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An Autobiography Of A Digital Idea: From Waging War Against Laptops To Engaging Students With Laptops, Diana R. Donahoe 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

An Autobiography Of A Digital Idea: From Waging War Against Laptops To Engaging Students With Laptops, Diana R. Donahoe

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This is an autobiographical account of my attempt to bridge the digital divide to meet students' changing needs. When I first began teaching at Georgetown University Law Center in 1993, I employed many traditional teaching techniques and used printed textbooks. However, laptops soon began peppering my classroom; at first there were only a few, and then suddenly almost every student was hiding behind a laptop. I noticed that my students were looking down at their screens, typing furiously, instead of watching me while I discussed my material written on the blackboard or projected overhead. When I realized that I was ...


Harvard And Yale Ascendant: The Legal Education Of The Justices From Holmes To Kagan, Patrick J. Glen 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Harvard And Yale Ascendant: The Legal Education Of The Justices From Holmes To Kagan, Patrick J. Glen

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

With the nomination of Elena Kagan to be a justice of the United States Supreme Court, it is quite possible that eight of the nine justices will have graduated from only two law schools—Harvard and Yale. This article frames this development in the historical context of the legal education of those justices confirmed between 1902 and 2010. What this historical review makes clear is that the Ivy League dominance of the Supreme Court is a relatively recent occurrence whose beginnings can be traced to Antonin Scalia’s 1986 confirmation. Prior to that time, although Harvard and Yale were consistently ...


University Of Michigan Law School Faculty, 2010-2011, University of Michigan Law School 2010 University of Michigan Law School

University Of Michigan Law School Faculty, 2010-2011, University Of Michigan Law School

Miscellaneous Law School Publications

Biographies of the University of Michigan Law School faculty.


Honors Convocation, University of Michigan Law School 2010 University of Michigan Law School

Honors Convocation, University Of Michigan Law School

Commencement and Honors Materials

Program for the May 7, 2010 University of Michigan Law School Honors Convocation.


Advanced Legal Studies And Research, University of Michigan Law School 2010 University of Michigan Law School

Advanced Legal Studies And Research, University Of Michigan Law School

Miscellaneous Law School Publications

Pamphlet highlighting history & alumni, internationalism, graduate programs, research programs, and the law school community at the University of Michigan Law School.


Closing The Legislative Experience Gap: How A Legislative Law Clerk Program Will Benefit The Legal Profession And Congress, Dakota S. Rudesill 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Closing The Legislative Experience Gap: How A Legislative Law Clerk Program Will Benefit The Legal Profession And Congress, Dakota S. Rudesill

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Most federal law today is statutory or rooted in statutes, which are created through a complicated process best understood through work experience inside legislatures. This article demonstrates that America’s most influential lawyers are not getting it. My new empirical analysis of the work experience of the top 500 lawyers nationwide as ranked by Lawdragon.com finds that work experience in legislative bodies is dramatically less common among the profession’s leaders than is formative work experience in courts, government executive agencies, private practice, and academe. This article continues the empirical study of the professional experience of the legal profession ...


Governing Board Accountability: Competition, Regulation And Accreditation, Judith C. Areen 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Governing Board Accountability: Competition, Regulation And Accreditation, Judith C. Areen

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This article examines the three primary ways in which the governing boards of American colleges and universities are held to account: (1) competition; (2) regulation, including state nonprofit corporation laws, tax laws, and licensing laws; and (3) accreditation. It begins by tracing how lay (meaning nonfaculty) governing boards became the dominant form of governance in American higher education. It argues that governing boards provide American institutions of higher education with an exceptional degree of autonomy from state control and that, together with the shared governance approach that gives faculties primary responsibility for academic matters, they have been a vital factor ...


Raising The Bar: Standards-Based Training, Supervision, And Evaluation, Adele Bernhard 2010 Pace Law School

Raising The Bar: Standards-Based Training, Supervision, And Evaluation, Adele Bernhard

Pace Law Faculty Publications

In this short Article, I sketch the methodology my colleagues and I at Pace Law School use to incorporate practice standards into our clinical teach-ing and reflect on how a standards-based teaching paradigm could be adapted to the training, supervision, and evaluation of public defenders. Then, I briefly consider how standards and standards-based teaching assist in the administration of assigned counsel plans and in the evaluation of the performance of public defender organizations. Although this Article does not cover any of these topics in depth, my goal is to introduce the reader to a standards-based approach to teaching and suggest ...


Supporting Scholarship: Thoughts On The Role Of The Academic Law Librarian, Richard A. Danner 2010 Duke Law School

Supporting Scholarship: Thoughts On The Role Of The Academic Law Librarian, Richard A. Danner

Faculty Scholarship

Discussing the role of the law library in legal education is necessary and essential, both because of the demands libraries place on increasingly tight law school budgets and space, and the challenges that libraries face as the information they collect and organize has moved largely from print to digital formats. This paper explores the roles of academic law librarians in supporting faculty scholarship within the context of the forces affecting libraries, librarians, and legal education in the (still early) twenty-first century. Although it has been more than 30 years since the widespread adoption of the legal research databases in the ...


The Pedagogy Of "Yes We Can": Teaching Reformative Legal Justice In The Age Of Obama, LeRoy Pernell 2010 Florida A&M University College of Law

The Pedagogy Of "Yes We Can": Teaching Reformative Legal Justice In The Age Of Obama, Leroy Pernell

Journal Publications

These brief comments, delivered as part of the 5th Annual Fred Gray Sr. Civil Rights Symposium, Faulkner University, Thomas Goode Jones School of Law October 21, 2009, do not challenge whether law schools and the profession sufficiently make the case for public service and commitment to societal good; admittedly most existing standards and curricula do. Rather, these comments address the opportunity for legal education to tap, and expand on, a heightened psychological and emotional commitment that might be engendered in law students following the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States.


Levinas, Law Schools And The Poor: They Stand Over Us, Marie Failinger 2010 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Levinas, Law Schools And The Poor: They Stand Over Us, Marie Failinger

Faculty Scholarship

In the style of philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, who has written about the ethics of the Face, this essay challenges the complacency of most American law schools in response to the plight of the poor and proposes ways in which the law school curriculum, space and programs can be re-configured to bring the poor into community with legal educators and students.


A “Sending Down” Sabbatical: The Benefits Of Lawyering In The Legal Services Trenches, Stephen A. Rosenbaum, Suzanne Rabé 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

A “Sending Down” Sabbatical: The Benefits Of Lawyering In The Legal Services Trenches, Stephen A. Rosenbaum, Suzanne Rabé

Publications

This article proposes that clinical professors, and legal writing professors in particular, consider practicing law - in real-life, non-clinical settings - during some significant portion of their sabbaticals from teaching. This proposal would (1) improve the learning experience for students in clinics, writing classes, and skills classes, (2) offer a vital public service to the under-represented, and (3) improve the overall administration of justice. At little cost, this proposal would foster a richer engagement by clinicians and legal writing professors with the world of legal practice. This idea could also infuse increased life and meaning into our law school classes. The Carnegie ...


Finding The Middle Ground In Collection Development: How Academic Law Libraries Can Shape Their Collections In Response To The Call For More Practice-Oriented Legal Education, Leslie A. Street, Amanda M. Runyon 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Finding The Middle Ground In Collection Development: How Academic Law Libraries Can Shape Their Collections In Response To The Call For More Practice-Oriented Legal Education, Leslie A. Street, Amanda M. Runyon

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

To examine how academic law libraries can respond to the call for more practice-oriented legal education, the authors compared trends in collection management decisions regarding secondary sources at academic and law firm libraries along with law firm librarians’ perceptions of law school legal research training of new associates.


What Balance In Legal Education Means To Me: A Dissenting View, Lawrence Raful 2010 Touro Law Center

What Balance In Legal Education Means To Me: A Dissenting View, Lawrence Raful

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


The Accidental Clinician And The Experienced Director: A Conversation On The Value Of Externships, Marjorie A. Silver, Mary Jo Eyster 2010 Touro Law Center

The Accidental Clinician And The Experienced Director: A Conversation On The Value Of Externships, Marjorie A. Silver, Mary Jo Eyster

Scholarly Works

In the summer of 2010, Mary Jo Eyster and Marjorie Silver conversed, via email, about the ways in which externship programs add unique value to the student’s education, separate and apart from their cost-effectiveness as compared to the in-house clinic. The result is this paper, a dialogue between a stand-up teacher who chose to teach the externship seminar and a seasoned clinician.

Mary Jo and Marjorie agree that the well-designed, well-executed program should drive the design, teaching and administration of externships and their accompanying seminars. They share the goals that each of them privilege in the programs they have ...


In Forma Pauperis, Sec. 514.040: A Practical User's Guide For Attorneys, Christine E. Rollins 2010 Saint Louis University School of Law

In Forma Pauperis, Sec. 514.040: A Practical User's Guide For Attorneys, Christine E. Rollins

All Faculty Scholarship

Missouri attorneys have the ability to have costs and fees waived for their indigent clients.


Keeping Up With Legal Technology: Five Easy Places, Jennifer L. Behrens 2010 Duke Law School

Keeping Up With Legal Technology: Five Easy Places, Jennifer L. Behrens

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Teaching Public Citizen Lawyering: From Aspiration To Inspiration, Mae C. Quinn 2010 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Teaching Public Citizen Lawyering: From Aspiration To Inspiration, Mae C. Quinn

UF Law Faculty Publications

This essay is concerned with teaching students about responding to the everyday travesties and inequities they may encounter in our courts and legal system. This essay outlines the ways in which I have tried to convey to students the importance of the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct Preamble’s message of lawyer as public citizen. In it I share my view that law schools—not only in traditional professional responsibility courses—should encourage students to grapple with this ethical concern which is not fully captured by the “black letter” rules. I hope to more deeply explore what it means ...


Doing Good While Doing Deals: Early Lesson In Launching An International Transactions Clinic, Deborah Burand 2010 Unviersity of Michigan Law School

Doing Good While Doing Deals: Early Lesson In Launching An International Transactions Clinic, Deborah Burand

Articles

That is not to say that the launch of this clinic was easy. Four of the most challenging issues the ITC faced in its first year of operation were: 1) developing a client pool, 2) defining client projects so as to be appropriate to student clinicians’ skill levels and capacity, 3) making use of efficient and inexpensive technology to foster international communication with clients and transaction management, and 4) tapping supervisory attorney talent capable of supporting student clinicians in their international transactional work. The first two issues were the biggest challenges that we faced in launching the ITC and so ...


Maximizing The Recruitment Of Scholarship-Hungry Law Faculty: A Modest Change To The Far Form, Porcher L. Taylor III 2010 University of Richmond

Maximizing The Recruitment Of Scholarship-Hungry Law Faculty: A Modest Change To The Far Form, Porcher L. Taylor Iii

School of Professional and Continuing Studies Faculty Publications

Recognizing the critical need for law school recruitment teams to better assess in advance the scholarship agendas of entry-level candidates registered with the AALS Faculty Appointments Register (FAR) and of candidates who receive on-campus interviews, this article innovatively explores how a modest change to the FAR form might facilitate and transform the recruitment of scholarship-hungry tenure-track faculty.


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