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Blogging Aas 2010 (4), Graham Sanders 2010 University of Toronto

Blogging Aas 2010 (4), Graham Sanders

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

This panel attempted to think through a number of issues related to gossip and rumor in traditional China. Paola Zamperini of Amhest College presided over the affair in truly breathtaking Edwardian piratical style. Incisive comments were provided by Robert Hymes of Columbia University. Hymes asked the question of whether or not gossip was normative or subversive, suggesting that there was very little in any of the papers that could be taken as a subversive reading of gossip. Rather, gossip in each case tended to affirm or reaffirm normative social hierarchies and values.


Blogging Aas (3), Miri Kim 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Blogging Aas (3), Miri Kim

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

This intellectually and visually stimulating roundtable was chaired by Carma Hinton (George Mason University) and focused on the legacy of China’s socialist past in China’s not-quite-so socialist present. I’d like to think I took good notes, but this was a session very rich in materials and ideas (and excellently managed time-wise, which means things moved along at a brisk pace), so apologies in advance for any errors or omissions.


Bloggers’ Breakfast At Aas, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Bloggers’ Breakfast At Aas

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

It’s become a tradition for China Beat contributors and friends of the blog to assemble at the Association for Asian Studies annual meeting (as well as at the American Historical Association’s meeting) for a “bloggers’ breakfast” that provides China Beatniks the chance to get together and meet face-to-face — often for the first time, since so much of our business is conducted via e-mail. Last Saturday morning, we gathered at a Starbucks near the AAS conference site and talked about China, writing, and many other topics over coffee and pastries. A couple of photos from the AAS 2010 bloggers ...


What I Read On My Summer Vacation (Part Ii), Kate Merkel-Hess 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

What I Read On My Summer Vacation (Part Ii), Kate Merkel-Hess

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Moving across the country (from Irvine, California to State College, Pennsylvania) meant that most of my books—even the new ones—spent the summer packed in boxes. But alongside a rapid inhalation of all three Stieg Larsson novels, I still did a little China reading. Here, a few recommendations.


What I Read On My Summer Vacation (Part I), Maura Elizabeth Cunningham 2010 National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

What I Read On My Summer Vacation (Part I), Maura Elizabeth Cunningham

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

As the end of summer vacation quickly draws near, we at The China Beat have been talking about what we read during our break from the academic grind. The summer provides an opportunity to catch up on books we missed, check out some more eclectic choices, and even read ahead when publishers are nice enough to share advance copies of forthcoming titles. Rather than just keep these conversations in-house, we decided to write up short “book reports” on some of the China-related works, both new and old, we’ve been enjoying during these summer months.


If You Can Read Chinese, Read This E-Journal, Xujun Eberlein 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

If You Can Read Chinese, Read This E-Journal, Xujun Eberlein

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

The new issue of Remembrance (<记忆>) continues to review Mao’s Last Revolution (by Roderick MacFarquhar and Michael Schoenhals; Chinese translation can be found here). The four articles in issues 55 and 56 discuss the book from different angles, with thoughtful comments and legitimate questions. All are well worth reading.


Anhui’S Barefoot Aids Doctors, Annie Ye Ren 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Anhui’S Barefoot Aids Doctors, Annie Ye Ren

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

For the past four years, I have periodically worked with a Chinese grassroots HIV/AIDS non-governmental organization (NGO) that serves children in Fuyang Prefecture, Anhui Province. The Fuyang AIDS Orphan Salvation Association (AOS)gives aid directly to local communities, addressing local needs that are often overlooked or underfunded by large-scale government projects.


My Cousin, Zhang Lijia 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

My Cousin, Zhang Lijia

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

My cousin died in Nanjing shortly before his 56th birthday this September, killed by multiple myeloma, a rare and nasty form of blood cancer.


Reading Round-Up: October 31, 2010, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Reading Round-Up: October 31, 2010

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Today’s reading round-up is in a somewhat different format from the one we generally use: instead of just listing links, we’ve first grouped our reading recommendations around two broad topics that have been in the news lately, then included some stand-alone stories at the end.


Why I Support Liu Xiaobo’S Nobel Peace Prize, Wang Chaohua 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Why I Support Liu Xiaobo’S Nobel Peace Prize, Wang Chaohua

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

What does a Nobel Peace Prize stand for politically? We probably can’t take the written words of Alfred Nobel himself and of the awarding committee at face value. In the past century, the prize has stirred up numerous controversies. For example, a war-mongering, coup-conspiring politician like Henry Kissinger was chosen to be honored, leaving the rest of the world with jaws dropped and the winner himself reluctant to revisit the moment in public. After all, the prize was decided and awarded by a committee of five retired politicians. In addition, no matter how politically balanced each of the actual ...


Here, There, And Everywhere: Upcoming Events, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Here, There, And Everywhere: Upcoming Events

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

If you have a bit of free time, check out one of these China-related talks around the world this week and next:


A Tale Of Three Mega-Events, Jeffrey Wasserstrom 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

A Tale Of Three Mega-Events, Jeffrey Wasserstrom

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

What can we learn, about either the People’s Republic of China or India and about what makes the two countries similar to and different from one another, by placing recent mega-events in these two young nation-states side by side? As a China specialist who watched the Beijing Olympics from afar with great interest in 2008, spent a month in Shanghai last summer while it played host to the 2010 World Expo, and is now nearing the end of his first stay in India, which took place in an autumn week that began right after the Commonwealth Games had concluded ...


You Can’T Make An Omelette With Only One Egg, Vignesh Pillai 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

You Can’T Make An Omelette With Only One Egg, Vignesh Pillai

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

In her book Egg on Mao, Denise Chong chronicles the life of Lu Decheng, a seemingly ordinary man who committed the very extraordinary act of vandalizing Mao Zedong’s portrait during the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests. At the heart of the book is an exploration of morality under Communist rule in the Hunanese village of Liuyang, beginning with the lead-up to Lu’s birth in 1963, his formative years, his involvement in the 1989 protests, and his incarceration. Chong draws her narrative both from interviews with Lu, who now lives in Canada, and from interviews she conducted in China in ...


In Search Of Remembrance: Jia Zhangke’S I Wish I Knew, Ken Kwan Ming Hao 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

In Search Of Remembrance: Jia Zhangke’S I Wish I Knew, Ken Kwan Ming Hao

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

In his new film I Wish I Knew, a documentary on Shanghai, Jia Zhangke recreates once again, after a detour of sorts with Useless and24 City, that wonderful tension between the biographical and the historical, the primal impetus of his art, that had made Platform,The World, and Still Life, his best films, so memorable. Jia is different from all other well-known mainland Chinese directors, be they of the 5th or 6th generation — his is a singular sensibility that is aware of but not chained to the social-political, which to him are meaningful only to the extent that they are ...


China, In Dim Light, Pierre Fuller 2010 University of California, Irvine

China, In Dim Light, Pierre Fuller

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

On a train moving across north China last year, a girl, blond hair reaching down to her waist, maybe 15, darted past my bottom perch in the hard sleeper. As much as her hair, it was the colorful ankle-length dress she wore that caught my eye, the kind I’d spotted on girls in places like rural Utah and Nevada. I could have sworn I’d seen an apparition, but settled anyway back into my book.


A Chinese Immigrant Reads Yiyun Li, Xujun Eberlein 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

A Chinese Immigrant Reads Yiyun Li, Xujun Eberlein

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Among the twenty-three people who received MacArthur Fellowships last month was Yiyun Li, a fiction writer based at the University of California, Davis. Born and raised in Beijing before coming to the United States for graduate work (first in immunology, later in creative writing), Li is one member of a growing community of Chinese authors now writing in English. We asked Xujun Eberlein, also part of that group, to reflect on Li’s writing.


Basketbrawls Past And Present, James Carter 2010 Saint Joseph's University

Basketbrawls Past And Present, James Carter

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Many readers have by now heard of the brawl that broke out in the first half of an international basketball match between China and Brazil on October 12 in Henan province. The international “friendly” became increasingly chippy as the Chinese side objected to hard fouls and “dirty” play by the Brazilians. Dissatisfied with the officials’ response, the Chinese team (and its American coach, it should be noted) took matters into its own hands:


Oil, Rentierism And The Arab World, Geoffrey Wilson 2010 Susquehanna University

Oil, Rentierism And The Arab World, Geoffrey Wilson

Susquehanna University Political Review

No abstract provided.


Lessons From The Other Side: What Peacekeeping And Counterinsurgency Can Teach One Another, Andrea M. Lopez 2010 Susquehanna University

Lessons From The Other Side: What Peacekeeping And Counterinsurgency Can Teach One Another, Andrea M. Lopez

Susquehanna University Political Review

No abstract provided.


The Sources Of International Law: Some Philosophical Reflections, David Lefkowitz 2010 University of Richmond

The Sources Of International Law: Some Philosophical Reflections, David Lefkowitz

Philosophy Faculty Publications

It seems only natural to begin the study of international law with a description of its sources. After all, whether as practitioner or scholar a person cannot begin to ask or answer questions about international law until he or she has some sense of what the law is. This requires in turn a basic grasp of the processes whereby international legal norms and regimes come to exist. Thus students of international law must engage immediately with some of the most basic questions in the philosophy of law: what is law, and what is a legal order or system.

These questions ...


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