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Small Crimes, Big Injustices, Stephanos Bibas 2019 United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit

Small Crimes, Big Injustices, Stephanos Bibas

Michigan Law Review

Review of Alexandra Natapoff's Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal.


International Criminal Responsibility In Kosovo: Establishment Of The International Criminal Court – De Lege Lata, De Lege Ferenda, Mujë Ukaj, Qendresa Jasharaj 2019 University of Haxhi Zeka

International Criminal Responsibility In Kosovo: Establishment Of The International Criminal Court – De Lege Lata, De Lege Ferenda, Mujë Ukaj, Qendresa Jasharaj

International Journal on Responsibility

The Special Court of Kosovo (Kosovo Specialist Chambers and Specialist Prosecutor's Office) with headquarters in The Hague, is one of the biggest problems Kosovo faced since the declaration of independence. This topic has been treated very little in scientific terms, while in the media it is written very much, calling it harmful to Kosovo, and even had opinions that it is a racist court since the same will initially only judge the KLA (Kosovo Liberation Army) members for alleged war crimes in Kosovo. The Special Court of Kosovo is presented as a sui generis case in the practice of ...


Why Consumer Defendants Lump It, Emily S. Taylor Poppe 2019 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Why Consumer Defendants Lump It, Emily S. Taylor Poppe

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


Filling The Sex Trade Swamp: Robert Kraft And His Predecessors, Janice G. Raymond 2019 University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Filling The Sex Trade Swamp: Robert Kraft And His Predecessors, Janice G. Raymond

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judging Well, Francis J. Mootz III 2019 University of the Pacific

Judging Well, Francis J. Mootz Iii

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Can judges interpret the law in a manner that is objectively verifiable, or do judges necessarily – even if unconsciously – inject their own predispositions and biases into their decisions? It is difficult to decide whether such a question is frivolous in the post-Realist age, or whether it is the is the single most important question that we can ask about our legal system. I endorse both responses. The question, as phrased, is both vitally important and unanswerable on its own terms. Rather than seeking an elusive objective standard by which to measure the correctness of “a judgment,” I argue that we ...


Against Life Without Parole, Judith Lichtenberg 2019 Georgetown University

Against Life Without Parole, Judith Lichtenberg

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

We have many good reasons to abolish life without parole sentences (LWOP, known in some countries as whole life sentences) and no good reasons not to. After reviewing the current state of LWOP sentences in the United States, I argue that the only rationale for punishment that can hope to justify them is retributivism. But even if retributivism is a sound principle, it in no way entails life without parole. One reason is that unless one believes, like Kant, that appropriate punishments must be carried out whatever the circumstances, we must acknowledge that other considerations are relevant to determining punishments ...


Reconciling The Rule Of Law: Rights And Punishment, Benjamin L. Apt 2019 Washington University in St. Louis

Reconciling The Rule Of Law: Rights And Punishment, Benjamin L. Apt

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

There is an intractable paradox in the relation between rights and criminal punishment. Criminal punishment frequently conflicts with rights; people typically have identical rights within a legal system, yet the punished are unable to exercise the rights to the same extent as other people. But criminal punishment, in conjunction with criminal laws, also operates to protect rights. To clarify the tension between rights and punishment, I start by analyzing the content and purpose of rights. Next I discuss the nature of rules and the particular types of rules that make up a typical “systems of rules.” I then argue that ...


A Clash Of Principles: Personal Jurisdiction And Two-Level Utilitarianism In The Information Age, Wesley M. Bernhardt 2019 Washington University in St. Louis

A Clash Of Principles: Personal Jurisdiction And Two-Level Utilitarianism In The Information Age, Wesley M. Bernhardt

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Utilitarianism provides the best analytic framework for “minimum contacts” analyses in multi-state mass tort litigation. Utilitarianism is a consequentialist ethical philosophy contending that one should act in a way that maximizes utility; that is, act in a way that maximizes pleasure and minimizes pain. This is often referred to as the “felicific calculus.”1 To maintain a civil lawsuit against a defendant, a court must have “personal jurisdiction” over that defendant, meaning that the defendant must have minimum contacts related to the suit such that maintenance of the suit does not offend traditional notions of fair play and substantial justice ...


Political Speech In The Armed Forces: Shouting Fire In A Crowded Cyberspace, Elliott Hughes 2019 Washington University in St. Louis

Political Speech In The Armed Forces: Shouting Fire In A Crowded Cyberspace, Elliott Hughes

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

A staple of the American version of democracy is civilian control of the military: we are uncomfortable with politicization of the Armed Forces, and military and other federal laws restrict the political expression of servicemembers (“SMs”) in the Armed Forces, whether they are active- duty members or National Guard or Reserves serving on active duty. These restrictions, while well-intentioned to prevent actual or apparent political partisanship or bias within the military, have the undesired effect of deterring SMs from otherwise healthy political expression. With the advent of the internet and proliferation of social media use, questions regarding SM status and ...


Ethnic Studies As Antisubordination Education: A Critical Race Theory Approach To Employment Discrimination Remedies, Theanne Liu 2019 Washington University School of Law, George Warren Brown School of Social Work

Ethnic Studies As Antisubordination Education: A Critical Race Theory Approach To Employment Discrimination Remedies, Theanne Liu

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This Note will use a critical race theory lens to argue that most trainings on equal employment opportunity (“EEO”), diversity, or implicit bias operate as a restrictive remedy to Title VII race discrimination violations, and that incorporating an ethnic studies framework into these trainings can further an expansive view of antidiscrimination law. A restrictive view of antidiscrimination law treats discrimination as an individual instead of structural or societal wrong and looks to addressing future acts of discrimination instead of redressing past and present injustices. An expansive view of antidiscrimination law sees its objective as eradicating conditions of racial subordination. Ethnic ...


The Self-Delegation False Alarm: Analyzing Auer Deference's Effect On Agency Rules, Daniel E. Walters 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Self-Delegation False Alarm: Analyzing Auer Deference's Effect On Agency Rules, Daniel E. Walters

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Auer deference holds that reviewing courts should defer to agencies when the latter interpret their own preexisting regulations. This doctrine relieves pressure on agencies to undergo costly notice-and-comment rulemaking each time interpretation of existing regulations is necessary. But according to some leading scholars and jurists, the doctrine actually encourages agencies to promulgate vague rules in the first instance, augmenting agency power and violating core separation of powers norms in the process. The claim that Auer perversely encourages agencies to “self-delegate”—that is, to create vague rules that can later be informally interpreted by agencies with latitude due to judicial deference ...


The Most Fundamental Right, Nicholas A. Robinson 2019 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

The Most Fundamental Right, Nicholas A. Robinson

Pace Law Faculty Publications

The Magna Carta and successors recognize a right to the environment as central to human existence. Along with associated rule of law and due process, 193 national charters recognize such a right — but not the U.S. Constitution. This right does lie latent in America’s state constitutions, however, and can also be read into the federal document as well. Meanwhile, recognition of environmental rights is expanding globally.


Neuroscience, Justice, And The "Mental Causation" Fallacy, John A. Humbach 2019 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Neuroscience, Justice, And The "Mental Causation" Fallacy, John A. Humbach

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Mental causation is a foundational assumption of modern criminal

justice. The law takes it for granted that wrongdoers “deserve”

punishment because their acts are caused by intentions, reasons and other

mental states. A growing body of neuroscience evidence shows, however,

that human behavior is produced by observable physiological activity in

the brain and central nervous system—all in accordance with ordinary

physical laws. Beyond these ordinary physiological interactions and

processes, no hypothesis of mental causation is required to causally

explain behavior.

Despite the evidence, neuroskeptics insist that intentions, reasons and

other mental states can play a causal role in producing ...


Polarization At The Supreme Court? Substantive Due Process Through The Prism Of Legal Theory, Miriam Galston 2019 The George Washington University

Polarization At The Supreme Court? Substantive Due Process Through The Prism Of Legal Theory, Miriam Galston

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Much has been written about Obergefell v. Hodges, holding that

same-sex marriage is protected by the Fourteenth Amendment. Virtually

all commentators view the decision as an example of an increasingly

polarized Supreme Court.

This article challenges that characterization by analyzing Kennedy’s

majority opinion and Roberts’ dissent in Obergefell in light of the legal

theories of H. L. A. Hart and Lon Fuller. The article argues that, from a

legal theory perspective, Kennedy and Roberts exhibit numerous, often

surprising commonalities. In addition, Kennedy’s arguments seem to

accurately reflect the methodology he explicitly endorses. Roberts, in

contrast, seems to exaggerate ...


Argument And The "Moral Impact" Theory Of The Law, Alana Golanski 2019 Columbia University School of Law

Argument And The "Moral Impact" Theory Of The Law, Alana Golanski

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

The innovative Moral Impact Theory (“MIT”) of law claims that the

moral impacts of legal institutional actions, rather than the linguistic

content of “rules” or judicial or legislative pronouncements, determine

law’s content. MIT’s corollary is that legal interpretation consists in the

inquiry into what is morally required as a consequence of the lawmaking

actions.

This paper challenges MIT by critiquing its attendant view of the

nature of legal interpretation and argument. Points include the following:

(1) it is not practicable to predicate law’s content on the ability of legal

officials to resolve moral controversies; (2) it would ...


Privacy And The Internet Of Things: Why Changing Expectations Demand Heightened Standards, Graham Johnson 2019 Washington University School of Law

Privacy And The Internet Of Things: Why Changing Expectations Demand Heightened Standards, Graham Johnson

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Entertainment consoles, wearable monitors, and security systems. For

better or worse, internet-connected devices are revolutionizing the

consumer products industry. Referred to broadly as the Internet of Things

(IoT), this ‘smart’ technology is drastically increasing the means, scope,

and frequency by which individuals communicate their personal

information. This Note explores the disruptive impact of IoT consumer

devices on the U.S.’s patchwork system of privacy protections. After

presenting a high-level survey of several key regulatory issues, this Note

argues that the proliferation of IoT devices exposes a fundamental flaw in

the Katz “reasonable expectation of privacy” standard. As individual

expectations ...


Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel 2019 Washington University School of Law

Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

At a time when the law is transforming gay rights, the LGBTQ

community finds itself at the climax of its latest civil rights challenge:

federal employment non-discrimination protections. This Note addresses

the federal circuit split regarding whether Title VII’s prohibition against

sex discrimination includes a prohibition on the basis of sexual

orientation. By integrating the Seventh Circuit’s analysis in Hively v. Ivy

Tech Community College within the frameworks of intersectionality,

identity performance, and queer theory, this Note evaluates how an

evolving understanding of Title VII’s protections affect members of the

LGBTQ communities.


Examining The Legality Of Employee Microchipping Under The Lens Of The Transhumanistic Proactionary Principle, Joshua Z. Wasbin 2019 Washington University School of Law

Examining The Legality Of Employee Microchipping Under The Lens Of The Transhumanistic Proactionary Principle, Joshua Z. Wasbin

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Modern workplaces are beginning to look to implanting their

employees with RFID microchips as a replacement for badges and

keycards. While both employers and employees stand to benefit from the

convenience of this innovation, states have begun to look to legislative

options for restricting employers from requiring that their employees get

microchipped. This Note will examine some of the state legislation and

will argue that Congress must institute a federal law that will provide

similar, if not stronger, levels of protection for employees who seek to

avoid being microchipped, an argument premised upon the

Transhumanistic Proactionary Principle.


Immunity Incorporated: All The Injustice That Jeffrey Epstein Can Buy, Janice G. Raymond 2019 University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Immunity Incorporated: All The Injustice That Jeffrey Epstein Can Buy, Janice G. Raymond

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


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