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Quantifying The Tightness Of Mortgage Credit And Assessing Policy Actions, Laurie S. Goodman 2017 Urban Institute

Quantifying The Tightness Of Mortgage Credit And Assessing Policy Actions, Laurie S. Goodman

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

This Article quantifies the dramatic tightening of mortgage credit that has occurred in the post-crisis period. It then describes the policy actions to loosen the credit box taken to date by both the government sponsored enterprises (GSEs) and their regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), as well as those taken by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), concluding the FHA still has some important actions it has yet to undertake. Finally, the consequences of tight credit are discussed: namely, a lower home ownership rate, particularly among minorities, leaving many unable to access what has historically been the single most powerful ...


Waiting For Homeownership: Assessing The Future Of Homeownership, Jonathan Spader, Christopher Herbert 2017 Joint Center on Housing Studies of Harvard University

Waiting For Homeownership: Assessing The Future Of Homeownership, Jonathan Spader, Christopher Herbert

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

The decade-long decline in the homeownership rate in the United States has generated substantial discussion over its future path. In the face of continued uncertainty, this Article seeks to assess what we know and do not know about the sources of the decline and the likely trajectory of the homeownership rate in coming years. The analyses use the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) of the Current Population Survey for 1985 to 2015 to examine the determinants of changes in the homeownership rate, using shift-share analyses to measure the extent to which changing demographics explain the observed changes. The results ...


One Mortgage: A Model Of Success For Low-Income Homeownership, Clark L. Ziegler, Elliot Schmiedl, Thomas Callahan 2017 Massachusetts Housing Partnership

One Mortgage: A Model Of Success For Low-Income Homeownership, Clark L. Ziegler, Elliot Schmiedl, Thomas Callahan

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

A 1989 report by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston identified major racial disparities in mortgage lending in the City of Boston that could not be explained by income, credit scores, or other objective underwriting factors. In response, city and state officials, community organizations, and major banking institutions joined together in 1990 to design and launch what is now the Massachusetts ONE Mortgage program. The program is built around a low down payment mortgage loan with discounted interest rates, a state funded loan loss reserve that eliminates the need for mortgage insurance, retention of servicing and credit risk by the ...


Why Cyclicality Matters To Access To Mortgage Credit, Patricia A. McCoy, Susan M. Wachter 2017 Boston College Law School

Why Cyclicality Matters To Access To Mortgage Credit, Patricia A. Mccoy, Susan M. Wachter

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

Virtually no attention has been paid to the problem of cyclicality in debates over access to mortgage credit, despite its importance as a driver of tight credit. Housing markets are prone to booms accompanied by bubbles in mortgage credit in which lenders cut underwriting standards, leading to elevated loan defaults. During downturns, these cycles artificially impede access to mortgage credit for underserved communities. During upswings, these cycles make homeownership unnecessarily precarious for many who attain it. This volatility exacerbates wealth and income disparities by ethnicity and race. The boom-bust cycle must be addressed in order to assure healthy and sustainable ...


The Housing Market Cannot Fully Recover Without A Robust Rental Policy, Michael A. Stegman 2017 Bipartisan Policy Center

The Housing Market Cannot Fully Recover Without A Robust Rental Policy, Michael A. Stegman

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

There is no one explanation for why access to mortgage credit remains so tight this far into the housing recovery, nor is there a consensus on why our national homeownership rate has fallen to a fifty-year low, but one thing is clear: the homeownership and rental markets are two sides of the same coin. As such, policymakers must understand that pressures and problems in one have implications for the other. As we disentangle and address the interwoven causes of our credit access and homeownership challenges, we do have a set of affordable rental policies and programs, proven effective and informed ...


Out Of House And Home: The Disparate Application Of Louisiana’S Eviction Laws To Mobile Home Owners, Jared A. Clark 2017 Louisiana State University Law Center

Out Of House And Home: The Disparate Application Of Louisiana’S Eviction Laws To Mobile Home Owners, Jared A. Clark

Louisiana Law Review

The article focuses on the mobile home eviction laws in Louisiana and discusses disparate application of Louisiana's eviction laws to mobile home owners, background on mobile homes and the demographics of the people who own these homes; and problems caused by these laws to mobile home owners.


The Civil Asset Forfeiture Program An Analysis Of The Actual Use, Racial Subjectivity, And Unfairness To Lower Earning Individuals, Nicholas Schieber 2017 La Salle University

The Civil Asset Forfeiture Program An Analysis Of The Actual Use, Racial Subjectivity, And Unfairness To Lower Earning Individuals, Nicholas Schieber

Economic Crime Forensics Capstones

Being able to seize property without a criminal conviction has become a hot button topic in periodical and academic papers. The Civil Asset Forfeiture program gave law enforcement the ability to seize “guilty” property, which can be defined as contraband, proceeds from criminal activity, or tools and instrumentalities used in the commission of a crime, without a criminal conviction on the part of the owner. Numerous academic authors and journalists have called for reform, racial unfairness, and targeting of lower earning communities. However, the majority of data regarding the Civil Asset Forfeiture program is qualitative in nature with few quantitative ...


Living Tiny Legally, James G. Rollin 2017 James Madison University

Living Tiny Legally, James G. Rollin

Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

Over the last 40 years, the average new United States house has increased in size by more than 1,000 square feet, from an average size of 1,660 square feet in 1973 (earliest year available from the Census Bureau) to 2,687 square feet last year (Perry, 2016). In that same time period, there was a 91% increase in home square footage per inhabitant and a decrease in average household size. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average home in the United States costs approximately $358,000 to build, an increase of roughly $200,000 since 1998 ...


I Share, Therefore It's Mine, Donald J. Kochan 2017 Chapman University School of Law

I Share, Therefore It's Mine, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

Uniquely interconnecting lessons from law, psychology, and economics, this article aims to provide a more enriched understanding of what it means to “share” property in the sharing economy. It explains that there is an “ownership prerequisite” to the sharing of property, drawing in part from the findings of research in the psychology of child development to show when and why children start to share. They do so only after developing what psychologists call “ownership understanding.” What the psychological research reveals, then, is that the property system is well suited to create recognizable and enforceable ownership norms that include the rights ...


The Missouri Student Transfer Program, Howard E. Fields III 2017 University Missouri - St. Louis

The Missouri Student Transfer Program, Howard E. Fields Iii

Dissertations

In 1993, the state of Missouri passed the Outstanding Schools Act. This law was created as a means to ensure that “all children will have quality educational opportunities, regardless of where in Missouri they live.” Section 167.131 of this law states that an unaccredited district must pay the tuition and transportation cost for students who attend an accredited school in the same or adjoining district. This portion of the law became known as the Student Transfer Program.

The Riverview Gardens School District (RGSD) was one of three unaccredited school districts in the state of Missouri in 2013. With close ...


Housing For The Elderly - 202 Program, Richard M. Millman 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Housing For The Elderly - 202 Program, Richard M. Millman

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Evicted: The Socio-Legal Case For The Right To Housing, Lisa T. Alexander 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Evicted: The Socio-Legal Case For The Right To Housing, Lisa T. Alexander

Lisa T. Alexander

Matthew Desmond's Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City is a triumphant work that provides the missing socio-legal data needed to prove why America should recognize housing as a human right. Desmond's masterful study of the effect of evictions on Milwaukee's urban poor in the wake of the 2008 U.S. housing crisis humanizes the evicted, and their landlords, through rich and detailed ethnographies. His intimate portrayals teach Evicted's readers about the agonizingly difficult choices that low-income, unsubsidized tenants must make in the private rental market. Evicted also reveals the contradictions between "law on the ...


Barriers To Housing Equality For The Lgbt Community: A Literature Review, Carissa Lavin 2017 Georgia State University

Barriers To Housing Equality For The Lgbt Community: A Literature Review, Carissa Lavin

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Of Asthma And Ashtrays: Examining The Rights Of And Exploring Ways To Protect Maine Tenants Living In Multi-Unit Rental Housing Who Are Involuntarily Exposed To Secondhand Tobacco Smoke In Their Homes, Amy K. Olfene 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Of Asthma And Ashtrays: Examining The Rights Of And Exploring Ways To Protect Maine Tenants Living In Multi-Unit Rental Housing Who Are Involuntarily Exposed To Secondhand Tobacco Smoke In Their Homes, Amy K. Olfene

Maine Law Review

Toxins found in tobacco smoke are deadly, and there is no safe level of exposure. Secondhand smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, 69 of which are known to cause cancer in humans. In fact, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) has declared secondhand tobacco smoke a Group A carcinogen, a rating “reserved for those compounds or mixtures which have been shown to cause cancer in humans, based on studies in human populations.” Exposure to tobacco smoke can cause a number of diseases and ailments in both smokers and nonsmokers; in addition, such exposure can exacerbate existing illnesses. In the ...


Embracing Airbnb: How Cities Can Champion Private Property Rights Without Compromising The Health And Welfare Of The Community, Emily M. Speier 2017 Pepperdine University

Embracing Airbnb: How Cities Can Champion Private Property Rights Without Compromising The Health And Welfare Of The Community, Emily M. Speier

Pepperdine Law Review

Peer-to-peer services offer participants considerable advantages whether they are a provider of such services or a user of them. The Airbnb phenomenon is an example of how technological advancement has transformed the rental industry and has signaled a societal acceptance of a sharing economy. However, the question now is to what extent cities should regulate this influx of short-term rentals while still preserving the property rights of homeowners. Much of the answer to this question depends on each city’s individual interpretation of specific areas of the law. Some legal issues raised by regulation and explored by this article include ...


A Narrowing Of Section 1983 Claims: How Gonzaga Has Limited Recovery For Victims Of Lead Poisoning In Federal Court, Anna Snook 2017 Boston College Law School

A Narrowing Of Section 1983 Claims: How Gonzaga Has Limited Recovery For Victims Of Lead Poisoning In Federal Court, Anna Snook

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

Dellita Johnson brought a claim against the City of Detroit on behalf of her minor son, asserting that her son sustained lead poisoning from the public housing unit in which they lived. She brought claims under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 for the deprivation of federal rights created under provisions of the United States Housing Act, the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act, and administrative regulations created under those statutes. The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit affirmed the District Court’s dismissal of Ms. Johnson’s claims, holding that the applicable provisions of the United States Housing ...


Priority Of Condominium Associations’ Assessment Liens Vis–À–Vis Mortgages: Navigating In The Super-Priority Lien Jurisdictions, Aušra Gaigalaitė 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Priority Of Condominium Associations’ Assessment Liens Vis–À–Vis Mortgages: Navigating In The Super-Priority Lien Jurisdictions, Aušra Gaigalaitė

Seattle University Law Review

This Note will discuss the issues concerning laws regulating lien priority in association foreclosure sales and argue that lenders, because they are in the best position to do so, should implement proactive strategies to protect their interests in association foreclosures. Part I provides an overview of uniform law development and a history of Washington’s governing laws with a focus on recent problems relating to association lien priority. Part II presents analysis of the important court decisions applying the lien priority statute and discussion regarding current and proposed Washington law. Finally, Part III discusses potential solutions lenders should implement to ...


Exploiting The Poor: Housing, Markets, And Vulnerability, Ezra Rosser 2017 American University Washington College of Law

Exploiting The Poor: Housing, Markets, And Vulnerability, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Matthew Desmond provocatively claims that landlords exploit poor tenants in his Pulitzer Prize winning book, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (2016). This essay celebrates Desmond's work and explores the exploitation claim, focusing on how landlords deliberately exploit vulnerable tenants and on forms of market-based exploitation.


An Invisible Crisis In Plain Sight: The Emergence Of The "Eviction Economy," Its Causes, And The Possibilities For Reform In Legal Regulation And Education, David A. Dana 2017 Northwestern University School of Law

An Invisible Crisis In Plain Sight: The Emergence Of The "Eviction Economy," Its Causes, And The Possibilities For Reform In Legal Regulation And Education, David A. Dana

Michigan Law Review

Review of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond.


Rights And Queues: On Distributive Contests In The Modern State, Katharine G. Young 2017 Boston College Law School

Rights And Queues: On Distributive Contests In The Modern State, Katharine G. Young

Katharine G. Young

Two legal concepts have become fundamental to questions of resource allocation in the modern state: rights and queues. As rights are increasingly recognized in areas such as housing, health care, or immigration law, so too are queues used to administer access to the goods, services, or opportunities that realize such rights, especially in conditions of scarcity. This Article is the first to analyze the concept of queues (or temporal waiting lines or lists) and their ambivalent, interdependent relation with rights. After showing the conceptual tension between rights and queues, the Article argues that queues and “queue talk” present a unique ...


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