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The Internet Adopts Two-Way Radio, Henry H. Perritt Jr. 2019 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

The Internet Adopts Two-Way Radio, Henry H. Perritt Jr.

Hastings Science and Technology Law Journal

The Internet, having displaced conventional correspondence with email, having displaced traditional libraries with online ones, having revolutionized shopping, having uprooted television and movies, now is absorbing police, fire, ambulance, and public utility two-radio systems.

Digital radio technologies combine with Internet switching of transmitters, receivers, and networks, so that a police officer can talk to an ambulance driver or a train dispatcher across the state or across the country. Specialized cellphones are becoming indistinguishable from walkie-talkies. Cellular telephone channels replace two-way-radio air links.

Integration of “private mobile radio” into the Internet is the result of specific advances in radio and networking ...


Can A Distant Relative Allow The Government Access To Your Dna? The Fourth Amendment Implications Of Law Enforcement’S Genealogical Search For The Golden State Killer And Other Genetic Genealogy Investigations, George M. Dery III 2019 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Can A Distant Relative Allow The Government Access To Your Dna? The Fourth Amendment Implications Of Law Enforcement’S Genealogical Search For The Golden State Killer And Other Genetic Genealogy Investigations, George M. Dery Iii

Hastings Science and Technology Law Journal

This Article considers the advent of genetic genealogy, used by law enforcement in capturing the Golden State Killer suspect and in other cold cases. In these investigations, police used genetic information obtained from the open source genealogy site, GEDmatch, to build vast family trees spanning the entire country and several generations in order to locate suspects whose DNA matched that left at a crime scene. This Article analyzes the Fourth Amendment implications of government use of such powerful technology to explore such sensitive information as DNA. The conclusion the Supreme Court could reach, should it be called upon to examine ...


Masthead, 2019 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Masthead

Hastings Science and Technology Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Heavy Burden Of A Lighter Touch Framework The Inadequacy Of Antitrust Laws As A Substitute For Net Neutrality, Emilia R. Rubin 2019 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

The Heavy Burden Of A Lighter Touch Framework The Inadequacy Of Antitrust Laws As A Substitute For Net Neutrality, Emilia R. Rubin

Hastings Science and Technology Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Financial Conflicts Of Interest In Human Subjects Research: Proposals For A More Effective Regulatory Scheme, Karen A. Jordan 2019 Selected Works

Financial Conflicts Of Interest In Human Subjects Research: Proposals For A More Effective Regulatory Scheme, Karen A. Jordan

Karen A. Jordan

No abstract provided.


Juliana V. United States, Daniel Brister 2019 University of Montana School of Law

Juliana V. United States, Daniel Brister

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In 2015, a group of adolescents between the ages of eight and nineteen filed a lawsuit against the federal government for infringing upon their civil rights to a healthy, habitable future living environment. Those Plaintiffs in Juliana v. United States alleged that the industrial-scale burning of fossil fuels was causing catastrophic and destabilizing impacts to the global climate, threatening the survival and welfare of present and future generations. Seeking to reduce the United States’ contributions to atmospheric carbon dioxide, Plaintiffs demanded injunctive and declaratory relief to halt the federal government’s policies of promoting and subsidizing fossil fuels, due to ...


Grants, Nicholson Price II 2019 University of Michigan Law School

Grants, Nicholson Price Ii

Articles

Innovation is a primary source of economic growth and is accordingly the target of substantial academic and government attention. Grants are a key tool in the government’s arsenal to promote innovation, but legal academic studies of that arsenal have given them short shrift. Although patents, prizes, and regulator-enforced exclusivity are each the subject of substantial literature, grants are typically addressed briefly, if at all. According to the conventional story, grants may be the only feasible tool to drive basic research, as opposed to applied research, but they are a blunt tool for that task. Three critiques of grants underlie ...


Guilt By Genetic Association: The Fourth Amendment And The Search Of Private Genetic Databases By Law Enforcement, Claire Abrahamson 2019 Fordham University School of Law

Guilt By Genetic Association: The Fourth Amendment And The Search Of Private Genetic Databases By Law Enforcement, Claire Abrahamson

Fordham Law Review

Over the course of 2018, a number of suspects in unsolved crimes have been identified through the use of GEDMatch, a public online genetic database. Law enforcement’s use of GEDMatch to identify suspects in cold cases likely does not constitute a search under the Fourth Amendment because the genetic information hosted on the website is publicly available. Transparency reports from direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing providers like 23andMe and Ancestry suggest that federal and state officials may now be requesting access to private genetic databases as well. Whether law enforcement’s use of private DTC genetic databases to search for ...


Carpenter's Legacy: Limiting The Scope Of The Electronic Private Search Doctrine, Sarah A. Mezera 2019 University of Michigan Law School

Carpenter's Legacy: Limiting The Scope Of The Electronic Private Search Doctrine, Sarah A. Mezera

Michigan Law Review

One of the most significant challenges confronting courts and legal scholars in the twenty-first century is the application of Fourth Amendment doctrine to new technology. The circuit split over the application of the private search doctrine to electronic devices exemplifies how courts struggle to apply old doctrines to new circumstances. Some courts take the position that the old doctrine should apply consistently in the new context. Other courts have changed the scope of the old doctrine in order to account for the change in circumstances. The Supreme Court took the latter position in Carpenter v. United States and held that ...


The Gdpr: It Came, We Saw, But Did It Conquer?, Leila Javanshir 2019 Seattle University School of Law

The Gdpr: It Came, We Saw, But Did It Conquer?, Leila Javanshir

Seattle University Law Review

On February 1, 2019, the Seattle University Law Review held its annual symposium at the Seattle University School of Law. Each year, the Law Review hosts its symposium on a topic that is timely and meaningful. This year, privacy and data security professionals from around the globe gathered to discuss the current and future effects of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that was implemented on May 25, 2018. The articles and essays that follow this Foreword are the product of this year’s symposium.


Regulating The Gdpr: Perspectives From The United Kingdom, Hannah McCausland 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Regulating The Gdpr: Perspectives From The United Kingdom, Hannah Mccausland

Seattle University Law Review

Hannah McCausland leads the international group at the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). The ICO’s International Engagement functions as the gateway to other data protection and privacy authorities on international matters. She’s involved in the work of the EU European Data Protection Board advising the commissioner and the deputy commissioner on international positioning of the ICO, and she has played a key role over the past six years in the ICO’s strategy on navigating the EU’s data protection framework. Hannah has also played a major role at the global level and advancing the practical tools ...


Privacy, Freedom, And Technology—Or “How Did We Get Into This Mess?”, Alex Alben 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Privacy, Freedom, And Technology—Or “How Did We Get Into This Mess?”, Alex Alben

Seattle University Law Review

Can we live in a free society without personal privacy? The question is worth pondering, not only in light of the ongoing debate about government surveillance of private communications, but also because new technologies continue to erode the boundaries of our personal space. This Article examines our loss of freedom in a variety of disparate contexts, all connected by the thread of erosion of personal privacy. In the scenarios explored here, privacy reducing activities vary from government surveillance, personal stalking conducted by individuals, and profiling by data-driven corporations, to political actors manipulating social media platforms. In each case, new technologies ...


Confiding In Con Men: U.S. Privacy Law, The Gdpr, And Information Fiduciaries, Lindsey Barrett 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Confiding In Con Men: U.S. Privacy Law, The Gdpr, And Information Fiduciaries, Lindsey Barrett

Seattle University Law Review

In scope, ambition, and animating philosophy, U.S. privacy law and Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation are almost diametric opposites. The GDPR’s ambitious individual rights, significant prohibitions, substantive enforcement regime, and broad applicability contrast vividly with a scattershot U.S. regime that generally prioritizes facilitating commerce over protecting individuals, and which has created perverse incentives for industry through anemic enforcement of the few meaningful limitations that do exist. A privacy law that characterizes data collectors as information fiduciaries could coalesce with the commercial focus of U.S. law, while emulating the GDPR’s laudable normative objectives and fortifying ...


General Data Protection Regulation (Gdpr): Prioritizing Resources, Jennifer Dumas 2019 Seattle University School of Law

General Data Protection Regulation (Gdpr): Prioritizing Resources, Jennifer Dumas

Seattle University Law Review

This Article will discuss and analyze the years of preparation for the GDPR and provide recommendations for dealing with the GDPR forevermore. It will assess whether the preparation and panic were worth it. In other words, was the time, expense, and distraction my peers and I expended and experienced over the past years proportionate to the requirements and impact of the GDPR? Further, was the high level of preparation and panic many legal departments in countless companies undertook and experienced appropriate now that we have had a chance to see the initial impact of the GDPR?


Privacy Statements Under The Gdpr, Mike Hintze 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Privacy Statements Under The Gdpr, Mike Hintze

Seattle University Law Review

The need to include specific types of information in a privacy statement is a GDPR compliance obligation that does not get as much attention as some other GDPR requirements. Perhaps that is because privacy statements have been much maligned in recent years. They are too long and full of legalese. Nobody reads them. They are part of a notice and consent approach to privacy that puts an unrealistic burden on consumers to make informed choices. But despite these well-known criticisms, the GDPR doubles down on privacy statements. In fact, gauging by the roughly fourfold increase in privacy statement requirements compared ...


Gdpr Compliance—It Takes A Village, Susy Mendoza 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Gdpr Compliance—It Takes A Village, Susy Mendoza

Seattle University Law Review

When the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect in May of 2018, many legal departments were confronted with the gravity of just how they were going to comply with such a wide-reaching law. If you have international customers (both direct to consumer or business to business), it is not hard to convince your general counsel that compliance with the GDPR is a must. You may even be able to get the chief technical officer (CTO) or chief operating officer (COO) onboard just by mentioning the steep fines—two to four percent of worldwide gross revenue. But how does ...


Requiem For Cyberspace: The Effect Of The European General Privacy Regulation On The Global Internet, Steven Tapia 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Requiem For Cyberspace: The Effect Of The European General Privacy Regulation On The Global Internet, Steven Tapia

Seattle University Law Review

The dream of a perpetual, limitless, non-dimensional space is an idea that has transfixed clergy, philosophers, and poets for ages. Whether it is called “heaven,” “the afterlife,” “nirvana,” or another linguistic stand-in, the dream of a dimension beyond the bounds of time, space, and the laws of nature seems as universal as any concept ever. From its initial development in the 1970s (as a military, academic, and governmental experiment in creating a wholly alternative means of communication capable of surviving catastrophic failures of any parts of the communications conduits) until essentially now, the Internet seemed to be the closest incarnate ...


Footprints: Privacy For Enterprises, Processors, And Custodians…Oh My!, Blair Witzel, Carrie Mount 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Footprints: Privacy For Enterprises, Processors, And Custodians…Oh My!, Blair Witzel, Carrie Mount

Seattle University Law Review

Americans’ interest in privacy—as evidenced by increasing news coverage, online searches, and new legislation—has grown over the past decade. After the European Union enacted the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), technologists and legal professionals have focused on primary collectors of data—known under various legal regimes as the “controller” or “custodian.” Thanks to advances in computing, many of these data collectors offload the processing of data to third parties providing data-related cloud services like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. In addition to the data they have already collected about the data subjects themselves, these companies now “hold” that data ...


Non-Autonomous Artificial Intelligence Programs And Products Liability: How New Ai Products Challenge Existing Liability Models And Pose New Financial Burdens, Greg Swanson 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Non-Autonomous Artificial Intelligence Programs And Products Liability: How New Ai Products Challenge Existing Liability Models And Pose New Financial Burdens, Greg Swanson

Seattle University Law Review

This Comment argues that the unique relationship between manufacturers, consumers, and their reinforcement learning AI systems challenges existing products liability law models. These traditional models inform how to identify and apportion liability between manufacturers and consumers while exposing litigants to low-dollar tort remedies with inherently high-dollar litigation costs.11 Rather than waiting for AI autonomy, the political and legal communities should be proactive and generate a liability model that recognizes how new AI programs have already redefined the relationship between manufacturer, consumer, and product while challenging the legal and financial burden of prospective consumer-plaintiffs and manufacturer-defendants.


The Law Of Attribution: Rules For Attribution The Source Of A Cyber-Attack, Delbert Tran 2019 Yale Law School

The Law Of Attribution: Rules For Attribution The Source Of A Cyber-Attack, Delbert Tran

Yale Journal of Law and Technology

State-sponsored cyber-attacks are on the rise and show no signs of abating. Despite the threats posed by these attacks, the states responsible frequently escape with impunity because of the difficulty in attributing cyber-attacks to their source. As a result, current scholarship has focused almost exclusively on overcoming the technological barriers to attribution.


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