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National Security Letters And Intelligence Oversight, Michael J. Greenlee 2018 Concordia University School of Law

National Security Letters And Intelligence Oversight, Michael J. Greenlee

Michael Greenlee

The history of NSL [national security letter] powers can serve as an illuminating example of the post­-Church Committee development of intelligence investigations. Many of the Church Committee findings and recommendations concerning the need for expanded oversight to prevent the executive branch from violating or ignoring the law, excessively using intrusive investigation techniques, and conducting overbroad investigations with inadequate controls on the retention and dissemi­nation of the information gathered are all reflected in the development of NSL powers and authorities from their creation in 1978 through passage of the PlRA [USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act] in 2006. At ...


The "Double Standard" Of Nonproliferation: Regime Type And The U.S. Response To Nuclear Weapons Program, Alina Shymanska 2018 NEREC Research Fellow

The "Double Standard" Of Nonproliferation: Regime Type And The U.S. Response To Nuclear Weapons Program, Alina Shymanska

International Journal of Nuclear Security

There is no doubt that the NPT regime is far from being equal for all states involved. As the predominant hegemonic power since WWII, the United States plays a major role in deciding the fates of non-great power proliferators. This article tries to find the logical explanation of the phenomenon whereby some nuclear proliferators are absolved regardless of their active accumulation of nuclear arsenals while others are labeled as “rogue states” and ordered to disarm. The article suggests that a particular proliferator’s political regime could affect the way in which its state is approached by the U.S., known ...


Pathologizing “Radicalization” And The Erosion Of Patient Privacy Rights, Kelly Morgan 2018 Boston College Law School

Pathologizing “Radicalization” And The Erosion Of Patient Privacy Rights, Kelly Morgan

Boston College Law Review

Countering Violent Extremism (“CVE”) is a counterterrorism strategy ostensibly aimed at preventing “radicalization” through risk assessment and intervention. CVE involves recruitment of helping professionals, including mental health care providers, to monitor their patients for signs of “vulnerability to radicalization,” make referrals to “de-radicalization” programs, and participate in multidisciplinary intervention teams. Broad national security and public safety exceptions within existing privacy laws allow mental health professionals participating in CVE to make potentially harmful disclosures of private patient information. This Note argues that professional associations representing mental health care providers should develop policies to limit and regulate members’ participation in CVE.


Protecting National Security Or Covering Up Malfeasance: The Modern State Secrets Privilege And Its Alternatives, Nicole Hallett 2018 University at Buffalo School of Law

Protecting National Security Or Covering Up Malfeasance: The Modern State Secrets Privilege And Its Alternatives, Nicole Hallett

Nicole Hallett

Available at https://www.yalelawjournal.org/forum/protecting-national-security-or-covering-up-malfeasance-the-modern-state-secrets-privilege-and-its-alternatives.


Back Matter, ADFSL 2018 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Back Matter, Adfsl

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

No abstract provided.


Front Matter, ADFSL 2018 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Front Matter, Adfsl

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

No abstract provided.


Contents, ADFSL 2018 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Contents, Adfsl

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

No abstract provided.


United To Deter: Dealing With New Means Of Supporting Terror, Frank A. Florio 2018 University of Miami Law School

United To Deter: Dealing With New Means Of Supporting Terror, Frank A. Florio

University of Miami International and Comparative Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Theory And Practice At The Intersection Between Human Rights And Humanitarian Law, Monica Hakimi 2018 University of Michigan Law School

The Theory And Practice At The Intersection Between Human Rights And Humanitarian Law, Monica Hakimi

Reviews

The United States is more than fifteen years into a fight against terrorism that shows no sign of abating and, with the change in administration, appears to be intensifying. Other Western democracies that have historically been uneasy about U.S. counterterrorism policies have, in recent years, shifted toward those policies. And armed nonstate groups continue to commit large-scale acts of violence in multiple distinct theaters. The legal issues that these situations present are not entirely new, but neither are they going away. Recent publications, like the three works under review, thus provide useful opportunities to reflect on and refine our ...


“Frankly Unthinkable”: The Constitutional Failings Of President Trump’S Proposed Muslim Registry, A. Reid Monroe-Sheridan 2018 University of Maine School of Law

“Frankly Unthinkable”: The Constitutional Failings Of President Trump’S Proposed Muslim Registry, A. Reid Monroe-Sheridan

Maine Law Review

On several occasions during the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump endorsed the creation of a mandatory government registry for Muslims in the United States— not just visitors from abroad, but American citizens as well. This astonishing proposal has received little attention in legal scholarship to date, even though Trump has refused to renounce the idea following his election to the presidency. In this Article, I attempt to address President Trump’ s proposal in several ways. First, I aim to provide a thorough analysis demonstrating unequivocally that such a “ Muslim registry,” with the characteristics President Trump has endorsed, would violate the ...


Newsroom: Interrogation Expert Warns Against Use Of Torture 2-2-2018, Roger Williams University School of Law 2018 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Interrogation Expert Warns Against Use Of Torture 2-2-2018, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Venezuela Public Health Issue, Luke Vargas 2018 Augustana College, Rock Island Illinois

Venezuela Public Health Issue, Luke Vargas

Global Public Health

While every country around the world faces a form of public health issues, the issues that the country of Venezuela faces are different. Their public health problem is not a disease that can be solved by science, or a cure. It’s a problem that can only be solved by the people within the county itself. The country of Venezuela now lacks the proper medical supplies needed to help cure diseases and normal vaccinations, and the only ones to blame is their government. Because their government has now refused to pay their debts to the surrounding countries they have now ...


Critical Infrastructure, Cybersecurity, And Market Failure, John J. Chung 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Critical Infrastructure, Cybersecurity, And Market Failure, John J. Chung

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Treason And Terror: A Toxic Brew, B. Mitchell Simpson III 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Treason And Terror: A Toxic Brew, B. Mitchell Simpson Iii

Roger Williams University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Treason And Terror: A Toxic Brew, B. Mitchell Simpson III 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Treason And Terror: A Toxic Brew, B. Mitchell Simpson Iii

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Reforming The Pentagon: Reflections On How Everything Became War And The Military Became Everything, Mark P. Nevitt 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Reforming The Pentagon: Reflections On How Everything Became War And The Military Became Everything, Mark P. Nevitt

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

What best explains how “Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything?”— the provocative title of a recent book by Professor Rosa Brooks of Georgetown Law. In this Essay, I turn to the Department of Defense’s (DoD) unique agency design as the vehicle to address this question. Specifically, I first describe and analyze the role that the 1947 National Security Act and 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Act play in incentivizing organizational behavior within the DoD. These two Acts have broad implications for national security governance. Relatedly, I address the consequences of these two core national security laws, focusing on the rise ...


The Posse Comitatus Act And The Fourth Amendment's Exclusionary Rule, Patrick Walsh, Paul Sullivan 2018 University of Virginia

The Posse Comitatus Act And The Fourth Amendment's Exclusionary Rule, Patrick Walsh, Paul Sullivan

American University National Security Law Brief

No abstract provided.


How Cybersecurity Regulation For The Smart Grid Could Upset The Current Balance Of Federal And State Jurisdiction In Electricity Regulation, Cynthia Anderson 2018 American University Washington College of Law

How Cybersecurity Regulation For The Smart Grid Could Upset The Current Balance Of Federal And State Jurisdiction In Electricity Regulation, Cynthia Anderson

American University National Security Law Brief

No abstract provided.


Is The President A Traitor? A Legal Analysis, Noah Kupferberg 2018 Brooklyn Law School

Is The President A Traitor? A Legal Analysis, Noah Kupferberg

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Security And Human Rights Dilemma: An Inquiry Into U.S.-Ethiopia Diplomatic Relations 1991-2012, Seife Ayalew 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

The Security And Human Rights Dilemma: An Inquiry Into U.S.-Ethiopia Diplomatic Relations 1991-2012, Seife Ayalew

Northwestern Journal of Human Rights

In the post-1991 U.S.-Ethiopian diplomacy, the use of foreign policy as a framework to advance the cause of human rights has faced several challenges rooted in the way human rights is defined and the intricate interests vested in the U.S. foreign policy establishment. This article elucidates the limitations and challenges of diplomatic machinery as a framework for advancing the cause of human rights. First, human rights in the U.S. foreign policy machine have been given a marginal or subordinate place in diplomatic priorities. Second, the Government of Ethiopia’s (GOE) resistance and tough diplomatic measures and ...


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