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3,697 full-text articles. Page 1 of 77.

Reasonable Inference Of Authority To Control Hazardous Waste Disposal Results In Potential Liability: United States V. Aceto Agricultural Chemicals Corporation, Anita Letter 2020 University of New Mexico

Reasonable Inference Of Authority To Control Hazardous Waste Disposal Results In Potential Liability: United States V. Aceto Agricultural Chemicals Corporation, Anita Letter

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Juliana V. United States, Daniel Brister 2019 University of Montana School of Law

Juliana V. United States, Daniel Brister

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In 2015, a group of adolescents between the ages of eight and nineteen filed a lawsuit against the federal government for infringing upon their civil rights to a healthy, habitable future living environment. Those Plaintiffs in Juliana v. United States alleged that the industrial-scale burning of fossil fuels was causing catastrophic and destabilizing impacts to the global climate, threatening the survival and welfare of present and future generations. Seeking to reduce the United States’ contributions to atmospheric carbon dioxide, Plaintiffs demanded injunctive and declaratory relief to halt the federal government’s policies of promoting and subsidizing fossil fuels, due to ...


Appalachian Voices V. State Water Control Board, Thomas C. Mooney-Myers 2019 “Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Appalachian Voices V. State Water Control Board, Thomas C. Mooney-Myers

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Virginia State Water Control Board certified the issuance of permits for the construction of a natural gas pipeline that traversed over 300 miles of Virginia in addition to other states. Local environmental groups and individuals petitioned the Fourth Circuit to review the certification under the Administrative Procedure Act. The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals gave deference to the agency’s actions and denied the petition for review.


Cultural Heritage Preservation In The Context Of Climate Change Adaptation Or Relocation: Barbuda As A Case Study, Martha B. Lerski 2019 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Cultural Heritage Preservation In The Context Of Climate Change Adaptation Or Relocation: Barbuda As A Case Study, Martha B. Lerski

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This case study introduces an arts camp methodology of engaging communities in identifying their key cultural heritage features, thus serving as a meta study. It presents original research based on field studies on the climate-vulnerable Caribbean island of Barbuda during 2017 and 2018. Its Valued Cultural Elements survey, enabling precise identification of key tangible and intangible art forms and biocultural practices, may serve as a basis for further studies. Such approaches may facilitate future research or planning as climate-vulnerable communities harness Local or Indigenous Knowledge for purposes of biocultural heritage preservation, or towards adaptation or relocation. I report on findings ...


Journal Of Land And Development, Volume 8, Issue 1, 2019 University of Baltimore Law

Journal Of Land And Development, Volume 8, Issue 1

University of Baltimore Journal of Land and Development

No abstract provided.


Creating A Special Benefits District For Baltimore’S Patterson Park, Scott M. Richmond 2019 University of Baltimore Law

Creating A Special Benefits District For Baltimore’S Patterson Park, Scott M. Richmond

University of Baltimore Journal of Land and Development

No abstract provided.


The End Of The Road: A Brief History Of The Journal Of Land And Development, Brady Getlan 2019 University of Baltimore Law

The End Of The Road: A Brief History Of The Journal Of Land And Development, Brady Getlan

University of Baltimore Journal of Land and Development

No abstract provided.


Recent Development: Billionaire Can’T Buy The Beach, D'ereka Bolden 2019 University of Baltimore Law

Recent Development: Billionaire Can’T Buy The Beach, D'Ereka Bolden

University of Baltimore Journal of Land and Development

No abstract provided.


Indigenous Environmental Network V. United States Department Of State, Seth Sivinski 2019 University of Montana School of Law

Indigenous Environmental Network V. United States Department Of State, Seth Sivinski

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Pipelines are an extremely efficient way to move large amounts of oil and gas across long distances. However, pipelines have become a lightning rod for environmentalists opposing the lines’ construction and the energy sector which considers the lines a must to achieve energy independence and security. Pipelines are massive projects often crossing interstate and international boundaries. As a result, they are subject to an extensive amount of government regulation with an accompanying assortment of legal challenges. Indigenous Environmental Network v. United States Department of State is the latest case in the Keystone XL pipeline saga, wherein the United States District ...


Kloker V. Fort Peck Tribes, Hallee Kansman 2019 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Kloker V. Fort Peck Tribes, Hallee Kansman

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Kloker v. Fort Peck Tribes investigates and deciphers the application of the Indian canons of construction to the congressional formation and establishment of the Fort Peck reservation in Montana. In general, courts interpret congressional acts creating reservations through the lens of the tribal-federal government trust relationship. Although this case examines different substantive models of legal interpretation and theories of water law, the ultimate dispute is textual in nature—questioning the plain language of the establishment legislation itself.


The Transformation Of The Antiquities Act: A Call For Amending The President’S Power Regarding National Monument Designations, Andrew Diaz 2019 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Transformation Of The Antiquities Act: A Call For Amending The President’S Power Regarding National Monument Designations, Andrew Diaz

Golden Gate University Law Review

Part I of this Comment discusses the background of the Antiquities Act, including: the legislature’s intent in drafting the Act, changes to the law, and how it has been used throughout the years. This section then discusses various legal challenges to designations made under the Antiquities Act and looks at why these designations are sometimes controversial. Part II discusses the calls by many politicians to either amend or repeal the Act and explains why current proposed legislation is insufficient. This Comment critiques the proposed legislation and calls for the passage of sensible legislation that would require a more transparent ...


Maralex Resources, Inc. V. Barnhardt, Bradley E. Tinker 2019 University of Montana

Maralex Resources, Inc. V. Barnhardt, Bradley E. Tinker

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In Maralex Resources v. Barnhardt, Maralex and property owners brought an action to protect private property from BLM inspections of oil and gas lease sites. The Tenth Circuit looked at the plain meaning of a congressional statute and held in favor of Maralex, finding that BLM lacked authority to require a private landowner to provide BLM with a key to inspect wells of their property. The Tenth Circuit held BLM has the authority to conduct inspections without prior notice on private property lease sites; however, it is required to contact the property owner for permission before entering the property.


Murray V. Bej Minerals, Llc, Brett Berntsen 2019 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Murray V. Bej Minerals, Llc, Brett Berntsen

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Part of a dispute some 66 million years in the making, Murray v. BEJ Minerals, LLC considered for the first time whether dinosaur fossils—specifically a one-of-a-kind specimen containing entombed “dueling dinosaurs”—qualified as “minerals” for the purposes of a property transaction under Montana law. Finding no consistent statutory or dictionary definition for “mineral,” the Ninth Circuit relied on a test previously utilized by the Montana Supreme Court to hold that the dinosaur fossils constituted minerals due to their rare and exceptional qualities and were therefore part of the property’s mineral estate. The decision was promptly nullified, however, as ...


Hoopa Valley Tribe V. Ferc, Fredrick Aaron Rains 2019 University of Montana

Hoopa Valley Tribe V. Ferc, Fredrick Aaron Rains

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In Hoopa Valley Tribe v. FERC, the Hoopa Valley Tribe challenged the intentional and continual delay of state water quality certification review of water discharged from a series of dams on the Klamath River in California and Oregon. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the states of Oregon and California, and PacifiCorp, a hydroelectric operator, were implementing an administrative scheme designed to circumvent a one-year temporal requirement for review imposed on states by the Clean Water Act. This scheme allowed PacifiCorp to operate the series of dams for over a decade without proper state water quality certification. The United States Court ...


Save Our Sound Obx, Inc. V. North Carolina Department Of Transportation, Mitch L. WerBell V 2019 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Save Our Sound Obx, Inc. V. North Carolina Department Of Transportation, Mitch L. Werbell V

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled in favor of several governmental agencies seeking to construct a new bridge in the Pamlico Sound adjacent to North Carolina’s Outer Banks. For years, state and federal agencies have put forth a massive coordinated effort to address the constant weather damage and erosion which occurs to a section of North Carolina Highway 12. The court found the agencies properly cleared NEPA’s environmental review requirements for the bridge’s construction. Additionally, the opponent-litigants’ efforts to add claims challenging the project, based on new information about a shipwreck in the bridge’s ...


Enough Is Enough: Ten Years Of Carcieri V. Salazar, Bethany C. Sullivan, Jennifer L. Turner 2019 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Enough Is Enough: Ten Years Of Carcieri V. Salazar, Bethany C. Sullivan, Jennifer L. Turner

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Ten years ago, the United States Supreme Court issued its watershed decision in Carcieri v. Salazar, landing a gut punch to Indian country. Through that decision, the Supreme Court upended decades of Department of the Interior regulations, policy, and practice related to the eligibility of all federally recognized tribes for the restoration of tribal homelands through the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) of 1934. The Court held that tribes must demonstrate that they were “under federal jurisdiction” in 1934 to qualify for land into trust under the first definition of “Indian” in the IRA. Carcieri has impacted all tribes by upending ...


The New State Zoning: Land Use Preemption Amid A Housing Crisis, John Infranca 2019 Suffolk University Law School

The New State Zoning: Land Use Preemption Amid A Housing Crisis, John Infranca

Boston College Law Review

Commentators have long decried the pernicious effects that overly restrictive land use regulations, which stifle new development, have on housing supply and affordability, regional and national economic growth, social mobility, and racial integration. The fragmented nature of zoning rules in the United States, which are set primarily at the local level, renders it seemingly impossible to address these concerns systematically. Although there have been some efforts to address local exclusionary tendencies and their suboptimal effects by means of greater state control, these efforts, which remain contentious, have been limited to just a few states. In the past few years, a ...


The U.S. Military’S Environmental Protection Efforts: Unexpected Eco-Friendly Solutions To Land Management Problems, Curtis Cranston 2019 Boston College Law School

The U.S. Military’S Environmental Protection Efforts: Unexpected Eco-Friendly Solutions To Land Management Problems, Curtis Cranston

Boston College Law Review

The military’s historically destructive relationship with the environment and its several national security exemptions from compliance with federal environmental laws would appear to indicate that the military’s mission is inherently at odds with environmental protection. Nevertheless, the U.S. Department of Defense (“DoD”) has recently demonstrated a significant interest in ensuring military readiness by reducing potential impediments to normal military operations on DoD installations. Often cumulatively referred to as “encroachment,” these outside pressures include land-use restrictions from federal environmental laws as well as more direct interference from nearby civilian populations, such as noise complaints and light pollution. By ...


Density, Affordable Housing And Social Inclusion: A Modest Proposal For Cape Town, Colin Crawford 2019 Tulane University Law School

Density, Affordable Housing And Social Inclusion: A Modest Proposal For Cape Town, Colin Crawford

Colin Crawford

No abstract provided.


A Comparative Consideration Of Development Charges In Cape Town, Colin Crawford, Julian Conrad Juergensmeyer 2019 Tulane University Law School

A Comparative Consideration Of Development Charges In Cape Town, Colin Crawford, Julian Conrad Juergensmeyer

Colin Crawford

No abstract provided.


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