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Vertical Power, Michael S. Green 2019 William & Mary Law School

Vertical Power, Michael S. Green

Michael S. Green

Many legal scholars and federal judges - including Justices Ginsburg and Scalia - have implicitly assumed that a state can extend its procedural law solely to federal courts within its borders. To date, however, no one has identified this assumption, much less defended it. Drawing upon an example discussed by Chief Justice Marshall in Wayman v. Southard, 23 U.S. (10 Wheat.) 1 (1825), 1 argue that such vertical power does not exist. Not only do states lack a legitimate interest in extending their law vertically, a state's assertion of vertical power would improperly discriminate against federal courts. If state law ...


Georgia And State Research Resources, Pamela C. Brannon 2019 Georgia State University College of Law

Georgia And State Research Resources, Pamela C. Brannon

Pamela Brannon

Shares a variety of websites for gathering the state of Georgia and other state information from for legal research.


Inferiority Complex: Should State Courts Follow Lower Federal Court Precedent On The Meaning Of Federal Law?, Amanda Frost 2019 Selected Works

Inferiority Complex: Should State Courts Follow Lower Federal Court Precedent On The Meaning Of Federal Law?, Amanda Frost

Amanda Frost

The conventional wisdom is that state courts need not follow lower federal court precedent when interpreting federal law. Upon closer inspection, however, the question of how state courts should treat lower federal court precedent is not so clear. Although most state courts now take the conventional approach, a few contend that they are obligated to follow the lower federal courts, and two federal courts of appeals have declared that their decisions are binding on state courts. The Constitution's text and structure send mixed messages about the relationship between state and lower federal courts, and the Supreme Court has never ...


Mandatory Legal Malpractice Insurance: Exposing Lawyers' Blind Spots, Susan S. Fortney 2019 Texas A&M University School of Law

Mandatory Legal Malpractice Insurance: Exposing Lawyers' Blind Spots, Susan S. Fortney

Susan S. Fortney

The legal landscape for lawyers’ professional liability in the United States is changing. In 2018, Idaho implemented a new rule requiring that lawyers carry legal malpractice insurance. The adoption of the Idaho rule was the first move in forty years by a state to require legal malpractice insurance since Oregon mandated lawyer participation in a malpractice insurance regime. Over the last two years, a few states have considered whether their jurisdictions should join Oregon and Idaho in requiring malpractice insurance for lawyers in private practice. To help inform the discussion, the article examines different positions taken in the debate on ...


The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend And Membership In The State's Political Community, Christopher L. Griffin Jr. 2019 William & Mary Law School

The Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend And Membership In The State's Political Community, Christopher L. Griffin Jr.

Christopher L. Griffin Jr.

Despite decades of unmitigated administrative success, the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) is not immune from political and legal controversy. The symbolic and financial importance that Alaskans ascribe to their annual dividend checks has generated disputes between ordinary residents and executive agencies over eligibility. Litigation concerning three dominant status requirements - minimum residency, U.S. citizenship, and felony incarceration - reveal not only the extent to which Alaskans will pursue what they believe to be valid claims on their share of natural resource wealth, but also the limits of full political membership in the state. This Comment frames a sample of the ...


Book 1, John N. Jacob 2019 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Book 1, John N. Jacob

Newton D. Baker Scrapbooks

No abstract provided.


The Character Of Law: A Normative Critique Of Social-Emotional Learning Laws, Meredith R. Aska McBride 2019 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

The Character Of Law: A Normative Critique Of Social-Emotional Learning Laws, Meredith R. Aska Mcbride

Northwestern University Law Review

This Note examines a widespread but barely acknowledged phenomenon within education law: the recent enactment, in all fifty states, of statutes and standards regarding students’ social and emotional learning within public schools. Despite significant empirical evidence that curricular and disciplinary interventions targeting students’ social and emotional skills are effective at building these skills and, in turn, enhancing students’ academic and long-term outcomes, this Note argues that social and emotional learning should not be legislated. Drawing on James Scott’s seminal critique of processes of state rationalization and Jal Mehta’s application of this critique to education policy, this Note shows ...


Forgotten Limits On The Power To Amend State Constitutions, Jonathan L. Marshfield 2019 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Forgotten Limits On The Power To Amend State Constitutions, Jonathan L. Marshfield

Northwestern University Law Review

There seem to be no limits on what can pass through state constitutional amendment procedures. State amendments have targeted vulnerable minorities, deeply entrenched specific fiscal strategies, and profoundly restructured institutions. The malleability of state constitutions is significant because in many states there are legitimate fears that special interests dominate amendment politics, and that fundamental change is occurring with minimal opportunities for constructive deliberation or inclusive participation. The state doctrine of “referendum sovereignty” is a key condition fueling this dynamic. The doctrine holds that there are no substantive limits on any state amendment processes so long as amendments comply with federal ...


Rethinking Police Rulemaking, Maria Ponomarenko 2019 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Rethinking Police Rulemaking, Maria Ponomarenko

Northwestern University Law Review

For more than sixty years, prominent policing scholars have argued that the way to address the many problems of policing is to treat police departments like all other agencies of government—and to require that they set policy through something like notice-and-comment rulemaking. This paper argues that despite its intuitive appeal, rulemaking is not a particularly apt solution to policing’s various ills. Although policing scholars have been right to look to administrative law for ideas on how to govern policing, they have been focused on the wrong set of administrative tools. Instead of looking to the public to regulate ...


Deceptively Simple: The Arkansas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, Margaret E. Rushing 2019 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Deceptively Simple: The Arkansas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, Margaret E. Rushing

Arkansas Law Review

In the 2017 legislative session, the Arkansas General Assembly significantly changed the Arkansas Deceptive Trade Practices Act (“ADTPA”). These changes now prohibit private class actions under the ADTPA and require plaintiffs to prove additional elements of reliance and actual financial loss when bringing a claim. The changes appear to limit the ability of a consumer to bring a private action under the ADPTA. With these changes, Arkansas joins a minority of jurisdictions with deceptive trade practices acts that increase a plaintiff’s burden and restrict private class actions.


Revamping The Right To Be Informed: Protecting Consumers Under New Jersey's Truth-In-Consumer Contract, Warranty, And Notice Act*, Jessica Guarino 2019 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Revamping The Right To Be Informed: Protecting Consumers Under New Jersey's Truth-In-Consumer Contract, Warranty, And Notice Act*, Jessica Guarino

Arkansas Law Review

Prior to the 1960s, “courts were notorious for their insensitivity to consumer interests, while legislatures did little in the way of offering the consumer comprehensive protection against business fraud.”1 However, the tide of legislation began to turn in the 1960s as a movement for greater consumer protections finally reached the ears of an individual with a powerful voice: President John F. Kennedy.


"Body" Building: Expanding Arkansas's Standard For Holographic Wills, Andrew L. Lawson 2019 Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP

"Body" Building: Expanding Arkansas's Standard For Holographic Wills, Andrew L. Lawson

Arkansas Law Review

In times past, entirely handwritten documents represented the vast majority of holographic wills. These homemade testaments included dense pages of text that the drafter diligently memorialized by hand, carefully crafted letters with testamentary directions to the author’s loved ones, and unassuming notes tucked away in a drawer, perhaps with names, proportions, and shorthand property descriptions. If a probate court encountered a holographic testament, odds were that it resembled these traditional examples.


Administrative Balance, David Russell 2019 Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP

Administrative Balance, David Russell

Arkansas Law Review

Two of the most discussed administrative-law theories in contemporary discussion are executive preemption and big waiver. Executive preemption is the idea that agency regulations preempt state law by extension of the federal statutes the agencies are charged with enforcing. Big waiver is the idea that Congress delegates, to administrative agencies, the power to waive statutory provisions. The constitutional questions raised by executive preemption and big waiver can be put in the following terms. Executive preemption raises constitutional issues as regulatory agencies go farther and farther away from the “clear statement” of a given statute. Thus, one wonders whether agencies are ...


Appeal No. 0965: Brookfield Citizens Against Injection Wells, Et Al. V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management And Highland Field Services, Llc, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission 2019 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Appeal No. 0965: Brookfield Citizens Against Injection Wells, Et Al. V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management And Highland Field Services, Llc, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission

Ohio Oil & Gas Commission Decisions

Review of Chief's Order 2018-286; Highland Brookfield Well #5 (Highland Field Services, LLC)


Appeal No. 974: L.D. Jenkins V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission 2019 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Appeal No. 974: L.D. Jenkins V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission

Ohio Oil & Gas Commission Decisions

Review of Chief's Orders 2019-69 & 2019-77; Smith East Unit & Smith Unit (Chesapeake Exploration)


Appeal No. 0950: General Electric Company V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission 2019 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Appeal No. 0950: General Electric Company V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission

Ohio Oil & Gas Commission Decisions

Review of Chief's Order 2017-347


Appeal No. 0973: L.D. Jenkins V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission 2019 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Appeal No. 0973: L.D. Jenkins V. Division Of Oil & Gas Resources Management, Ohio Oil & Gas Commission

Ohio Oil & Gas Commission Decisions

Review of Chief's Orders 2019-69 & 2019-77; Smith East Unit & Smith Unit (Chesapeake Exploration)


Who Takes A Dam: Regulatory Confusion And Surging Opportunities For Small Dam Removal In Rural Maine, Grady R. Burns 2019 University of Maine School of Law

Who Takes A Dam: Regulatory Confusion And Surging Opportunities For Small Dam Removal In Rural Maine, Grady R. Burns

Maine Law Review

This Comment examines the regulatory regimes surrounding the removal of state-regulated small dams in Maine by comparing the relatively underdeveloped regime in Maine with the much more coherent and robust regime in neighboring New Hampshire. When compared to more deliberate regimes, Maine’s system lacks key features, including a streamlined permitting program and a single clearinghouse for information, resources, and regulatory enforcement. Given the significant opportunities afforded by a coherent regulatory small dam removal regime, this Comment recommends that Maine follow the example of other states by creating a river restoration and dam removal program, re-establishing its statewide dam inventory ...


The Short-Term Rental Economy In Rural Maine Communities: An Opportunity For Economic Growth Instead Of A Target For Regulation, Nicholas E. Anania 2019 University of Maine School of Law

The Short-Term Rental Economy In Rural Maine Communities: An Opportunity For Economic Growth Instead Of A Target For Regulation, Nicholas E. Anania

Maine Law Review

State and local governments across the country are grappling with the rise of short-term housing rentals and how to enact effective regulation regarding their use. The increase of short-term rentals (STRs) is almost entirely the result of online platforms that make STRs easy, efficient, and accessible. While STRs undoubtedly have positive economic outcomes for both property owners and local economies, there are also many negative repercussions which must be effectively regulated. Regulation in this area reflects differing priorities and viewpoints of states and municipalities. Specifically, rural Maine municipalities, many of which are popular seasonal destinations, face not only the challenges ...


Conservation, Regionality, And The Farm Bill, Jess R. Phelps 2019 University of Maine School of Law

Conservation, Regionality, And The Farm Bill, Jess R. Phelps

Maine Law Review

Over the past several Farm Bills, there has been a somewhat subtle shift in program design to better incorporate regional perspectives/localized areas of conservation concern into national conservation program delivery. The purpose of this Article is to specifically explore the various roles that regional considerations play in existing Farm Bill conservation programs and also consider whether further developments in this direction could result in more flexible program delivery, more effective partnerships, and ultimately, better conservation outcomes. To this end, section II will provide an overview of the history of the Farm Bill, from its origins to the emergence of ...


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