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Mary And Martha: Putting First Things First In A College Education, Michael A. Scaperlanda 2019 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Mary And Martha: Putting First Things First In A College Education, Michael A. Scaperlanda

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


A Catholic University Approach To Campus Speech: Using Constitutional Academic Freedom To Hold The Tension Of Free Speech, Inclusive Diversity, And University Identity, Sara E. Gross Methner 2019 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

A Catholic University Approach To Campus Speech: Using Constitutional Academic Freedom To Hold The Tension Of Free Speech, Inclusive Diversity, And University Identity, Sara E. Gross Methner

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Religious Beliefs, Practices, And Experiences Of Law Professors, James Lindgren 2019 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

The Religious Beliefs, Practices, And Experiences Of Law Professors, James Lindgren

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


A Catholic Perspective On Law School Diversity Requirements, Teresa Stanton Collett 2019 University of St. Thomas

A Catholic Perspective On Law School Diversity Requirements, Teresa Stanton Collett

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Academic Freedom And The Catholic University: An Historical Review, A Conceptual Analysis, And A Prescriptive Proposal, John M. Breen, Lee J. Strang 2019 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Academic Freedom And The Catholic University: An Historical Review, A Conceptual Analysis, And A Prescriptive Proposal, John M. Breen, Lee J. Strang

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Searching The Legacy Of The Reformation For Lutheran Responses To Modern Family Law, Marie A. Failinger 2019 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Searching The Legacy Of The Reformation For Lutheran Responses To Modern Family Law, Marie A. Failinger

Concordia Law Review

This article builds upon historical work on changes in the law of marriage, divorce and the family after the Reformation, and describes how modern Lutheran theology, formed during the Reformation, evaluates modern trends in American family law. From the key Lutheran theological insight that God is creatively ordering human activity as a partner with human beings, the Lutheran tradition approaches issues such as no-fault divorce and same-sex marriage with both trust and challenge.


A Common Enterprise: Law And The Connection Between Civil And Heavenly Realms In The Writings Of John Calvin, Kenneth L. Townsend 2019 Institute for Civic and Professional Engagement, Millsaps College

A Common Enterprise: Law And The Connection Between Civil And Heavenly Realms In The Writings Of John Calvin, Kenneth L. Townsend

Concordia Law Review

The common ends that once united spiritual and civil realms have been privatized as those ends have come to be seen as controversial and plural, rather than unifying and common. Acknowledging the diversity of ends resulted in increased attention to uniform rules. Since there was no longer agreement about what teloi mattered for society, law gradually lost its aspirational features and became simply a way to limit and punish uncivil and criminal behavior.

The formal separation, but ultimate unity, of civil and heavenly spheres, of norm with vision, articulated by Calvin, allowed him to be both idealistic and realistic about ...


Breaking The Perceptions Of Islamic Monolithism, Dr. Fatemah Albader 2019 University of Miami Law School

Breaking The Perceptions Of Islamic Monolithism, Dr. Fatemah Albader

University of Miami International and Comparative Law Review

No abstract provided.


Religious Courts In Secular Jurisdictions: How Jewish And Islamic Courts Adapt To Societal And Legal Norms, Rabea Benhalim 2019 Brooklyn Law School

Religious Courts In Secular Jurisdictions: How Jewish And Islamic Courts Adapt To Societal And Legal Norms, Rabea Benhalim

Brooklyn Law Review

At first glance, religious courts, especially Sharia courts, seem incompatible with secular, democratic societies. Nevertheless, Jewish and Islamic courts operate in countries like the United States, England, and Israel. Scholarship on these religious courts has primarily focused on whether such religious legal pluralism promotes the value of religious freedom, and if so, whether these secular legal systems should accommodate the continued existence of these courts. This article shifts the inquiry to determine whether religious courts in these environments accommodate litigants’ popular opinions and the secular, procedural, and substantive justice norms of the country in which they are located. This article ...


Catholic Social Teaching And Neo-Abolitionism: Tearing Down The House Of The Rising Sun, Elizabeth M. Donovan 2019 Ave Maria School of Law

Catholic Social Teaching And Neo-Abolitionism: Tearing Down The House Of The Rising Sun, Elizabeth M. Donovan

Cleveland State Law Review

Catholic Social Teaching (“CST”) is the body of literature written in the modern era by papal and episcopal teachers in response to current political, economic, and social issues. CST views individuals in the sex trade as victims, however they arrived in the trade. Prostitution abolitionists, called neo-abolitionists, because their current efforts to wipe out sex trafficking and prostitution mirror similar efforts by reformers in the early twentieth century, also view individuals in the sex trade as victims. A coalition of feminists and Christians developed neo-abolitionist social policy during the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. CST and neo-abolitionist social policy ...


Separate And Unequal: The Law Of "Domestic" And "International" Terrorism, Shirin Sinnar 2019 Stanford Law School

Separate And Unequal: The Law Of "Domestic" And "International" Terrorism, Shirin Sinnar

Michigan Law Review

U.S. law differentiates between two categories of terrorism. “International terrorism” covers threats with a putative international nexus, even when they stem from U.S. citizens or residents acting only within the United States. “Domestic terrorism” applies to political violence thought to be purely domestic in its origin and intended impact. The law permits broader surveillance, wider criminal charges, and more punitive treatment for crimes labeled international terrorism. Law enforcement agencies frequently consider U.S. Muslims “international” threats even when they have scant foreign ties. As a result, they police and punish them more intensely than white nationalists and other ...


Wisdom (Hikmah) As Perceived By Iranian Muslim Scholars: Reflections On Ibn Sina, Ghazali, And Suhrawardi, Leyla H. Tajer, Amir H. Zekrgoo 2019 University Islam Malaysia

Wisdom (Hikmah) As Perceived By Iranian Muslim Scholars: Reflections On Ibn Sina, Ghazali, And Suhrawardi, Leyla H. Tajer, Amir H. Zekrgoo

Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Multidisciplinary Studies

The evolution of the concept of spiritual/religious wisdom (ḥikamt) by the Iranian Muslim philosophers from the 10th to 12th century, may be studied under three main trends namely Mashā’i (Peripatetic), Kalām (theology), and Ishrāq (Illumination). Despite the correlation among these trends each of them grew independently. Among the three, the Hikmat-i Ishrāq (Illumination Wisdom) which is also known as Ḥikamt-i Dhawqi (Intuitive Wisdom) of Shahab al-Din Suhrawardi (1153-1191) found a special place as it tended to bring together the philosophical and theological aspects of wisdom. This survey would address the development of ikmat (wisdom) among ...


The Case Of The Religious Gay Blood Donor, Brian Soucek 2019 College of William & Mary Law School

The Case Of The Religious Gay Blood Donor, Brian Soucek

William & Mary Law Review

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibits sexually active gay men from donating blood. This Article envisions an original legal challenge to that rule: not the predictable equal protection suit, but a religious freedom claim brought by a gay man who wants to give blood as an act of charity. Because the FDA’s regulations substantially burden his exercise of religion—requiring a year of celibacy as its price—the FDA would be forced to show that its policy is the least restrictive means of preventing HIV transmission through the blood supply. Developments in testing technology and the experience of ...


The Church Abuse Scandal: Were Crimes Against Humanity Committed?, Dermot Groome 2019 Penn State Dickinson School of Law

The Church Abuse Scandal: Were Crimes Against Humanity Committed?, Dermot Groome

Dermot M Groome

Increasingly shocking revelations about sexual abuse by members of Catholic religious congregations and diocesan priests have recently raised the question of whether such widespread abuses constitute crimes against humanity. This paper considers that question in the context of a report issued by the Ryan Commission, an independent quasi-judicial commission that spent 10 years conducting detailed investigations into childcare institutions operated by Catholic religious congregations in Ireland. The Ryan Commission’s findings with respect to both widespread physical and sexual abuse provide a factual basis upon which to consider whether crimes against humanity were in fact committed. Contrasting the intentionality of ...


#Metoo Meets The Ministerial Exception: Sexual Harassment Claims By Clergy And The First Amendment's Religion Clauses, Ira C. Lupu, Robert W. Tuttle 2019 College of William & Mary Law School

#Metoo Meets The Ministerial Exception: Sexual Harassment Claims By Clergy And The First Amendment's Religion Clauses, Ira C. Lupu, Robert W. Tuttle

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Codifying A Sharia-Based Criminal Law In Developing Muslim Countries, Paul H. Robinson 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Codifying A Sharia-Based Criminal Law In Developing Muslim Countries, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This paper reproduces presentations made at the University of Tehran in March 2019 as part of the opening and closing remarks for a Conference on Criminal Law Development in Muslim-Majority Countries. The opening remarks discuss the challenges of codifying a Shari’a-based criminal code, drawing primarily from the experiences of Professor Robinson in directing codification projects in Somalia and the Maldives. The closing remarks apply many of those lessons to the situation currently existing in Iran. Included is a discussion of the implications for Muslim countries of Robinson’s social psychology work on the power of social influence and internalized ...


Christianity During Times Of Crisis: The European Refugee Movement, Kathryn Eckler 2019 William & Mary

Christianity During Times Of Crisis: The European Refugee Movement, Kathryn Eckler

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines the lives of Iranian Christian refugees who have filed for religious asylum in Austria. Each chapter presents a different legal and political phase Iranian Christian converts face in transitioning from life in Iran to the European Union. At the first stage of their journey, Iranian Christian converts are forced to live under the Islamic Republic of Iran. Upon fleeing their country, Iranian Christian refugees must adapt to the asylum laws of the European Union and United Nations. Refugees then file for asylum in a European Union member state; this thesis focuses on refugees who have filed for ...


Devotion ̶T̶O̶ And The Rule Of Law: Acknowledging The Role Of Religious Values In Judicial Decision-Making, Priya Purohit 2019 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Devotion ̶T̶O̶ And The Rule Of Law: Acknowledging The Role Of Religious Values In Judicial Decision-Making, Priya Purohit

Indiana Law Journal

This Comment advocates for the acknowledgment of religious values in judicial decision-making in three parts. Part I explores the role of religion in American politics, and more specifically, the role of religion in federal judicial confirmation hearings and state-level judicial elections. Membership to an institutionalized religion often performs an essential gatekeeping function when it comes to assessing the background or personal values of a candidate for political or judicial office. The initially positive role of religion in judicial selection processes suggests that the practice of refusing to acknowledge the role that religion likely already plays in judicial decision-making is wholly ...


Now, I'M Liberal, But To A Degree: An Essay On Debating Religious Liberty And Discrimination, Francis J. Beckwith 2019 Baylor University

Now, I'M Liberal, But To A Degree: An Essay On Debating Religious Liberty And Discrimination, Francis J. Beckwith

Cleveland State Law Review

This essay is a critical analysis of the book authored by John Corvino, Sherif Girgis, and Ryan T. Anderson, Debating Religious Liberty and Discrimination. The book offers two contrary views on how best to think about some of the conflicts that have arisen over religious liberty and anti-discrimination laws, e.g., Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Comm’n, 138 S. Ct. 1719 (2018). One position is defended by Corvino, and the other by Girgis and Anderson. After a brief discussion of the differing views of religious liberty throughout American history (including the American founding), this essay summarizes each ...


Standing For Standing Rock?: Vindicating Native American Religious And Land Rights By Adapting New Zealand's Te Awa Tupua Act To American Soil, Malcolm McDermond 2019 Penn State Dickinson Law

Standing For Standing Rock?: Vindicating Native American Religious And Land Rights By Adapting New Zealand's Te Awa Tupua Act To American Soil, Malcolm Mcdermond

Dickinson Law Review

On February 23, 2017, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (“Tribe”) was forced to disband its nearly year-long protest against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which threatened the integrity of its ancestral lands. The Tribe sought declaratory and injunctive relief in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, but the court ruled against the Tribe and failed to protect its interests. While the United States was forcibly removing Indigenous protesters, other countries were taking steps to protect Indigenous populations. In unprecedented legislative action, New Zealand took radical steps to protect the land and cultural rights of ...


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