free and open to the public. A former editor of Dushu(“Reading”), Wang’s writings include China’s New Order: Society, Politics, and Economy in Transition(Harvard, 2003), as well as a recently released collection of essays, The End of the Revolution: China and the Limits of Modernity (Verso, 2009). Here, we are pleased to share with China Beat readers an excerpt from the English edition ...


A New Book (Almost In The Bookstores) And Some Boston To Boulder Speaking Dates, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

A New Book (Almost In The Bookstores) And Some Boston To Boulder Speaking Dates

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Back when the “China Beat” was in its infancy (figuring that blog years should be reckoned like dog years, it is now solidly in its adolescence), those of us involved in launching it thought that a fair amount of its content might well end up taking the form of “Self-Promotion Saturday” posts (shamelessly touting activities we’d been involved in) or “Coming Distractions” reviews (discussions of books that were about to appear, films that were in the works, upcoming conferences, etc.). Thankfully, the content has turned out to be much more varied, so these two features have only made up ...


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