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Recycling Pesticide Containers, Kristine J. P. Schaefer 2019 Iowa State University

Recycling Pesticide Containers, Kristine J. P. Schaefer

Integrated Crop Management News

Handling and disposing of empty pesticide containers is a necessary part of pesticide applications and recycling containers is an environmentally friendly and responsible way of disposing of them. In 2018 763,078 pounds of pesticide containers 55 gallons and smaller were collected and recycled for the state of Iowa. Iowa ranked number one in the Midwest for containers recycled in 2018.


Seedcorn Maggots Flying In Iowa, Erin W. Hodgson 2019 Iowa State University

Seedcorn Maggots Flying In Iowa, Erin W. Hodgson

Integrated Crop Management News

Seedcorn maggot is a seed and seedling pest of corn and soybean. Plant injury is especially prevalent during cool and wet springs. The larvae, or maggots, feed on germinating corn and soybean seeds or seedlings (Photo 1). They can feed on the embryo, delay development or kill the plant. Infestations tend to be field-wide instead of having a patchy distribution like for many other pests. To confirm seedcorn maggot injury, check field areas with stand loss and look for maggots, pupae and damaged seeds (e.g., hollowed out seeds or poorly developing seedlings).


Alfalfa Weevils Active In Northern Iowa, Erin W. Hodgson 2019 Iowa State University

Alfalfa Weevils Active In Northern Iowa, Erin W. Hodgson

Integrated Crop Management News

Keep alfalfa weevils in mind while scouting for stands and evaluating for winter injury. A recent ICM News article gave some great tips for assessing winter injury and providing additional resources. Adult alfalfa weevils become active and start laying eggs as soon as temperatures exceed 48°F. Alfalfa weevil eggs develop based on temperature, or accumulating degree days, and hatching can start around 200-300 degree days. Start scouting alfalfa fields south of Interstate 80 at 200 degree days and fields north of Interstate 80 at 250 degree days. Based on accumulated temperatures since January, weevils could be active throughout southern ...


Late Soybean Planting Options, Mark A. Licht, Ashlyn Kessler, Sotirios Archontoulis 2019 Iowa State University

Late Soybean Planting Options, Mark A. Licht, Ashlyn Kessler, Sotirios Archontoulis

Integrated Crop Management News

This spring's weather conditions may be slowing down corn planting but soybean planting has not yet been impacted. As of May 5, soybean planting progress is estimated at 8% compared to 11% for the 5-year average (USDA-NASS, 2019). However, because of recent rains and corn planting delays there is concern that soybean planting will soon fall behind. In this article, we discuss the soybean yield potential and maturity selection considerations as planting progresses into late May and possibly June.


Scouting For Black Cutworm 2019, Ashley Dean, Erin W. Hodgson, Adam Sisson 2019 Iowa State University

Scouting For Black Cutworm 2019, Ashley Dean, Erin W. Hodgson, Adam Sisson

Integrated Crop Management News

Black cutworm (BCW) is a migratory pest that cuts and feeds on early vegetative-stage corn. Black cutworm moths arrive in Iowa and other northern states with spring storms each year. These moths lay eggs in and around crop fields, and emerging BCW larvae can cut seedling corn. This pest is sporadic, making it essential to scout fields to determine if management is needed. Scouting for BCW larvae helps to determine if an insecticide application will be cost effective. This year, delayed corn planting can coincide with emergence of BCW larvae so scouting should be done early on to protect seedlings ...


Using Drones For Precision Agriculture, Jiyul Chang, Madhav P. Nepal 2019 South Dakota State University

Using Drones For Precision Agriculture, Jiyul Chang, Madhav P. Nepal

Madhav Nepal

In this teaching module, students will learn what Precision Agriculture is and how to apply drone into Precision Agriculture practices. To use data (images) taken by drone, students will learn the basic theory of Remote Sensing. Using images, students learn how to make NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) maps and how to apply drone (remote sensing technique) in agriculture.


Estimate Alfalfa First Crop Harvest With Peaq, Rebecca K. Vittetoe, Brian J. Lang 2019 Iowa State University

Estimate Alfalfa First Crop Harvest With Peaq, Rebecca K. Vittetoe, Brian J. Lang

Integrated Crop Management News

Every spring, alfalfa growth and development is different due to variations in climatic, variety, stand age and other crop production factors. With the 2019 growing season being off to a cooler than normal start, this has slowed alfalfa growth this spring. This is a good reminder that while calendar date may be one method used to determine when to harvest first crop alfalfa, this method is not the best method to use. Instead, the PEAQ method (Predictive Equations for Alfalfa Quality) developed by the University of Wisconsin does a better job.


Another Harsh Winter For Bean Leaf Beetle, Erin W. Hodgson, Adam Sisson 2019 Iowa State University

Another Harsh Winter For Bean Leaf Beetle, Erin W. Hodgson, Adam Sisson

Integrated Crop Management News

Bean leaf beetle adults (Photo 1) are susceptible to cold weather and most will die when air temperatures fall below 14°F (-10°C). However, they have adapted to winter by protecting themselves under plant debris and loose soil. Each spring, adult beetles emerge from overwintering habitat and migrate to available hosts, such as alfalfa, tick trefoil, and various clovers. As the season progresses, bean leaf beetles move to preferred hosts, like soybean. While initial adult activity can begin before soybean emergence, peak abundance often coincides with early-vegetative soybean.


Evaluating Corn Stands, Rebecca K. Vittetoe, Meaghan J. B. Anderson 2019 Iowa State University

Evaluating Corn Stands, Rebecca K. Vittetoe, Meaghan J. B. Anderson

Integrated Crop Management News

As of May 6 2019, 36 percent of Iowa’s corn is planted according to the USDA-NASS. Under cool conditions (50 to 55oF soils), it may take more than three weeks for corn to emerge whereas corn in 70oF soils can emerge in less than a week (Licht et al., 2001). Cool and wet conditions at or around planting delay emergence and provide seedling disease pathogens, like Pythium, a favorable environment and longer time to infect corn seeds or seedlings (Munkvold and White, 2016; Robertson and Munkvold, 2007). The cool and wet conditions could also result ...


Late Corn Planting Options, Mark A. Licht, Mitchell Baum, Sotirios Archontoulis 2019 Iowa State University

Late Corn Planting Options, Mark A. Licht, Mitchell Baum, Sotirios Archontoulis

Integrated Crop Management News

Corn planting began a couple of weeks ago and according to the May 5 USDA-NASS Crop Progress and Condition report only 36 percent of the corn crop is planted; 15 percent behind the 5-year average. The greatest progress has been in central and west central Iowa at 56 percent and 57 percent, respectively. Since May 5 there has been limited opportunity for planting to occur. Current weather forecasts for May 8 to 14 indicate two inches of rain and 20 to 30 lower than normal GDD accumulation across Iowa, which may cause additional planting delays.


Step Two In Flood Recovery Of Pastures Is Renovation, Beth Doran, Joel L. DeJong, Brian J. Lang 2019 Iowa State University

Step Two In Flood Recovery Of Pastures Is Renovation, Beth Doran, Joel L. Dejong, Brian J. Lang

Integrated Crop Management News

As flood waters recede, the renovation of flooded pastures is just beginning. Now is a good time to check pasture plants for survival. Forage production is a function of the plant species, and their density and growth. Evaluate live plants (plant vigor), plant density, and desirable species versus weeds.


Soybean Aphid Egg Hatch Starting In Northern Iowa, Erin W. Hodgson 2019 Iowa State University

Soybean Aphid Egg Hatch Starting In Northern Iowa, Erin W. Hodgson

Integrated Crop Management News

Iowa’s most significant soybean insect pest, soybean aphid, has host-alternating biology. This species has multiple, overlapping generations on soybean in the summer and moves to buckthorn in the winter. Fall migration to buckthorn is based on senescing soybean, and decreasing temperatures and photoperiod. For the majority of the year, soybean aphids are cold-hardy eggs near buckthorn buds (Photo 1). As spring temperatures warm up, soybean aphid eggs hatch and produce a few generations on buckthorn before moving to soybean (Photo 2). Tilmon et al. (2011) goes into more detail about the life cycle and biology of soybean aphid.


What's Behind Iowa's 2019 Soybean Yield Gaps?, Ethan Stoetzer, Mark A. Licht, Daren S. Mueller 2019 Iowa State University

What's Behind Iowa's 2019 Soybean Yield Gaps?, Ethan Stoetzer, Mark A. Licht, Daren S. Mueller

Integrated Crop Management News

Over the last five years, the North Central region of the U.S. has been responsible for 82 percent of the nation’s soybean harvest. Due to the region’s importance to soybean production for its various uses in feed, biodiesel and other widely used products, the North Central Soybean Research Program (NCSRP), through funding from the Soybean Checkoff Program, has sponsored on-farm surveys to farmers in the region to evaluate trends in farming practices and management systems. These responses have helped surveyors develop correlations between total annual yield numbers and particular crop management practices.


Science Communication In Agriculture: The Role Of The Trusted Adviser, Lee Galen Briese 2019 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Science Communication In Agriculture: The Role Of The Trusted Adviser, Lee Galen Briese

Doctoral Documents from Doctor of Plant Health Program

Agronomy is not simply the selling of agricultural products to farmers, nor is it the process of solving singular production problems. Agronomy is defined as the integrated, holistic perspective of agriculture (ASA, 2019) and “agronomists are specialists in crop and soil sciences, as well as ecology” (ASA, 2019). While scientific investigation and discovery are essential to understanding systems function, the tangible benefits from our knowledge stems from the application to solve problems. Clear communication is vital to successfully help stakeholders understand the importance of the science and help scientists understand the challenges stakeholders face. However, to successfully put science into ...


Characterization Of Macrophomina Phaseolina Infecting Chia Plants, Cailyn Sakurai, Hagop S. Atamian, Julien Besnard 2019 Chapman University

Characterization Of Macrophomina Phaseolina Infecting Chia Plants, Cailyn Sakurai, Hagop S. Atamian, Julien Besnard

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

Microbial organisms have caused detrimental effects to agricultural plants by significantly decreasing their plant growth yield and it’s nutritional qualities, leading to high levels of economic losses in society. Salvia Hispanica L., commonly known as chia, is becoming a rising agricultural crop because of its favorable nutritional qualities. Chia seeds have a high concentration of α-linolenic acid, commonly known as omega-3 fatty acids) which provide several different health benefits, in addition to being a rich source of protein and fiber. Chia field trial conducted by the Atamian lab during summer 2018, experienced high levels of disease incidence characterized by ...


Effect Of Soil-Applied Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitor Herbicides On Soybean Seedling Disease, Nicholas J. Arneson 2019 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Effect Of Soil-Applied Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitor Herbicides On Soybean Seedling Disease, Nicholas J. Arneson

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Seedling disease is one the most economically important diseases of soybean in the United States. It is commonly caused by Fusarium spp., Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium spp., and Phytophthora sojae, alone, or together as a disease complex. Fungicide seed treatments continue to provide the most consistent management of seedling diseases. Soil-applied protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) inhibitor herbicides are used preemergence in soybean production to manage several broadleaf weeds. Applications of PPO-inhibitors can result in phytotoxic injury to soybean when environmental conditions are not favorable for soybean growth. These environmental conditions can favor seedling disease development as well. In this thesis, two studies ...


Use Of Annual Forage Mixtures In Crop/Livestock Production Systems In Nebraska, Nathan Paul Pflueger 2019 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Use Of Annual Forage Mixtures In Crop/Livestock Production Systems In Nebraska, Nathan Paul Pflueger

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Success of integrating annual forages into crop and livestock systems throughout Nebraska may be variable depending on field location, field/forage crop management, and precipitation. There are many different warm- and cool-season annual forage species available for integrating crop and livestock systems at different times of the year. Mixtures of cereal species, such as oats (Avena sativa)) and spring peas (Pisum sativum)), are often used to optimize forage quantity and forage quality. Our two-year, three location study across Nebraska’s precipitation gradient suggested that forage quantity and quality may vary by location due to different precipitation amounts received during the ...


Establishment Of Perennial Legumes With An Annual Warm-Season Grass As A Companion Crop, Martina N. La Vallie 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Establishment Of Perennial Legumes With An Annual Warm-Season Grass As A Companion Crop, Martina N. La Vallie

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

The yields of perennial forage legumes are often hindered during the establishment year due to slow germination rates and weed competition. This study was conducted to determine if sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanese) is a compatible annual companion crop for increased forage production, weed suppression, and legume establishment. In 2016, sorghum-sudangrass was paired with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. ‘Ranger’), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.), Illinois bundleflower [Desmanthus illinoensis (Michx.) MacMill. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald], purple prairie clover (Dalea purpurea Vent.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and roundhead lespedeza (Lespedeza capitata Michx.). We studied effects of a sorghum-sudangrass companion crop with a varying number of harvests (three vs. four harvests) collected per plot throughout the summer and compared yields to the yield of a weeded legume treatment, and a non-weeded legume treatment. In 2017, we studied effects of the application of four seeding rates for sorghum-sudangrass at 5 pure live seed per m2 (PLS/m2), 10 PLS/m2, 20 PLS/m2, and 40 PLS/m2 paired with only the alfalfa perennial legume and compared yields to the yield of an oat-alfalfa control treatment, a weeded alfalfa treatment, and a non-weeded alfalfa treatment. Total dry matter yields along with the yield of each legume, weeds, sorghum-sudangrass, and oats (second year only) were collected for each treatment. In both years, we found the addition of sorghum-sudangrass increased overall dry matter yield and significantly decreased weed abundance. The increase in total dry matter yield came at a cost to the legume yield; as treatments planted with sorghum-sudangrass or oats had lower legume/alfalfa yields than weeded legume/alfalfa treatments. These results suggest that sorghum-sudangrass is ...


Integrated Management Of Phytophthora Stem And Root Rot Of Soybean And The Effect Of Soil-Applied Herbicides On Seedling Disease Incidence, Vinicius Castelli Garnica 2019 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Integrated Management Of Phytophthora Stem And Root Rot Of Soybean And The Effect Of Soil-Applied Herbicides On Seedling Disease Incidence, Vinicius Castelli Garnica

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Soybean seedling diseases and Phytophthora stem and root rot (PSRR; caused by Phytophthora sojae) are two of the most economically important diseases in North Central U.S. Remarkable differences in disease incidence occur each year, which demonstrate that abiotic and biotic factors must interact for disease onset and development. During 2017 and 2018, field studies were conducted to (i) address the efficacy of seed treatment and genetic resistance for PSRR management on soybean population, canopy coverage (CC), and yield, and (ii) investigate potential interactions between pre-emergence (PRE) herbicides and the incidence of seedling diseases in alluvial soils in Nebraska.

Despite ...


Dna Barcoding Of Pratylenchus From Agroecosystems In The Northern Great Plains Of North America, Mehmet Ozbayrak 2019 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Dna Barcoding Of Pratylenchus From Agroecosystems In The Northern Great Plains Of North America, Mehmet Ozbayrak

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Pratylenchus species are among the most common plant parasitic nematodes in the Great Plains Region. The objectives of this study were to barcode Pratylenchus specimens for species identification in the Great Plains region using mitochondrial CO1 DNA barcode. In order to (1) determine species boundaries, (2) assess the host associations of barcoded Pratylenchus, (3) to determine the distribution patterns across the Great Plains Region and, (4) to evaluate the species status of P. scribneri and P. hexincisus by a multivariate morphological analysis of haplotype groups identified by DNA barcoding. Soil samples, primarily associated with eight major crops, were collected from ...


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