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Spanish In Contact With Arabic, Lotfi Sayahi 2011 University at Albany, State University of New York

Spanish In Contact With Arabic, Lotfi Sayahi

Languages, Literatures and Cultures Faculty Scholarship

Spanish and Arabic have been in contact for long periods and in different regions. While this is largely due to the geographical proximity of the Iberian Peninsula to western North Africa, a set of historical, political and social developments helped bring both languages into close contact. Of remarkable significance was the presence of Arabic in Iberia from 711 to 1492 and, at least, for several more decades after the Reconquista was completed. This fact, as is often mentioned, led to heavy lexical borrowing from Arabic into Spanish and other Ibero-Romance languages. Also important was the introduction of Spanish into North ...


Effects Of Lexical Class And Word Frequency On The L1 And L2 English-Based Lexical Connections, Alla Zareva 2011 Old Dominion University

Effects Of Lexical Class And Word Frequency On The L1 And L2 English-Based Lexical Connections, Alla Zareva

English Faculty Publications

Three groups of participants—L1 speakers of English, L2 advanced, and intermediate users of English—responded in writing to a word association test containing words balanced for lexical class (nouns, verbs, adjectives) and frequency of occurrence (high, mid, low). The questions addressed in the study concerned the way two word-related factors (i.e., lexical category and word frequency) interplayed with two learner-related characteristics (i.e., proficiency and word familiarity) and influenced 1) the participants’ knowledge of vocabulary, 2) their preference to build specific types of lexical connections among the words they know, and 3) their ability to maintain networks of ...


Una Aproximación Teórica A La Definición Del Modo Verbal Español, David Sánchez-Jiménez 2011 CUNY New York City College of Technology

Una Aproximación Teórica A La Definición Del Modo Verbal Español, David Sánchez-Jiménez

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Base And Suffix Paradigms: Qualitative Evidence Of Emergent Borrowed Suffixes In Multiple Late Middle And Early Modern English Registers, Chris C. Palmer 2010 Kennesaw State University

Base And Suffix Paradigms: Qualitative Evidence Of Emergent Borrowed Suffixes In Multiple Late Middle And Early Modern English Registers, Chris C. Palmer

Chris C. Palmer

Even though many studies of historical morphology have described trends and changes in
the productivity of borrowed suffixes in English, such as -able, -age, -ance, -ity, -cion,
-ment and -ous, few studies have been able to illustrate how borrowed suffixes initially
came to be perceived by speakers as independent, productive units. This study aims to
identify and analyze two types of textual evidence – so-called base paradigms and suffix
paradigms – to demonstrate how and when English writers and readers might have
perceived the endings of borrowings as analyzable, detachable suffixes. Textual examples
are selected from a variety of fourteenth- through sixteenth-century ...


Pausal Phonology And Morpheme Realization, John J. McCarthy 2010 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Pausal Phonology And Morpheme Realization, John J. Mccarthy

John J. McCarthy

Revised December 2009

Classical Arabic has complex phonological alternations affecting words in utterance-final position, traditionally called "pause". All pausal forms end in a heavy syllable, but the ways of achieving this result are both diverse and subject to both phonological and morphological conditioning. This chapter argues that an adequate analysis of Arabic's pausal phonology requires a derivational version of Optimality Theory, called Harmonic Serialism, in which morpheme spell-out is interleaved with phonological processes.


Paradigmatics, Syntagmatics, And The Agglutinative Ideal, Robert Malouf, Farrell Ackerman 2010 San Diego State University

Paradigmatics, Syntagmatics, And The Agglutinative Ideal, Robert Malouf, Farrell Ackerman

Robert Malouf

No abstract provided.


Challenges And Strategies Of Mobile Advertising In India, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr 2010 India Today Group

Challenges And Strategies Of Mobile Advertising In India, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr

Ratnesh Dwivedi

Advertising is paid communication through a medium in which the sponsor is identified and the message is controlled. Every major medium is used to deliver these messages, including: television, radio, movies, magazines, newspapers, the Internet and today’s growing mobile advertising. Advertisements can also be seen on the seats of grocery carts, on the walls of an airport walkway, on the sides of buses, heard in telephone hold messages and instore PA systems but get paid for reading SMS on our mobile phones .It is the new way of marketing strategy for reaching subscribers. Mobile advertising is the business of ...


Changing Mutual Perception Of Television News Viewers And Program Makers In India- A Case Study Of Cnn-Ibn And Its Unique Initiative Of Citizen Journalism, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr 2010 India Today Group

Changing Mutual Perception Of Television News Viewers And Program Makers In India- A Case Study Of Cnn-Ibn And Its Unique Initiative Of Citizen Journalism, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr

Ratnesh Dwivedi

The Indian television system is one of the most extensive systems in the world. Terrestrial broadcasting, which has been the sole preserve of the government, provides television coverage to over 90% of India's 900 million people. By the end of 1996 nearly 50 million households had television sets. International satellite broadcasting, introduced in 1991, has swept across the country because of the rapid proliferation of small scale cable systems. By the end of 1996, Indians could view dozens of foreign and local channels and the competition for audiences and advertising revenues was one of the hottest in the world ...


Community Radio:History,Growth,Challenges And Current Status Of It With Special Reference To India, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr 2010 India Today Group

Community Radio:History,Growth,Challenges And Current Status Of It With Special Reference To India, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr

Ratnesh Dwivedi

Community radio is a type of radio service that caters to the interests of a certain area, broadcasting content that is popular to a local audience but which may often be overlooked by commercial or mass-media broadcasters. Modern-day community radio stations often serve their listeners by offering a variety of content that is not necessarily provided by the larger commercial radio stations. Community radio outlets may carry news and information programming geared toward the local area, particularly immigrant or minority groups that are poorly served by other major media outlets. Philosophically two distinct approaches to community radio can be discerned ...


History Of Communication And Its Application In Multicultaral,Multilingual Social System In India Across Ages, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr 2010 India Today Group

History Of Communication And Its Application In Multicultaral,Multilingual Social System In India Across Ages, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr

Ratnesh Dwivedi

The history of communication dates back to the earliest signs of cavemen.Communication can range from very subtle processes of exchange, to full conversations and mass communication. Human communication was revolutionized with speech perhaps 200,000 years ago, Symbols were developed about 30,000 years ago and writing about 7,000. On a much shorter scale, there have been major developments in the field of telecommunication in the past few centuries.


Paradigmatic Realignment And Morphological Change: Diachronic Deponency In Network Morphology, Andrew R. Hippisley 2010 University of Kentucky

Paradigmatic Realignment And Morphological Change: Diachronic Deponency In Network Morphology, Andrew R. Hippisley

Linguistics Faculty Publications

A natural way of formally modeling language change is to adopt a procedural, dynamic approach that gets at the notion of emergence and decay. We argue that in the realm of morphological change, and notably the reorganization of a lexeme’s paradigm, a model that at a given synchronic stage holds together both the actual facts about the paradigm as well as the range of potential or virtual facts that are licensed by the morphological machinery more elegantly captures the nature of the changing paradigm. We consider the special case of morphological mismatch where syntactic function is misaligned with morphological ...


On The Perceptual Robustness Of Preaspirated Stops [Poster], Ian D. Clayton 2010 University of Nevada, Reno

On The Perceptual Robustness Of Preaspirated Stops [Poster], Ian D. Clayton

Ian D. Clayton

Some phonological patterns are rare crosslinguistically, others commonplace. Rare patterns must be (a) seldom innovated or (b) diachronically unstable. For instance, preaspirated stops occur in < 1% of languages, while postaspirated stops occur in almost 29% (Maddieson 1984). Prevailing explanations have considered only (b), attributing preaspiration’s scarcity to a presumed but unverified perceptual inferiority to postaspiration. Preaspirated stops are hard to hear, it is claimed, thus diachronically unstable (Silverman 2003, Bladon 1986). This study concludes from both experimental and typological evidence that preaspirated stops are better characterized as infrequently innovated but diachronically stable, consistent with Greenberg’s (1978) State-Process model.


Applicative Constructions In Shipibo-Konibo (Panoan), Pilar Valenzuela 2010 Chapman University

Applicative Constructions In Shipibo-Konibo (Panoan), Pilar Valenzuela

World Languages and Cultures Faculty Articles and Research

This article provides a detailed, typologically informed treatment of applicative constructions in Shipibo-Konibo, a Panoan language from Peruvian Amazonia. Shipibo-Konibo has three applicative suffixes: affective (i.e., benefactive or malefactive), dedicated malefactive, and associative. These applicative types are rather common cross-linguistically and hence the language cannot be said to be particularly rich either in terms of number or kinds of applicative constructions. Nevertheless, the Shipibo-Konibo system exhibits certain points of special interest such as the interplay between transitivity and the different applicative construction types, which include a restriction on the dedicated malefactive to combine with transitive verbs only, and the ...


Agreement By Correspondence Without Corr Constraints, John J. McCarthy 2009 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Agreement By Correspondence Without Corr Constraints, John J. Mccarthy

John J. McCarthy

Agreement by correspondence (ABC) is a theory of long-distance assimilation processes proposed in recent work by Hansson and Rose & Walker. This paper presents a refinement of the ABC framework, eliminating the need for Corr constraints, which require correspondence between similar segments.


An Introduction To Harmonic Serialism, John J. McCarthy 2009 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

An Introduction To Harmonic Serialism, John J. Mccarthy

John J. McCarthy

No abstract provided.


Copying Prosodic Constituents, John J. McCarthy, Wendell Kimper, Kevin Mullin 2009 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Copying Prosodic Constituents, John J. Mccarthy, Wendell Kimper, Kevin Mullin

John J. McCarthy

The weight of a syllable-sized reduplicant is never dependent on the syllabification of the base -- that is, no language has a reduplicative morpheme that copies a coda in [pat-pat.ka] but no coda in [pa-pa.ta]. Yet this behavior is attested in the second syllable of foot-sized reduplicants: [pa.ta-pa.ta.ka], [pa.tak-pa.tak.ta]. Why is dependence on base syllabification possible in foot-sized reduplicants, but not in syllable-sized ones?

This article provides an answer to that question in the form of a novel theory of reduplication called Serial Template Satisfaction (STS), which is situated within Harmonic Serialism (a ...


Harmonic Serialism Supplement To Doing Optimality Theory, John J. McCarthy 2009 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Harmonic Serialism Supplement To Doing Optimality Theory, John J. Mccarthy

John J. McCarthy

This document consists of about 30 pages of text to supplement Doing Optimality Theory (Blackwell, 2008).


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