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Blogging Aas 2010 (5), Miri Kim, Charles Wheeler 2010 University of California, Irvine

Blogging Aas 2010 (5), Miri Kim, Charles Wheeler

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

In this panel, organized by Siyen Fei (University of Pennsylvania), Mark Edward Lewis (Stanford University), Hilde De Weerdt (University of Oxford), and Fei presented papers that creatively engaged the work of G. William Skinner on how to conceptualize empire in time and space. Lewis proposed that the northern capital historically functioned as a peripheral center that connected the agricultural and economic centers found further south with the steppe, and this positioning, a prime concern of the dynasties founded by nomads, helped maintain China as a coherent empire. De Weerdt used social network analysis to mine Song dynastybiji for data that ...


Blogging Aas 2010 (4), Graham Sanders 2010 University of Toronto

Blogging Aas 2010 (4), Graham Sanders

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

This panel attempted to think through a number of issues related to gossip and rumor in traditional China. Paola Zamperini of Amhest College presided over the affair in truly breathtaking Edwardian piratical style. Incisive comments were provided by Robert Hymes of Columbia University. Hymes asked the question of whether or not gossip was normative or subversive, suggesting that there was very little in any of the papers that could be taken as a subversive reading of gossip. Rather, gossip in each case tended to affirm or reaffirm normative social hierarchies and values.


Blogging Aas (3), Miri Kim 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Blogging Aas (3), Miri Kim

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

This intellectually and visually stimulating roundtable was chaired by Carma Hinton (George Mason University) and focused on the legacy of China’s socialist past in China’s not-quite-so socialist present. I’d like to think I took good notes, but this was a session very rich in materials and ideas (and excellently managed time-wise, which means things moved along at a brisk pace), so apologies in advance for any errors or omissions.


Not Aesopian Enough: A Chinese Publishing Fable, James W. Loewen 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Not Aesopian Enough: A Chinese Publishing Fable, James W. Loewen

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

In April 2008, Ma Wanli, a professor of American history at Nanchang Hangkong University in Nanchang, China, emailed me to introduce himself as the translator of the Chinese version of my U.S. best seller, Lies My Teacher Told Me. He also invited me to write a preface for this new edition. I agreed.


The New Red Guards, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The New Red Guards

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“Far out to the East of Beijing, past the city’s fifth ringroad, the Cultural Revolution isn’t over yet.


Notes On The Shanghai Expo, Jonathan Hwang 2010 Hopkins-Nanjing Center

Notes On The Shanghai Expo, Jonathan Hwang

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

1. One of my Chinese classmates mentioned that what really mattered for Chinese visitors were the big exhibitions: Japan, China, Europe, and the US. While still interested in the big exhibits, most Westerners were also astounded by the fact that North Korea and Iran were among the countries with pavilions at the Expo. The pavilions, although far from spectacular, showed a side of the “rogue” nations that is impossible to see in Western media, which often focuses on the proliferation of nuclear weapons and anti-US sentiment. The North Korean Pavilion showed video clips of the Mass Games and random shots ...


What Does China Imagine?, Guangyi Li 2010 University of California, Los Angeles

What Does China Imagine?, Guangyi Li

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

One day when I was four, I found an interesting book on the shelf, called A Strange Patient. This anthology starts with an impressive piece of science fiction,Miracle on the World’s Highest Peak by Ye Yonglie. The story describes an investigation of Mount Everest, where, with some Tibetans’ help, scientists find a precious dinosaur egg embedded in amber and preserved intact over time. Unlike their counterparts in Jurassic Park, however, the Chinese scientists don’t extract dinosaur genes and clone this extinguished species. Instead, they hatch a baby dinosaur!


We’Re Back!, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

We’Re Back!

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We’re returning from a two-week hiatus just in time to call your attention to the final event in a series of author talks that China Beat has produced in cooperation with several other UC Irvine organizations during the 2009-2010 academic year. Tomorrow’s dialogue at UCI, featuring Ian Johnson and Angilee Shah, is free and open to the public (details here).


Wang Hui, Plagiarism, And The Great Bourgeois Academic Cultural Revolution, Susan D. Blum 2010 University of Notre Dame

Wang Hui, Plagiarism, And The Great Bourgeois Academic Cultural Revolution, Susan D. Blum

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Another revolution is afoot in China, and it might even be considered cultural. But this one is about academic culture, as China’s slow-moving iceberg floats up against the glacial mass of “international” (read: Western) principles. The fallout is fascinating for observers, though in some cases tragic for the participants.


Questioning The “Chinese Model Of Development”, Zhansui Yu 2010 University of British Columbia

Questioning The “Chinese Model Of Development”, Zhansui Yu

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Chinese, following Chairman Mao’s famous phrase, tend to use the expression “like a fire burning in the wilderness” [燎原之火 liaoyuan zhi huo] to describe the unexpected rise and popularity of something marginalized or rebellious. Since the literary explosion in the years immediately after Mao’s death, mainland Chinese literary circles have rarely witnessed such a “wild fire.” Recently, however, a fierce literary “fire” suddenly broke out and shocked the entire Chinese intellectual world. The spark that ignited this fire is Chan Koon-chung’s 陈冠中 political novel Shengshi: Zhongguo 2013 [盛世:中国 2013]. [1]


More Questions Than Answers, Michelle Yeh 2010 University of California, Davis

More Questions Than Answers, Michelle Yeh

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Earlier this month, we ran an opinion piece by Peter Zarrow concerning the plagiarism accusations against Tsinghua University Professor Wang Hui, in which Dr. Zarrow explained why he had signed a letter of support organized by international scholars and sent to Tsinghua’s president. The essay was picked up and circulated by the MCLC listserv, where it generated a number of comments. One of the responses came from Michelle Yeh of UC Davis, and we asked Dr. Yeh if she would expand her remarks and share them with China Beat readers. She has done so in the essay below, and ...


R.I.P. China Blogs?, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

R.I.P. China Blogs?

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We were amused to see that the most recent Sinica podcast was ominously titled “Death of the China Blog,” since here at China Beat we feel very much alive. To our relief, however, the discussion (among host Kaiser Kuo, Imagethief’s Will Moss, and Danwei’s Jeremy Goldkorn — who was good enough to do an interview with us last month) ended with the happy conclusion that while the China blogosphere has changed quite a bit in the past few years, it’s still going strong. We heartily agree.


Musings On A Museum: A Trip To Xibaipo, Kenneth Pomeranz 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Musings On A Museum: A Trip To Xibaipo, Kenneth Pomeranz

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

A short trip to China earlier this month took me to Beijing to give a talk, to Shijiazhuang for a conference, and, briefly, to the Hebei countryside — my first time in quite a while in rural North China. And it once again proved that every trip teaches you something, but often not on the expected topics. (One little detail that I found telling: most of the Beijing-based academics who were at the Shijiazhuang conference told me it was their first time there. True, Shijiazhuang is not a tourist hot spot, but it is a provincial capital, with over 2 million ...


Review: China’S Megatrends: The Eight Pillars Of A New Society, William A. Callahan 2010 University of Manchester

Review: China’S Megatrends: The Eight Pillars Of A New Society, William A. Callahan

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

The future is a hot topic in China; bookstores are full of tomes asserting the 21st century as China’s century: Liu Mingfu’s The China Dream(2010) and Chan Koon-chung’s The Gilded Era: China 2013 (2009) are but two of the most recent books that describe how China is destined to become the number one country in the world.


A Coming Sino-U.S. Currency Battle? Obama Speaks Out About The Renminbi, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham 2010 National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

A Coming Sino-U.S. Currency Battle? Obama Speaks Out About The Renminbi, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

On November 19, 2009, I posted a story here at China Beat that I titled “The Good, the Bad, and the Boring.” The article was a review of Barack Obama’s first presidential visit to China, during which he held a somewhat bland town hall meeting in Shanghai, performed the de rigueur tours of the Great Wall and the Forbidden City, and met with Hu Jintao and other Chinese leaders behind closed doors. All in all, Obama’s trip seemed to be little more than an icebreaker, a quick and innocuous introduction to one of America’s most important strategic ...


Liu Xiaobo And The Nobel Peace Prize: More Readings, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Liu Xiaobo And The Nobel Peace Prize: More Readings

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

It has now been a little more than one month since the announcement of Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Peace Prize win, with the December 10 award ceremony a bit less than a month away. Here are a few links we’ve come across recently in our search for updates on the story:


Buying American, Ron Javers 2010 Ron Javers Worldwide

Buying American, Ron Javers

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

When New York rumors began flying about fresh talks between Newsweek and The Daily Beast over Tina Brown’s taking over the editorship of the venerable but now reeling newsweekly I found myself wondering what Xiang Xi in Guangzhou thought of all that.


Looking At China From Across The Pacific And Across The Himalayas, Jeffrey Wasserstrom 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Looking At China From Across The Pacific And Across The Himalayas, Jeffrey Wasserstrom

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“Wouldn’t it make more sense to focus on Japan?”


Where To Begin: Five (Or More) Books About Daoism, Ian Johnson 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Where To Begin: Five (Or More) Books About Daoism, Ian Johnson

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

With all the attention to Confucius and Confucianism, it is easy to forget how important other philosophical and religious traditions have been in shaping China’s past and influencing its present. Ian Johnson helps rectify this imbalance of coverage with “The Rise of the Tao,” a long essay in the latest issue of the New York Times Sunday Magazine that highlights the significance of the Daoist revival and introduces readers to an abbess who is part of this resurgence of belief. As the very first journalist China Beat ever interviewed for the site (and someone who took part in a ...


In Case You Missed It: Dreaming In Chinese, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham 2010 National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

In Case You Missed It: Dreaming In Chinese, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Each time my three Chinese I classmates and I complained that we had chosen a language that was simply too hard to learn, our professor had an answer at the ready.


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