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Preface, Peter L. Strauss 2019 Columbia Law School

Preface, Peter L. Strauss

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Use Of Soft Law In The Creation Of Legal Norms In International Commercial Law: How Successful Has It Been?, Henry Deeb Gabriel 2019 Elon University

The Use Of Soft Law In The Creation Of Legal Norms In International Commercial Law: How Successful Has It Been?, Henry Deeb Gabriel

Michigan Journal of International Law

In this Article, I examine several interrelated points. After defining soft law in Part II, I briefly set out some of the assumed advantages soft law instruments may have over legislation and regulations in Part III. In Part IV, I examine why some soft law instruments in international commercial law have been successful in creating international legal norms. In this Part, I specifically examine the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts to show how one might gauge success by looking beyond the express purpose of the instrument. I also compare the UNIDROIT Principles of Commercial Contracts with the American Law ...


Online Terms As In Terrorem Devices, Colin P. Marks 2019 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Online Terms As In Terrorem Devices, Colin P. Marks

Maryland Law Review

Online shopping has quickly replaced the brick-and-mortar experience for a large portion of the consuming public. The online transaction itself is rote: browse items, add them to your cart, and check out. Somewhere along the way, the consumer is likely made aware of (or at least exposed to) the merchant’s terms and conditions, via either a link or a pop-up box. Such terms and conditions have become so ubiquitous that most consumers would be hard-pressed to find a merchant that doesn’t try to impose them somewhere on their website. Though such terms and conditions are pervasive, most consumers ...


Toward A Fairer Model Of Consumer Assent To Standard Form Contracts: In Defense Of Restatement Subsection 211(3), Wayne R. Barnes 2019 Selected Works

Toward A Fairer Model Of Consumer Assent To Standard Form Contracts: In Defense Of Restatement Subsection 211(3), Wayne R. Barnes

Wayne R. Barnes

Standard form contracts permeate our very existence, and now even include contracts we assent to online by way of "clickwrap" and "browsewrap" methods. Notwithstanding the ever-increasing presence and complexity of such standard form contracts, both offline and online, the law of contracts in this area has remained fairly static since before the nineteenth century. The only meaningful salve to the problem of misinformed assent to onerous clauses in standard form contracts thus far has been the unconscionability doctrine, but that doctrine tends to be reserved for the harshest and severest terms. Therefore, a new tool is needed for courts to ...


Toward A Fairer Model Of Consumer Assent To Standard Form Contracts: In Defense Of Restatement Subsection 211(3), Wayne R. Barnes 2019 Selected Works

Toward A Fairer Model Of Consumer Assent To Standard Form Contracts: In Defense Of Restatement Subsection 211(3), Wayne R. Barnes

Wayne R. Barnes

Standard form contracts permeate our very existence, and now even include contracts we assent to online by way of "clickwrap" and "browsewrap" methods. Notwithstanding the ever-increasing presence and complexity of such standard form contracts, both offline and online, the law of contracts in this area has remained fairly static since before the nineteenth century. The only meaningful salve to the problem of misinformed assent to onerous clauses in standard form contracts thus far has been the unconscionability doctrine, but that doctrine tends to be reserved for the harshest and severest terms. Therefore, a new tool is needed for courts to ...


Consumer Assent To Standard Form Contracts And The Voting Analogy, Wayne Barnes 2019 Texas Weslyan University School of Law

Consumer Assent To Standard Form Contracts And The Voting Analogy, Wayne Barnes

Wayne R. Barnes

No abstract provided.


Class Action-Barring Mandatory Pre-Dispute Consumer Arbitration Clauses: An Example Of (And Opportunity For) Dispute System Design?, Nancy A. Welsh 2019 Texas A&M University School of Law

Class Action-Barring Mandatory Pre-Dispute Consumer Arbitration Clauses: An Example Of (And Opportunity For) Dispute System Design?, Nancy A. Welsh

Nancy Welsh

Ultimately, this essay will conclude that a private, ad hoc dispute system design process did lead to the insertion of class action waivers in mandatory pre-dispute consumer arbitration clauses. In-house and outside counsel certainly played key roles in initiating this process, but it is unclear that any individual lawyers could claim credit or responsibility as "designers." The representatives of dispute resolution organizations, meanwhile, played supporting roles-as providers of information and as amici in Supreme Court litigation. The essay will consider whether dispute resolution professionals could have managed their role in the process differently-and if so, why they would have managed ...


Forgotten Cases: Worthen V. Thomas, David F. Forte 2019 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Forgotten Cases: Worthen V. Thomas, David F. Forte

David F. Forte

According to received opinion, the case of the Home Bldg. & Loan Ass’n v. Blaisdell, decided in 1934, laid to rest any force the Contract Clause of the United States Constitution had to limit state legislation that affected existing contracts. But the Supreme Court’s subsequent decisions belies that claim. In fact, a few months later, the Court unanimously decided Worthen v. Thomas, which reaffirmed the vitality of the Contract Clause. Over the next few years, in twenty cases, the Court limited the reach of Blaisdell and confirmed the limiting force of the Contract Clause on state legislation. Only after ...


Contract Governance In Small-World Networks: The Case Of The Maghribi Traders, Lisa Bernstein 2019 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Contract Governance In Small-World Networks: The Case Of The Maghribi Traders, Lisa Bernstein

Northwestern University Law Review

This Article revisits the best known example of successful private ordering in the economics literature: the Maghribi Jewish merchants who engaged in both local and long-distance trade across the Islamic Mediterranean in the eleventh century. Drawing on a case study of over 200 Maghribi merchant letters, it develops a network governance-based account of the way that private ordering might have supported exchange among the Maghribi traders with little or no reliance on the public legal system. The analysis reveals that a particular type of bridge-and-cluster configuration of ties among traders and trading centers--known as a “small-world network”—can have strong ...


Moral Diversity And Efficient Breach, Matthew A. Seligman 2019 Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

Moral Diversity And Efficient Breach, Matthew A. Seligman

Michigan Law Review

Most people think it is morally wrong to breach a contract. But sophisticated commercial parties, like large corporations, have no objection to breaching contracts and paying the price in damages when doing so is in their self-interest. The literature has ignored the profound legal, economic, and normative implications of that asymmetry between individuals’ and firms’ approaches to breach. To individuals, a contract is a promise that cannot be broken regardless of the financial stakes. For example, millions of homeowners refused to breach their mortgage contracts in the aftermath of the housing crisis even though doing so could have saved them ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Interpreting Organizational "Contracts" And The Private Ordering Of Public Company Governance, Megan Wischmeier Shaner 2019 College of William & Mary Law School

Interpreting Organizational "Contracts" And The Private Ordering Of Public Company Governance, Megan Wischmeier Shaner

William & Mary Law Review

Corporate law is undergoing an explosion of governance by private ordering. With increasing frequency and creativity, the charter and bylaws of public corporations are being used as tools for restructuring key aspects of corporate governance. The current focus of parties, courts, and scholars has been on the facial validity of these efforts. In light of courts’ willingness to uphold corporate governance contracting, legal battles will morph from validity challenges to interpretation disputes. Yet interpretation principles are a topic to which corporate scholars have devoted limited attention. With interpretation poised to take on an influential role in shaping corporate law and ...


Survival Of The Trademark License: In Re Tempnology And Contract Rejection In Bankruptcy, Avery Minor 2019 Boston College Law School

Survival Of The Trademark License: In Re Tempnology And Contract Rejection In Bankruptcy, Avery Minor

Boston College Law Review

On January 12, 2018, the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held, in In re Tempnology, that forcing specific performance of a trademark license after a contract rejection in a bankruptcy case would be contrary to the plain-language of Section 365(n) of the Bankruptcy Code and conflict with the goal of providing debtors with a “fresh start.” In so doing, the First Circuit joined the Fourth Circuit in a split with the Seventh Circuit, which has characterized a contract rejection as a breach in the context of non-bankruptcy law, therefore not extinguishing any trademark license rights ...


The "Art" Of Future Life: Rethinking Personal Injury Law For The Negligent Deprivation Of A Patient's Right To Procreation In The Age Of Assisted Reproductive Technologies, Erika N. Auger 2019 Chicago-Kent College of Law

The "Art" Of Future Life: Rethinking Personal Injury Law For The Negligent Deprivation Of A Patient's Right To Procreation In The Age Of Assisted Reproductive Technologies, Erika N. Auger

Chicago-Kent Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Metastasization Of Mandatory Arbitration, Alexander J.S. Colvin 2019 Cornell University

The Metastasization Of Mandatory Arbitration, Alexander J.S. Colvin

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Mandatory arbitration procedures have expanded to become a common feature of American employment relations. This article presents the results of a new original survey examining the extent of mandatory arbitration, where it is most commonly used, and which employees it is most likely to affect. Overall, 53.9 percent of private sector business establishments, representing 56.2 percent of nonunion employees, have mandatory arbitration procedures. Larger employers are more likely to have adopted mandatory arbitration, as are workplaces with lower paid employees. Mandatory arbitration is particularly common in California, North Carolina, and Texas, but is widespread nationwide. Class action waivers ...


A Humble Tribute To Professor Deborah Waire Post Upon Her Retirement, Deborah Zalesne 2019 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

A Humble Tribute To Professor Deborah Waire Post Upon Her Retirement, Deborah Zalesne

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


Hushing Contracts, David A. Hoffman, Eric Lampmann 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Hushing Contracts, David A. Hoffman, Eric Lampmann

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The last few years have brought a renewed appreciation of the costs of nondisclosure agreements that suppress information about sexual wrongdoing. Recently passed bills in a number of states, including New York and California, has attempted to deal with such hush contracts. But such legislation is often incomplete, and many courts and commentators continue to ask if victims of harassment can sign enforceable settlements that conceal serious, potentially metastasizing, social harms. In this Article, we argue that employing the public policy doctrine, courts ought to generally refuse to enforce hush agreements, especially those created by organizations. We restate public policy ...


The Duty Dilemma: When The Duty To Mitigate Damages And The Duty To Preserve Evidence Collide, Collen L. Steffen 2019 University of Oklahoma College of Law

The Duty Dilemma: When The Duty To Mitigate Damages And The Duty To Preserve Evidence Collide, Collen L. Steffen

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


From The Courtroom To The Classroom: How A Litigator Became A Transactional Drafting Professor, Amy Bauer 2019 University of Colorado Law School

From The Courtroom To The Classroom: How A Litigator Became A Transactional Drafting Professor, Amy Bauer

Articles

No abstract provided.


Not From Guile But From Entitlement: Lawful Opportunism Capitalizes On The Cracks In Contracts, Gastón de los Reyes Jr., Kirsten Martin 2019 The George Washington University School of Business

Not From Guile But From Entitlement: Lawful Opportunism Capitalizes On The Cracks In Contracts, Gastón De Los Reyes Jr., Kirsten Martin

Buffalo Law Review

Few concepts have been more pivotal to contract law scholarship over the last forty years than the opportunism attributed ex ante and ex post to contracting parties, yet the lawful form of opportunism identified by Nobel Laureate Oliver Williamson in 1991 remains surprisingly overlooked in favor of the blatant forms of opportunism that result from “self-interest seeking with guile.” This Article extends Williamson’s inchoate account of lawful opportunism and reports the first empirical study of the phenomenon.

The conceptual analysis of lawful opportunism is developed with reference to the bargaining underlying the classic impossibility decision, Taylor v. Caldwell. Three ...


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