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The Pedagogy Of "Yes We Can": Teaching Reformative Legal Justice In The Age Of Obama, LeRoy Pernell 2010 Florida A&M University College of Law

The Pedagogy Of "Yes We Can": Teaching Reformative Legal Justice In The Age Of Obama, Leroy Pernell

Journal Publications

These brief comments, delivered as part of the 5th Annual Fred Gray Sr. Civil Rights Symposium, Faulkner University, Thomas Goode Jones School of Law October 21, 2009, do not challenge whether law schools and the profession sufficiently make the case for public service and commitment to societal good; admittedly most existing standards and curricula do. Rather, these comments address the opportunity for legal education to tap, and expand on, a heightened psychological and emotional commitment that might be engendered in law students following the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States.


What Balance In Legal Education Means To Me: A Dissenting View, Lawrence Raful 2010 Touro Law Center

What Balance In Legal Education Means To Me: A Dissenting View, Lawrence Raful

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


The Accidental Clinician And The Experienced Director: A Conversation On The Value Of Externships, Marjorie A. Silver, Mary Jo Eyster 2010 Touro Law Center

The Accidental Clinician And The Experienced Director: A Conversation On The Value Of Externships, Marjorie A. Silver, Mary Jo Eyster

Scholarly Works

In the summer of 2010, Mary Jo Eyster and Marjorie Silver conversed, via email, about the ways in which externship programs add unique value to the student’s education, separate and apart from their cost-effectiveness as compared to the in-house clinic. The result is this paper, a dialogue between a stand-up teacher who chose to teach the externship seminar and a seasoned clinician.

Mary Jo and Marjorie agree that the well-designed, well-executed program should drive the design, teaching and administration of externships and their accompanying seminars. They share the goals that each of them privilege in the programs they have ...


Teaching Public Citizen Lawyering: From Aspiration To Inspiration, Mae C. Quinn 2010 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Teaching Public Citizen Lawyering: From Aspiration To Inspiration, Mae C. Quinn

UF Law Faculty Publications

This essay is concerned with teaching students about responding to the everyday travesties and inequities they may encounter in our courts and legal system. This essay outlines the ways in which I have tried to convey to students the importance of the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct Preamble’s message of lawyer as public citizen. In it I share my view that law schools—not only in traditional professional responsibility courses—should encourage students to grapple with this ethical concern which is not fully captured by the “black letter” rules. I hope to more deeply explore what it means ...


Legal Research As A Fundamental Skill: A Lifeboat For Students And Law Schools, Sarah Valentine 2010 The City University of New York School of Law

Legal Research As A Fundamental Skill: A Lifeboat For Students And Law Schools, Sarah Valentine

University of Baltimore Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Other Side Of The Story: Using Graphic Organizers To Counter The Counter-Analysis Quandary, Lisa T. McElroy, Christine N. Coughlin 2010 Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law

The Other Side Of The Story: Using Graphic Organizers To Counter The Counter-Analysis Quandary, Lisa T. Mcelroy, Christine N. Coughlin

University of Baltimore Law Review

No abstract provided.


Digitization And Democracy: The Conflict Between The Amazon Kindle License Agreement And The Role Of Libraries In A Free Society, Gregory K. Laughlin 2010 Cumberland School of Law

Digitization And Democracy: The Conflict Between The Amazon Kindle License Agreement And The Role Of Libraries In A Free Society, Gregory K. Laughlin

University of Baltimore Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Uniform Bar Examination: A Benefit To Law School Graduates, Veryl Victoria Miles 2010 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Uniform Bar Examination: A Benefit To Law School Graduates, Veryl Victoria Miles

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

No abstract provided.


Law School Histories: A Panel Discussion, 2010 Campbell University School of Law

Law School Histories: A Panel Discussion

Campbell Law Review

At the Sixty-First Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools held in Palm Beach, Florida in July 2008, a panel was convened to discuss the researching, writing, and publishing of law school histories. What follows is an edited transcript of the program.


The Excitement Of Interdictory Ideas: A Response To Professor Anders Walker, Marc O. DeGirolami 2010 St. John's University School of Law

The Excitement Of Interdictory Ideas: A Response To Professor Anders Walker, Marc O. Degirolami

Faculty Publications

The very first time that I taught criminal law, I would occasionally tell my six-year-old son, Thomas, about selected cases and situations that I had come across. Thomas enjoyed these discussions—more than I would have guessed: he was captivated by the horror of Dudley & Stephens, he was uncomfortably intrigued by shaming punishments, he was appropriately outraged at all manner of outcomes that seemed to him too harsh or too lenient. But most of all, he wanted to test his own burgeoning intuitions about right and wrong, good and evil, the permitted and the forbidden, against my "criminal law stories." He was, in a word, excited by criminal law.

Criminal law provokes. It stimulates and incites. Criminal law often is taught in the second semester of the first year, so it labors under something of a disadvantage. It begins just after students have been faced with the realities of their first semester grades. One might therefore expect some disenchanted reticence—a bit of yawning 'plus-ca-change-isme'—but that has not been my experience. More than any other course, criminal law challenges students to confront the deep places of their own moral and political architecture, erected in fragments over a lifetime, with realities that are, often enough, unknown and frightening to them. At its best, criminal law induces alienation in students, shocks the safety, piety, and certitude of their worlds. It does this, at times, by confronting students with their own fears about their fellow human beings and demanding that they reflect on those fears with care-not with the express aim that they should be solved or overcome, but in order that they may be better understood.

Having canvassed admirably the historical changes to the criminal law case book over the twentieth century, Professor Anders Walker's article suggests that criminal law ought to concern itself with the business of training future prosecutors and defense attorneys by eliminating, or at least greatly reducing, the place of moral and political reflection in the course, which was in any event the supercilious indulgence of elite law schools that disprized criminal practice. His normative prescriptions are of a piece with much that is currently in vogue in criticisms of legal education: that it is impractical, that it does not respond to the urgencies of quotidian lawyerly concerns, and that it deludes itself that it ought to be something like a liberal education. "That law schools should strive to produce better citizens is hard to refute[,]" he writes, but "[w]hat good are ethics, philosophy, and sociology if graduating students do not know the law?"

This brief response to Professor Walker's article makes two points. First, "knowing the law," in the sense that Walker seems to intend the phrase, has very little to do either with what state prosecutors (to take the criminal practice with which I am somewhat familiar) actually do or, more importantly, with the reasons that lawyers decide to become criminal practitioners in the first place. Second, adopting the normative prescriptions pressed by Walker will extinguish precisely the excitement that criminal law can bring to the generally educated and interested lawyer. There have been, and there will always be, few lawyers who become prosecutors and criminal defense attorneys; no structural amendments to the course will change that. But bleeding the criminal law course of the very ideas that stimulate passion about the subject will ensure that law schools continue to contribute to the stultifying process by which students forget, inexorably, what it is that is worthwhile and fulfilling about becoming a lawyer at ...


Before They Even Start: Hope And Incoming 1ls, Barbara Brunner 2010 Penn State Law

Before They Even Start: Hope And Incoming 1ls, Barbara Brunner

Journal Articles

Newly-accepted law school 1Ls often express interest in how they should spend the summer before starting their fall courses in order to be best prepared for success in their first semester. This desire to have a "leg up" on law school success leads those of us teaching first-year courses to think more deeply about what constitutes a "good preparation" for the unique experiences that new law students will face, and what skills are really necessary to increase their possibilities of success, especially in the first semester.

Over the past few years, I have compiled a list of activities which I ...


A “Sending Down” Sabbatical: The Benefits Of Lawyering In The Legal Services Trenches, Stephen A. Rosenbaum, Suzanne Rabé 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

A “Sending Down” Sabbatical: The Benefits Of Lawyering In The Legal Services Trenches, Stephen A. Rosenbaum, Suzanne Rabé

Publications

This article proposes that clinical professors, and legal writing professors in particular, consider practicing law - in real-life, non-clinical settings - during some significant portion of their sabbaticals from teaching. This proposal would (1) improve the learning experience for students in clinics, writing classes, and skills classes, (2) offer a vital public service to the under-represented, and (3) improve the overall administration of justice. At little cost, this proposal would foster a richer engagement by clinicians and legal writing professors with the world of legal practice. This idea could also infuse increased life and meaning into our law school classes. The Carnegie ...


Jefferson's Vision Fulfilled: The Nation's Oldest Law School Celebrates 230 Years Of Educating Citizen Lawyers, Davison M. Douglas 2010 William & Mary Law School

Jefferson's Vision Fulfilled: The Nation's Oldest Law School Celebrates 230 Years Of Educating Citizen Lawyers, Davison M. Douglas

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Ensuring A Multicultural Educational Experience In Legal Education: Start With The Legal Writing Classroom, Johanna K.P. Dennis 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Ensuring A Multicultural Educational Experience In Legal Education: Start With The Legal Writing Classroom, Johanna K.P. Dennis

Publications

This Article discusses the two-fold nature of multicultural education- educating on multicultural topics and educating multicultural students. By examining eight different law schools, the Author discusses current efforts in each law school that impact the educational experience, the shortfalls in these efforts, the need for first-year integration of multicultural topics, and how an educator in the legal academy can ensure that her students receive a well-rounded multicultural educational experience. In particular, the Article addresses multicultural education through the lens of a legal writing professor, whose role entails instructing students on predictive and persuasive writing over the course of the first ...


Raising The Bar: Us Legal Education In An International Setting, Claudio Grossman 2010 American University Washington College of Law

Raising The Bar: Us Legal Education In An International Setting, Claudio Grossman

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


Legal Education Reform, Claudio Grossman 2010 American University Washington College of Law

Legal Education Reform, Claudio Grossman

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


The Ivory Tower At Ground Zero: Conflict And Convergence In Legal Education's Responses To Terrorism, Peter Margulies 2010 Roger Williams University School of Law

The Ivory Tower At Ground Zero: Conflict And Convergence In Legal Education's Responses To Terrorism, Peter Margulies

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Honors Convocation, University of Michigan Law School 2010 University of Michigan Law School

Honors Convocation, University Of Michigan Law School

Commencement and Honors Materials

Program for the May 7, 2010 University of Michigan Law School Honors Convocation.


University Of Michigan Law School Faculty, 2010-2011, University of Michigan Law School 2010 University of Michigan Law School

University Of Michigan Law School Faculty, 2010-2011, University Of Michigan Law School

Miscellaneous Law School Publications

Biographies of the University of Michigan Law School faculty.


Lawyering At The Intersection Of Mediation And Community Economic Development: Interweaving Inclusive Legal Problem Solving Skills In The Training Of Effective Lawyers, Beryl Blaustone, Carmen Huertas-Noble 2010 CUNY School of Law

Lawyering At The Intersection Of Mediation And Community Economic Development: Interweaving Inclusive Legal Problem Solving Skills In The Training Of Effective Lawyers, Beryl Blaustone, Carmen Huertas-Noble

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

In this Essay, Beryl Blaustone and Carmen Huertas-Noble insightfully explore the intersections between community economic development (CED) legal practice and mediation. They suggest that CED lawyers and mediators frequently engage in parallel roles and employ similar skill sets to foster creative problem solving, empower clients and client communities, and advance the interests of all the parties. In their view, both CED lawyers and mediators should engage in what the authors call "inclusive problem-solving," an overlapping skill set that includes metacognitive self-awareness; robust information gathering and focusing with clients; and reframing positions, framing issues,and generating options that maximize the group ...


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