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“Just When I Thought I Was Out . . . .”: Post-Employment Repayment Obligations, Stuart Lichten, Eric M. Fink 2019 Lichten & Bright, P.C.

“Just When I Thought I Was Out . . . .”: Post-Employment Repayment Obligations, Stuart Lichten, Eric M. Fink

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

The common law doctrine of “employment at will” has dominated U.S. employment law for over a century. Pursuant to this concept, an employer may discharge an employee at any time for any reason, or for no reason at all. An employee may similarly resign at any time for any reason, or for no reason at all. Despite the rule’s facial even-handedness, it operates against the background of “the deeply rooted conception of the employment relation as a dominant-servient relation rather than one of mutual rights and obligations.” Within that relationship, “the employer [has] the right to impose any ...


The Efficacy Of New York's Qualified Prohibition On Ndas And Reforms That Can Protect Sexual Harassment Survivors, Bina Nayee 2019 Fordham University School of Law

The Efficacy Of New York's Qualified Prohibition On Ndas And Reforms That Can Protect Sexual Harassment Survivors, Bina Nayee

Fordham Law Review Online

The numerous sexual harassment scandals that were uncovered following the Harvey Weinstein exposé have at least one very positive byproduct: new state legislation aimed to protect and combat sexual misconduct in the workplace. New York is leading the charge by creating a legislative framework that protects a broader spectrum of workers against sexual harassment in the workplace. The State’s 2019 fiscal year budget substantiates the commitment to empower survivors and protect those who may be future targets of sexual harassment in their workplaces. As part of this framework, the State’s human rights laws now extend to and protect ...


Split Over Sex: Federal Circuits And Executive Agencies Split Over Sexual Orientation Discrimination Under Title Vii, Darria Turner 2019 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Split Over Sex: Federal Circuits And Executive Agencies Split Over Sexual Orientation Discrimination Under Title Vii, Darria Turner

Catholic University Law Review

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 expressly prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of an individual’s sex. Since its enactment, neither Congress nor the Supreme Court has definitively stated whether sex discrimination based on sexual orientation is protected under Title VII. Though the judicial interpretation of sex has evolved, courts have routinely held that the protections of Title VII do not extend to claims based on sexual orientation discrimination. As three circuits faced these claims, a split was created in the circuits as well as in the two agencies tasked with the enforcement of Title VII ...


An Empirical Study Of Fast-Food Franchsing Contracts: Towards A New "Intermediary" Theory Of Joint Employment, Kati L. Griffith 2019 University of Washington School of Law

An Empirical Study Of Fast-Food Franchsing Contracts: Towards A New "Intermediary" Theory Of Joint Employment, Kati L. Griffith

Washington Law Review

The “Fight for Fifteen and a Union” movement among fast-food workers and their allies has raised awareness about wage inequality in the United States. Rather than negotiating for better wages and working conditions with economically weak restaurant-level franchisees, the movement aims to affect the practices of what they view as the all-powerful brands—the franchisors. Few would dispute the notion that the franchisor brands, not their franchisees, set industry-wide standards and, thus, have the ability to offset rising wage inequality and improve working conditions. And yet, the movement has raised controversial law and policy questions about the legal responsibilities of ...


The Workers' Constitution, Luke Norris 2019 University of Richmond School of Law

The Workers' Constitution, Luke Norris

Fordham Law Review

This Article argues that the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, Social Security Act of 1935, and Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 should be understood as a “workers’ constitution.” The Article tells the history of how a connected wave of social movements responded to the insecurity that wage earners faced after the Industrial Revolution and Great Depression by working with government officials to bring about federal collective bargaining rights, wage and hour legislation, and social security legislation. It argues that the statutes are tied together as a set of “small c” constitutional commitments in both their histories and theory ...


Monetary Liability Of Public School Employees Under The Idea And Section 504/Ada, Perry A. Zirkel 2019 Brigham Young University Law School

Monetary Liability Of Public School Employees Under The Idea And Section 504/Ada, Perry A. Zirkel

Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Armed And Dangerous - Teachers? A Policy Response To Security In Our Public Schools, Todd A. DeMitchell, Christine C. Rath 2019 Brigham Young University Law School

Armed And Dangerous - Teachers? A Policy Response To Security In Our Public Schools, Todd A. Demitchell, Christine C. Rath

Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Common Ownership And Executive Incentives: The Implausibility Of Compensation As An Anticompetitive Mechanism, David Walker 2019 Boston Univeristy School of Law

Common Ownership And Executive Incentives: The Implausibility Of Compensation As An Anticompetitive Mechanism, David Walker

Faculty Scholarship

Mutual funds, pension funds and other institutional investors are a growing presence in U.S. equity markets, and these investors frequently hold large stakes in shares of competing companies. Because these common owners might prefer to maximize the values of their portfolios of companies, rather than the value of individual companies in isolation, this new reality has lead to a concern that companies in concentrated industries with high degrees of common ownership might compete less vigorously with each other than they otherwise would. But what mechanism would link common ownership with reduced competition? Some commentators argue that one of the ...


Worker Collective Action In The Time Of Fissuring: Independent Contractorlabor Boycotts, The Thirteenth Amendment, And Antitrust Law, Richard Blum 2019 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Worker Collective Action In The Time Of Fissuring: Independent Contractorlabor Boycotts, The Thirteenth Amendment, And Antitrust Law, Richard Blum

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Slavery, Liberty, And The Right To Contract, Rebecca E. Zietlow 2019 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Slavery, Liberty, And The Right To Contract, Rebecca E. Zietlow

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Thirteenth Amendment And Minimum Wage Laws, Ruben J. Garcia 2019 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

The Thirteenth Amendment And Minimum Wage Laws, Ruben J. Garcia

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Bias, Employment Discrimination, And Black Women's Hair: Another Way Forward, Crystal Powell 2019 Brigham Young University Law School

Bias, Employment Discrimination, And Black Women's Hair: Another Way Forward, Crystal Powell

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Extending The Sex-Plus Discrimination Doctrine To Age Discrimination Claims Involving Multiple Discriminatory Motives, Marc Chase McAllister 2019 Texas State University

Extending The Sex-Plus Discrimination Doctrine To Age Discrimination Claims Involving Multiple Discriminatory Motives, Marc Chase Mcallister

Boston College Law Review

Federal employment discrimination statutes make it unlawful to discriminate against employees on the basis of certain protected characteristics, including race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, and age. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an employer may not discriminate against an employee based on a combination of two protected traits, such as race and sex. Nevertheless, these claims—which this Article refers to as multiple-motive claims—tend to fail when one of the protected traits is age. Whether brought under Title VII or under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), this Article argues ...


California Wine Industry Feels The Effect Of Trump, Golden Gate University Law Review 2019 Golden Gate University School of Law

California Wine Industry Feels The Effect Of Trump, Golden Gate University Law Review

GGU Law Review Blog

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.” This was much of the tone about immigrants during Donald Trump’s speeches on his campaign trail. Since President Trump took office, it seems that immigration has propelled to the forefront of political debates and water cooler talk. Most of the headlines regarding immigration that have dominated our screens have been about children being separated at the border, Trump’s disapproval ...


Berle X: Berle And His World: An Homage To William W. Bratton, Charles R. T. O'Kelley 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Berle X: Berle And His World: An Homage To William W. Bratton, Charles R. T. O'Kelley

Seattle University Law Review

An introduction to the Berle X symposium, honoring William W. (Bill) Bratton.


Made For This Moment: The Enduring Relevance Of Adolf Berle’S Belief In A Global New Deal, Leo E. Strine Jr. 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Made For This Moment: The Enduring Relevance Of Adolf Berle’S Belief In A Global New Deal, Leo E. Strine Jr.

Seattle University Law Review

At a time when the insecurity of working people in the United States and Europe is being exploited by nativist forces, the concept of a global New Deal is more relevant than ever. But, instead of a global New Deal, the predominant force in international trade in recent decades has been spreading pre-New Deal, laissez-faire approaches to markets, without extending with equal vigor the regulations essential to providing ordinary people economic security. Adolf Berle recognized that if the economy did not work for all, the worst impulses in humanity could be exploited by demagogues and authoritarians, having seen this first ...


Looking Forward In A Failing World: Adolf A. Berle, Jr., The United States, And Global Order In The Interwar Years, Jessica Wang 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Looking Forward In A Failing World: Adolf A. Berle, Jr., The United States, And Global Order In The Interwar Years, Jessica Wang

Seattle University Law Review

This essay explores Berle’s understanding of American power and its relationship to global order in the era between the First and Second World Wars. I first survey the history of progressive internationalism in the 1920s in order to situate Berle’s approach to U.S. foreign relations and global affairs, before proceeding to a close examination of Berle’s immediate response to the aftermath of World War I, and then his foreign policy activities as part of the Roosevelt administration in the late 1930s and early 1940s. My analysis focuses in particular on his public efforts to promote a ...


Quasi Governments And Inchoate Law: Berle’S Vision Of Limits On Corporate Power, Elizabeth Pollman 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Quasi Governments And Inchoate Law: Berle’S Vision Of Limits On Corporate Power, Elizabeth Pollman

Seattle University Law Review

This Berle X Symposium essay gives prominence to distinguished corporate law scholar Adolf A. Berle, Jr. and his key writings of the 1950s and 1960s. Berle is most famous for his work decades earlier, in the 1930s, with Gardiner Means on the topic of the separation of ownership and control, and for his great debate of corporate social responsibility with E. Merrick Dodd. Yet the world was inching closer to our contemporary one in terms of both business and technology in Berle’s later years and his work from this period deserves attention.


Democracy In America At Work: The History Of Labor’S Vote In Corporate Governance, Ewan McGaughey 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Democracy In America At Work: The History Of Labor’S Vote In Corporate Governance, Ewan Mcgaughey

Seattle University Law Review

Can there be democracy in America at work? The historical division between democracy in politics and hierarchy in the economy is under strain. Hierarchical interests in the economy are shifting their model of power into politics, and yet a commitment to revive the law is resurgent. Central examples are the proposed Accountable Capitalism Act, Reward Work Act, Workplace Democracy Acts, and Employees’ Pension Security Acts. They would create a right for employees to elect 40% of directors on $1 billion company boards, a right for employees to elect one-third of directors on other listed company boards and require one-half employee ...


A Prescription For Charity Care: How National Medical Debt Ills Can Be Alleviated By Integrating State Financial Assistance Policies Into The Nonprofit Tax Exemption, Margarita Kutsin 2019 Seattle University School of Law

A Prescription For Charity Care: How National Medical Debt Ills Can Be Alleviated By Integrating State Financial Assistance Policies Into The Nonprofit Tax Exemption, Margarita Kutsin

Seattle University Law Review

Despite having the most expensive healthcare system in the world, the United States has been consistently ranked as having the worst system in terms of equity, efficiency, and healthcare outcomes among industrialized nations. The effects of these systemic issues are grounded in the patient experience as nearly forty-four percent of individuals have forgone recommended treatments and thirty-two percent have reported that they were unable to afford a prescription due to the high cost, according to a study conducted in 2018. Health is sacred, and financial circumstances should not determine the difference between treatment and illness, or life and death. “Financial ...


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