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Corporate Lessons For Public Governance: The Origins And Activities Of The National Budget Committee, 1919–1923, Jesse Tarbert 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Corporate Lessons For Public Governance: The Origins And Activities Of The National Budget Committee, 1919–1923, Jesse Tarbert

Seattle University Law Review

There is a peculiar disconnect between the way specialists view the 1920s and the way the decade is understood by non-specialists and the general public. Casual observers tend to view the 1920s as a conservative or reactionary interlude between the watershed reform periods of the Progressive Era and New Deal. Although many scholars have abandoned the traditional view of the 1920s, their work has not yet penetrated the generalizations of non-specialists. Even readers familiar with specialist accounts portraying the New Era as the age of “corporate liberalism” or the “Associative State” tend to view these concepts as just another way ...


The Modern Corporation And Private Property Revisited: Gardiner Means And The Administered Price, William W. Bratton 2019 Seattle University School of Law

The Modern Corporation And Private Property Revisited: Gardiner Means And The Administered Price, William W. Bratton

Seattle University Law Review

This essay casts additional light on The Modern Corporation’s corporatist precincts, shifting attention to the book’s junior coauthor, Gardiner C. Means. Means is accurately remembered as the generator of Book I’s statistical showings—the description of deepening corporate concentration and widening separation of ownership and control. He is otherwise more notable for his absence than his presence in today’s discussions of The Modern Corporation. This essay fills this gap, describing the junior coauthor’s central concern—a theory of administered prices set out in a Ph.D. dissertation Means submitted to the Harvard economics department after ...


“All Lawyers Are Somewhat Suspect”: Adolf A. Berle And The Modern Legal Profession, Harwell Wells 2019 Seattle University School of Law

“All Lawyers Are Somewhat Suspect”: Adolf A. Berle And The Modern Legal Profession, Harwell Wells

Seattle University Law Review

Adolf A. Berle was perhaps the preeminent scholar of the modern corporation. He was also an occasional scholar of the modern legal profession. This Article surveys his writings on the legal profession from the 1930s to the 1960s, from the sharp criticisms he leveled at lawyers, particularly corporate lawyers, during the Great Depression, to his sunnier account of the lawyer’s role in the postwar era. I argue that Berle’s views were shaped both by the reformist tradition he inherited from Louis Brandeis and his writings on the corporation, which left him convinced that the fate of the legal ...


Adolf Berle During The New Deal: The Brain Truster As An Intellectual Jobber, Robert B. Thompson 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Adolf Berle During The New Deal: The Brain Truster As An Intellectual Jobber, Robert B. Thompson

Seattle University Law Review

Adolf Berle’s ideas have attained a remarkable longevity in corporate law with an influence exceeding that of any other twentieth century law professor. Participants in the now ten Berle symposia often have framed the discussion of his career as an intellectual history, usually built around the powerful transformative effect of The Modern Corporation and Private Property (MCPP). Yet this approach is insufficient to explain large parts of Berle’s professional career, including what Berle did during the twelve years of the Roosevelt Administration that immediately followed MCPP. This Article offers an alternative focus that better accounts for the career ...


Collected Lectures And Talks On Corporate Law, Legal Theory, History, Finance, And Governance, William W. Bratton 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Collected Lectures And Talks On Corporate Law, Legal Theory, History, Finance, And Governance, William W. Bratton

Seattle University Law Review

A collection of eighteen speeches and lectures, from 2003 to 2018, discussing and expanding on the writings and theories of Adolf Berle and Gardiner Means.


The Thirteenth Amendment, Prison Labor Wages, And Interrupting The Intergenerational Cycle Of Subjugation, Josh Halladay 2019 Seattle University School of Law

The Thirteenth Amendment, Prison Labor Wages, And Interrupting The Intergenerational Cycle Of Subjugation, Josh Halladay

Seattle University Law Review

This Comment argues that meager or no compensation for prisoners, who are disproportionately black and other persons of color, entraps them and their children in a cycle of subjugation that dates back to the days of slavery, and this Comment proposes to interrupt this cycle by setting a minimum wage for prisoners and creating college savings accounts for their children. As part of the cycle, when people enter prisons and the doors behind them close, so do their families’ bank accounts and the doors to their children’s schools. At the same time, the cells next to them open, ready ...


Panel 1: Democracy And Work, Christopher David Ruiz Cameron, Richard Bales, Ellen Dannin, Robert Hebdon, Ariana Levinson, Michael Wasser, Ryan Lamare 2019 Southwestern University School of Law

Panel 1: Democracy And Work, Christopher David Ruiz Cameron, Richard Bales, Ellen Dannin, Robert Hebdon, Ariana Levinson, Michael Wasser, Ryan Lamare

Ariana R. Levinson

Moderator: Christopher David Ruiz Cameron

Panelists:

Richard Bales: Workplace Populism

Christopher David Ruiz Cameron: Democracy at Large and Democracy at Work: Four Models of Workplace Governance

Ellen Dannin: Work in a Democratic Society: Not Just Jobs, but Good Jobs

Robert Hebdon: Freedom of Association as a Fundamental Human Right

Ariana Levinson: Movements of Consensus and Conflict: Founding Worker Cooperatives

Michael Wasser & Ryan Lamare: Unions as Conduits of Democratic Voice for Non-elites: Work Politicization from the Shop Floor to the Halls of Congress


Defined Contribution Plans And The Challenge Of Financial Illiteracy, Jill E. Fisch, Annamaria Lusardi, Andrea Hasler 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Defined Contribution Plans And The Challenge Of Financial Illiteracy, Jill E. Fisch, Annamaria Lusardi, Andrea Hasler

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Retirement investing in the United States has changed dramatically. The classic defined-benefit (DB) plan has largely been replaced by the defined contribution (DC) plan. With the latter, individual employees’ decisions about how much to save for retirement and how to invest those savings determine the benefits available upon retirement.

We analyze data from the 2015 National Financial Capability Study to show that people whose only exposure to investment decisions is by virtue of their participation in an employer-sponsored 401(k) plan are poorly equipped to make sound investment decisions. Specifically, they suffer from higher levels of financial illiteracy than other ...


The Metastasization Of Mandatory Arbitration, Alexander J.S. Colvin 2019 Cornell University

The Metastasization Of Mandatory Arbitration, Alexander J.S. Colvin

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Mandatory arbitration procedures have expanded to become a common feature of American employment relations. This article presents the results of a new original survey examining the extent of mandatory arbitration, where it is most commonly used, and which employees it is most likely to affect. Overall, 53.9 percent of private sector business establishments, representing 56.2 percent of nonunion employees, have mandatory arbitration procedures. Larger employers are more likely to have adopted mandatory arbitration, as are workplaces with lower paid employees. Mandatory arbitration is particularly common in California, North Carolina, and Texas, but is widespread nationwide. Class action waivers ...


Hushing Contracts, David A. Hoffman, Eric Lampmann 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Hushing Contracts, David A. Hoffman, Eric Lampmann

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The last few years have brought a renewed appreciation of the costs of nondisclosure agreements that suppress information about sexual wrongdoing. Recently passed bills in a number of states, including New York and California, has attempted to deal with such hush contracts. But such legislation is often incomplete, and many courts and commentators continue to ask if victims of harassment can sign enforceable settlements that conceal serious, potentially metastasizing, social harms. In this Article, we argue that employing the public policy doctrine, courts ought to generally refuse to enforce hush agreements, especially those created by organizations. We restate public policy ...


Surveying The Scene: How Representatives’ Views Informed A New Era In Irish Workplace Dispute Resolution, Brian Barry 2019 Technological University Dublin

Surveying The Scene: How Representatives’ Views Informed A New Era In Irish Workplace Dispute Resolution, Brian Barry

Articles

The Workplace Relations Act 2015 introduced a major overhaul of workplace dispute resolution bodies in Ireland, streamlining a complicated system for resolving workplace disputes comprising multiple fora into a two-tier structure. The article describes and analyses the results of two surveys undertaken by the author of the views of employment law and industrial relations practitioners and other representatives in Ireland before the reforms in 2011 and after the reforms in 2016. This article describes the purpose, methodology and considers the results of both surveys. The 2011 survey informed the agenda for reforming the Irish workplace dispute resolution system in 2015 ...


Lean Weeks And Fat Weeks: A Commissioned Employee's Regular Rate Of Overtime Pay, Colt Burnett 2019 Georgia State University College of Law

Lean Weeks And Fat Weeks: A Commissioned Employee's Regular Rate Of Overtime Pay, Colt Burnett

Georgia State University Law Review

This Note focuses on the uncertainty inherent in overtime calculations for certain categories of employees who earn commission in addition to hourly wages. Part I of this Note gives the relevant history behind overtime and “regular rate” calculation. Part II analyzes the different methods of determining an employee’s regular rate of pay in the Seventh and Eleventh United States Circuit Courts of Appeals. Part III proposes for a uniform approach to deferred commission allocation in overtime calculation, advocating the Eleventh Circuit’s method because it more closely follows the aims of the FLSA and because the Department of Labor ...


Automatic Reaction - What Happens To Workers At Firms That Automate?, James Bessen, Martin Goos, Anna Salomons, Wiljan van den Berge 2019 Boston University School of Law

Automatic Reaction - What Happens To Workers At Firms That Automate?, James Bessen, Martin Goos, Anna Salomons, Wiljan Van Den Berge

Faculty Scholarship

We provide the first estimate of the impacts of automation on individual workers by combining Dutch micro-data with a direct measure of automation expenditures covering firms in all private non-financial industries over 2000-2016. Using an event study differences-indifferences design, we find that automation at the firm increases the probability of workers separating from their employers and decreases days worked, leading to a 5-year cumulative wage income loss of about 8% of one year’s earnings for incumbent workers. We find little change in wage rates. Further, lost wage earnings are only partially offset by various benefits systems and are disproportionately ...


The Discrimination Presumption, Joseph A. Seiner 2019 University of South Carolina School of Law

The Discrimination Presumption, Joseph A. Seiner

Notre Dame Law Review

Employment discrimination is a fact in our society. Scientific studies continue to show that employer misconduct in the workplace is pervasive. This social science research is further supported by governmental data and litigation statistics. Even in the face of this evidence, however, it has never been more difficult to successfully bring a claim of employment discrimination. After the Supreme Court’s controversial decisions in Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly and Ashcroft v. Iqbal, all civil litigants must sufficiently plead enough facts to give rise to a plausible claim. Empirical studies show that this plausibility test has been rigidly applied in ...


A Study Of Factors Influencing Hiring Decisions In The Context Of Ban The Box Policies, Ronald F. Day 2019 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

A Study Of Factors Influencing Hiring Decisions In The Context Of Ban The Box Policies, Ronald F. Day

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation investigates whether NYC employers adhered to Ban the Box by removing the question about criminal history from employment forms, by refraining from inquiring about an applicant’s criminal record during the interview process, and by complying with other aspects of the policy. The study also documents employer perspectives on Ban the Box and on the hiring of individuals with criminal convictions, and examines whether more individuals with a criminal record were hired after the policy was implemented.

Using a mixed-methods approach, surveys were administered to companies in the nonprofit and private sectors, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with ...


Likes And Retweets Can't Save Your Job: Public Employee Privacy, Free Speech, And Social Media, Frank E. Langan 2019 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Likes And Retweets Can't Save Your Job: Public Employee Privacy, Free Speech, And Social Media, Frank E. Langan

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Employee Right To Disconnect, Paul M. Secunda 2019 Marquette University Law School

The Employee Right To Disconnect, Paul M. Secunda

Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law

U.S. workers are increasingly finding it difficult to escape from work. Through their smartphones, e-mail, and social media, work tethers them to their workstations well after the work day has ended. Whether at home or in transit, employers are asking or requiring employees to complete assignments, tasks, and projects outside of working hours. This practice has a profound detrimental impact on employee privacy and autonomy, safety and health, productivity and compensation, and rest and leisure. France and Germany have responded to this emerging workplace issue by taking different legal approaches to providing their employees a right to disconnect from ...


Bombardier Transp. Usa, Inc. V. Nev. Labor Comm’R; The Int’L Union Of Elevator Constructors; And Clark County, 135 Nev., Adv. Op. 3 (Jan. 17, 2019), Amanda Stafford 2019 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Bombardier Transp. Usa, Inc. V. Nev. Labor Comm’R; The Int’L Union Of Elevator Constructors; And Clark County, 135 Nev., Adv. Op. 3 (Jan. 17, 2019), Amanda Stafford

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court found Nevada’s wage law requirement for a “public work” applies to construction of the airport shuttle system. The Labor Commissioner did qualify the work as a “public work” because it is repair work and found that twenty percent of the work involved repair rather than maintenance so NRS § 338.010(15) does apply.


Labor Law, Antitrust Law, And Economics Professors' Comment On The National Labor Relations Board's Proposed Joint-Employer Rule, Hiba Hafiz, Brishen Rogers, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Kate Bronfenbrenner 2019 Boston College Law School

Labor Law, Antitrust Law, And Economics Professors' Comment On The National Labor Relations Board's Proposed Joint-Employer Rule, Hiba Hafiz, Brishen Rogers, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Kate Bronfenbrenner

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Comment drafted to the National Labor Relations Board's request for comment on a proposed rule-making to define what constitutes a "joint employer" for the purposes of the National Labor Relations Act's strictures.


Redefining Workplace Speech After Janus, Theo A. Lesczynski 2019 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Redefining Workplace Speech After Janus, Theo A. Lesczynski

Northwestern University Law Review

We have a First Amendment right to criticize the government. But this freedom does not translate into a right to criticize one’s boss even if, as for millions of Americans, one’s boss happens to be a government employer. Public employee speech doctrine has long established wide latitude for public employers to supervise their workers. Employees must show at the threshold that their speech was on a matter of public concern and not an internal workplace matter. The Supreme Court’s pronouncements over the last decade in a related doctrinal area, however, have unsettled the line demarcating workplace speech ...


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