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3,863 full-text articles. Page 1 of 95.

Symposium Current Issues In Disability Rights Law, Samuel J. Levine 2019 Touro Law Center

Symposium Current Issues In Disability Rights Law, Samuel J. Levine

Samuel J. Levine

No abstract provided.


Educational Environments And The Federal Right To Education In The Wake Of Parkland, Maybell Romero 2019 Northern Illinois University College of Law

Educational Environments And The Federal Right To Education In The Wake Of Parkland, Maybell Romero

University of Miami Law Review

A vociferous debate rages over the measures that should be taken to prevent high-profile incidents of mass school shootings like that at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida on February 14, 2018, or, more recently, that at Santa Fe High School in Texas on May 18, 2018. Heightened security and surveillance measures, such as metal detectors and closed-circuit television (“CCTV”) monitoring, have been proposed in a variety of school districts. These measures, however, have been shown to have only a deleterious effect on learning outcomes and the relationships between students and school faculty, and they may even be hazardous ...


California Rural Legal Assistance Employment Education Outreach Project, Daisy Leon Melendrez 2019 California State University, Monterey Bay

California Rural Legal Assistance Employment Education Outreach Project, Daisy Leon Melendrez

Capstone Projects and Master's Theses

California Rural Legal Assistance is a nonprofit law firm that provides no cost legal services to low-income individuals in Santa Cruz County. The social problem is that too many workers face employment rights violations. The agency problem is a reduction in the number of people seeking employment legal services from CRLA. This outreach project focused on spreading awareness of CRLA’s employment legal services by attending local grocery stores and farmer’s market, with the purpose of promoting agency’s services to the community. Agency materials were distrusted and a questionnaire was used to determine why people are not seeking ...


Racial Indirection, Yuvraj Joshi 2019 Yale Law School

Racial Indirection, Yuvraj Joshi

Yuvraj Joshi

Racial indirection describes practices that produce racially disproportionate results without the overt use of race. This Article demonstrates how racial indirection has allowed — and may continue to allow — efforts to desegregate America’s universities. By analyzing the Supreme Court’s affirmative action cases, the Article shows how specific features of affirmative action doctrine have required and incentivized racial indirection, and how these same features have helped sustain the constitutionality of affirmative action to this point. There is a basic constitutional principle that emerges from these cases: so long as the end is constitutionally permissible, the less direct the reliance on ...


Title Ix And Gender Stereotype Theory: Protecting Students From Parental Status Discrimination, Jocelyn Tillisch 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Title Ix And Gender Stereotype Theory: Protecting Students From Parental Status Discrimination, Jocelyn Tillisch

Seattle University Law Review

This Comment asserts that students who experience discrimination on the basis of parental status have a cause of action under Title IX by using the gender stereotyping theory that is common in Title VII analysis as illustrated by Tingley-Kelley v. Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania. Part I will first provide an overview of the applicable law surrounding Title IX and Title VII. Part II will briefly summarize application of the gender stereotype theory and the applicable case law that provides the legal framework for this proposition. Part III will detail how the Title VII framework can be followed to ...


An Oral History Of St. Mary's University School Of Law (1961–2018), Charles E. Cantú 2019 St. Mary's University School of Law

An Oral History Of St. Mary's University School Of Law (1961–2018), Charles E. Cantú

St. Mary's Law Journal

Dean Emeritus Charles E. Cantú has worked at St. Mary’s University since 1966 when Dean Ernest A. Raba first hired him. He served as the youngest law professor in the nation at the age of twenty-five, and the first full-time Hispanic law professor. After a considerable tenure working at all three locations of St. Mary’s University School of Law and serving under four of the school’s most recent former deans, this article offers his personal recollections and observations of the history of the law school from the 1960s to the present.

This article is the culmination of ...


The 16th Annual Diversity Symposium Dinner, April 4, 2019, Roger Williams University School of Law 2019 Roger Williams University

The 16th Annual Diversity Symposium Dinner, April 4, 2019, Roger Williams University School Of Law

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Return Of The Campus Speech Wars, Thomas Healy 2019 Seton Hall University School of Law

Return Of The Campus Speech Wars, Thomas Healy

Michigan Law Review

Review of Erwin Chemerinsky and Howard Gillman's Free Speech on Campus.


The Supreme Court And Public Schools, Erwin Chemerinsky 2019 University of California, Berkeley School of Law

The Supreme Court And Public Schools, Erwin Chemerinsky

Michigan Law Review

Review of Justin Driver's The Schoolhouse Gate: Public Education, the Supreme Court, and the Battle for the American Mind.


Desegregating Schooling In Hartford, Connecticut: The 1996 Sheff V. O’Neill Court Case And Two Decades Of Integration Policy, Adam Bloom 2019 Trinity College, Hartford Connecticut

Desegregating Schooling In Hartford, Connecticut: The 1996 Sheff V. O’Neill Court Case And Two Decades Of Integration Policy, Adam Bloom

Senior Theses and Projects

No abstract provided.


Cycles Of Failure: The War On Family, The War On Drugs, And The War On Schools Through Hbo’S The Wire, Zachary E. Shapiro, Elizabeth Curran, Rachel C.K. Hutchinson 2019 Yale Law School

Cycles Of Failure: The War On Family, The War On Drugs, And The War On Schools Through Hbo’S The Wire, Zachary E. Shapiro, Elizabeth Curran, Rachel C.K. Hutchinson

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

Freamon, Bodie, and Zenobia’s statements cut straight to the heart of The Wire’s overarching theme: Individuals are trapped in a complex “cycle of harm” where social problems of inequality, crime, and violence are constantly reinforced. The Wire was a television drama that ran on HBO from 2002 through 2008, created by David Simon. The show focuses on the narcotics scene in Baltimore through the perspective of different stakeholders and residents of the city. The Wire highlights how self-perpetuating, interconnected, and broken social institutions act in concert to limit individual opportunity. These institutions squash attempts at reform by punishing ...


Disturbing Disparities: Black Girls And The School-To-Prison Pipeline, Leah A. Hill 2019 Fordham University School of Law

Disturbing Disparities: Black Girls And The School-To-Prison Pipeline, Leah A. Hill

Fordham Law Review Online

Recent scholarship on the school-to-prison pipeline has zeroed in on the disturbing trajectory of black girls. School officials impose harsh punishments on black girls, including suspension and expulsion from school, at alarming rates. The most recent data from the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights reveals that one of the harshest forms of discipline—out of school suspension—is imposed on black girls at seven times the rate of their white peers. In the juvenile justice system, black girls are the fastest growing demographic when it comes to arrest and incarceration. Explanations for the disproportionate disciplinary, arrest ...


Putting Students First: Why Noncitizen Parents Should Be Allowed To Vote In School Board Elections, Jennifer Butwin 2019 Fordham University School of Law

Putting Students First: Why Noncitizen Parents Should Be Allowed To Vote In School Board Elections, Jennifer Butwin

Fordham Law Review Online

This Essay addresses whether noncitizen parents of school children should be allowed to vote in school board elections. They are currently prohibited from doing so in all but a dozen jurisdictions in only three states. Part I provides background on school boards of education. Part II explores the debate surrounding noncitizen voting in school board elections. It then argues that noncitizen parents’ distinct interest and stake in school board elections support affording them the right to vote in these elections. Moreover, studies show that allowing noncitizen parents to vote would increase the academic achievement of immigrant children, most of whom ...


Separating The Wheat From The Tares: The Supreme Court's Premature Strict Scrutiny Of Race-Based Remedial Measures In Public Education, Hayden Smith 2019 Brigham Young University Law School

Separating The Wheat From The Tares: The Supreme Court's Premature Strict Scrutiny Of Race-Based Remedial Measures In Public Education, Hayden Smith

Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Monetary Liability Of Public School Employees Under The Idea And Section 504/Ada, Perry A. Zirkel 2019 Brigham Young University Law School

Monetary Liability Of Public School Employees Under The Idea And Section 504/Ada, Perry A. Zirkel

Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Armed And Dangerous - Teachers? A Policy Response To Security In Our Public Schools, Todd A. DeMitchell, Christine C. Rath 2019 Brigham Young University Law School

Armed And Dangerous - Teachers? A Policy Response To Security In Our Public Schools, Todd A. Demitchell, Christine C. Rath

Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Federal Role In Universal Pre-K, Brian McWalters 2019 Brigham Young University Law School

The Federal Role In Universal Pre-K, Brian Mcwalters

Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Who Will Educate Me? Using The Americans With Disabilities Act To Improve Educational Access For Incarcerated Juveniles With Disabilities, Lauren A. Koster 2019 Boston College Law School

Who Will Educate Me? Using The Americans With Disabilities Act To Improve Educational Access For Incarcerated Juveniles With Disabilities, Lauren A. Koster

Boston College Law Review

Youth involved with the juvenile justice system present with a higher rate of disability, including mental illness and learning disabilities, than do non-system-involved youth. These young people are often eligible for special education services as provided by the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”). Eligible youth incarcerated in juvenile detention and correctional facilities, however, often fail to receive these services. Education advocates typically bring suits against school districts and correctional institutions alike under the IDEA’s mandate to provide a free appropriate public education to students with disabilities. Unfortunately, this approach is failing because the IDEA is not able ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Tennessee's National Impact On Teacher Evaluation Law & Policy: An Assessment Of Value-Added Model Litigation, Mark A. Paige, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley, Kevin Close 2019 University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth

Tennessee's National Impact On Teacher Evaluation Law & Policy: An Assessment Of Value-Added Model Litigation, Mark A. Paige, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley, Kevin Close

Tennessee Journal of Law and Policy

Over the last decade or so, federal and state education policymakers embraced the use of value added models (VAMs) to evaluate teachers’ performance and make high-stakes employment decisions (e.g., tenure, merit pay, termination of employment). VAMs are complicated statistical models that attempt to estimate a teacher’s contribution to student test scores, particularly those in mathematics and reading. Educational researchers, as well as many teachers and unions, however, have objected to the use of VAMs noting that these models fail to adequately account for variables outside of teachers’ control that contribute to a student’s education performance. Subsequently, many ...


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