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The Ballad Of Harry James Tompkins, Brian L. Frye 2019 The University of Akron

The Ballad Of Harry James Tompkins, Brian L. Frye

Akron Law Review

On July 27, 1934, Harry James Tompkins lost his arm, supposedly when an unsecured refrigerator car door on a train operated by the Erie Railroad Company hit him in the head. Tompkins won a $30,000 judgment in federal court, but in Erie v. Tompkins (1938), the United States Supreme Court famously reversed, holding that federal courts sitting in diversity must apply state substantive law, not federal "general common law." While many scholars have studied Erie v. Tompkins, few have studied the facts of the case, and none have questioned Tompkins's account. This article argues that Tompkins and his ...


Remedies, Equity & Erie, Caprice L. Roberts 2019 The University of Akron

Remedies, Equity & Erie, Caprice L. Roberts

Akron Law Review

This article addresses how a federal court sitting in diversity jurisdiction should approach remedies issues, particularly where the law-equity divide lingers. Treatment of remedies raises tricky problems for federal judges regarding what law to apply. It matters because of separation-of-powers, federalism, jury trial implications, forum shopping, and fairness to litigants. Because, after all, the choice of federal versus state forum should not dictate the outcome. Further, notwithstanding calls to eliminate vestiges of equity’s unique characteristics and requirements, the gravitational pull of equity remains. There is value in continuing to honor equitable principles. And there is value in federal judges ...


Beyond The Elements: Erie And The Standards For Preliminary And Permanent Injuctions, Michael T. Morley 2019 The University of Akron

Beyond The Elements: Erie And The Standards For Preliminary And Permanent Injuctions, Michael T. Morley

Akron Law Review

Federal courts frequently avoid deciding whether federal or state law governs the availability of injunctive relief for state-law claims by simply declaring that both sets of standards are the same. Although federal and state standards for injunctions often incorporate similar elements, those elements often are phrased in somewhat different terms and relate to each other in different ways. Even when federal and state standards involve facially identical elements, federal and state courts often interpret and apply them differently based on completely distinct bodies of precedent that can lead to different outcomes. Because state and federal standards arise from, and refer ...


The Erie/Sears/Compco Sqeeze: Erie's Effects On Unfair Competition And Trade Secret Law, Sharon K. Sandeen 2019 The University of Akron

The Erie/Sears/Compco Sqeeze: Erie's Effects On Unfair Competition And Trade Secret Law, Sharon K. Sandeen

Akron Law Review

On the occasion of the 80th anniversary of the Supreme Court's famous decision in Erie Railroad v. Tompkins, this article explores the consequences of that decision on the development of unfair competition law in the United States. It details efforts by lawyers and legislators to grapple with those consequences and provides an overview of the evolution of unfair competition law in the U.S. since Erie, with a particular focus on trade secret law.


Jurisdiction Stripping Of The Federal Circuit?, Shubha Ghosh 2019 The University of Akron

Jurisdiction Stripping Of The Federal Circuit?, Shubha Ghosh

Akron Law Review

This article examines how the Federal Circuit addresses state commercial and contract law in its patent law jurisprudence. Instead of deferring to state law, the court creates its own federal common law of contracts and assignments, creating parallels with the debates arising from the 1938 Erie decision. This federal common law is inconsistent with the need for uniformity in the law governing patent transactions. To resolve this issue, Congress may consider stripping Federal Circuit jurisdiction over state contract law claims. This article examines the pros and cons of this proposal.


Brandeis's Ip Federalism: Thoughts On Erie At Eighty, Joseph Scott Miller 2019 The University of Akron

Brandeis's Ip Federalism: Thoughts On Erie At Eighty, Joseph Scott Miller

Akron Law Review

Justice Brandeis is, in intellectual property law’s precincts, most famous for his lone dissent in International News Service v. Associate Press, the misappropriation case one can find in virtually every I.P. survey casebook (and many property law casebooks as well). But in the wider legal world, Brandeis is likely most famous for his earthquake opinion in Erie Railroad Co. v. Tompkins. Do Brandeis’s opinions in these two cases speak to each other? Can considering them together inform broader reflections on the texture of our federalism in the I.P. context? This piece, prepared in connection with the ...


At The Intersection Of Erie And Administrative Law: Front-Loading The Erie Question Into The Adoption Of A Federal Rule, Jeffrey L. Rensberger 2019 The University of Akron

At The Intersection Of Erie And Administrative Law: Front-Loading The Erie Question Into The Adoption Of A Federal Rule, Jeffrey L. Rensberger

Akron Law Review

The Supreme Court regularly faces Erie issues involving the displacement of state law by a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure. Under Hanna v. Plummer, federal rules displace state law if they were intended to apply to the matter at issue and are valid. But in such cases, the Court has already encountered the rule once before, at the time it adopted the rule and transmitted it to Congress. Why is the Erie question decided at the back end of the process rather than at its front? If the question of whether a rule is intended to displace state law were ...


Adrift On Erie: Characterizing Forum-Selection Clauses, Kermit Roosevelt III, Bethan R. Jones 2019 The University of Akron

Adrift On Erie: Characterizing Forum-Selection Clauses, Kermit Roosevelt Iii, Bethan R. Jones

Akron Law Review

Erie is one of our most famous cases, but also one of the most mysterious. It has become something of a Rorschach test, a pattern onto which scholars project their own concerns. This article presents a simple view of Erie as a case about power: first, who has the power to make certain laws and second, who has the power to interpret them. From this perspective, Erie has nothing to do with substance-procedure characterization—the topic now understood to be governed by Erie analysis. Indeed, early post-Erie cases describe Erie as concerned with power. The substance-procedure distinction enters the ...


Erie And Constitutional Structure: An Intellectual History, Craig Green 2019 The University of Akron

Erie And Constitutional Structure: An Intellectual History, Craig Green

Akron Law Review

Erie's meaning has changed many times during its eighty-year history, and this essay provides a brief intellectual history about those serial transformations. Most modern lawyers have completely forgotten the radicalism of Erie's constitutional reasoning in 1938. The legal process school defanged Erie's original meaning, even as scholars simultaneously redefined the term "constitutional" itself. Erie's cultural significance dropped as the legal process school faded. But it has resurfaced among twenty-first-century conservatives as a pillar of federalism (the "old myth") as well as separation of powers (the "new myth"). Especially given Erie's profound reputation as an iconic ...


The Erie Doctrine: A Flowchart, Michael S. Green 2019 The University of Akron

The Erie Doctrine: A Flowchart, Michael S. Green

Akron Law Review

The following is a complete flowchart for Erie problems. Although it differs from past efforts in many respects, perhaps the most important difference is that it accommodates all the jurisdictional contexts in which Erie problems can arise in federal court, not just diversity jurisdiction. My hope is that this flowchart will help demystify Erie, by showing that Erie problems are, by and large, standard choice-of-law problems, much like those faced by state courts.


Erie As A Way Of Life, Ernest A. Young 2019 The University of Akron

Erie As A Way Of Life, Ernest A. Young

Akron Law Review

This essay—presented as the keynote address to the University of Akron School of Law’s conference on “Erie at 80”—considers the impact of the Supreme Court’s decision in Erie Railroad Co. v. Tompkins on the broader landscape of American law. I begin with Erie’s contribution to our modern, positivist understanding of the nature of law. That understanding, however, is under threat from pervasive tendencies, on both the political Left and Right, to collapse the distinction between law as a set of positivist choices adopted by government and law as the principles that we think are just ...


If The Shoe Fits: Rethinking Minimum Contacts And The Fsia Commercial Activity Exception, Jacqueline M. Fitch 2019 Washington and Lee University School of Law

If The Shoe Fits: Rethinking Minimum Contacts And The Fsia Commercial Activity Exception, Jacqueline M. Fitch

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

The question explored in this Note is whether, under the direct effect clause of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act commercial activities exception, a foreign sovereign must have minimum contacts with the United States in order for a U.S. court to assert personal jurisdiction over the entity. Examining personal jurisdiction over foreign states under the direct effect clause requires exploring the interaction between constitutional law and principles of international law. The minimum contacts analysis highlights the tension between applying constitutional due process protection to a foreign state, while simultaneously asserting jurisdiction over its commercial activities. Denying jurisdiction over a foreign ...


A Rhetorical Analysis Of Opening Statements In Trial: Reconsidering The Classical Canon Of Invention, Andrew Chandler 2019 Bellarmine University

A Rhetorical Analysis Of Opening Statements In Trial: Reconsidering The Classical Canon Of Invention, Andrew Chandler

Undergraduate Theses

This analysis of 21 opening statements probes at current persuasive practices employed by trial attorneys through the lens of mainstream legal advice and an expanded definition of rhetorical invention – one which includes both discovery and creation. An evaluation of such practice reveals the utility, and furthermore the duty of the advocate, to draw upon an expanded realm of available arguments.


Are Interlocutory Qualified Immunity Appeals Lawful?, Michael E. Solimine 2019 University of Cincinnati College of Law

Are Interlocutory Qualified Immunity Appeals Lawful?, Michael E. Solimine

Notre Dame Law Review Online

For half a century the Supreme Court has held that defendants in civil rights actions can avoid monetary liability if they demonstrate a qualified immunity for their actions. And for thirty years, the Court has held that district court denials of the qualified immunity defense are immediately appealable under the collateral order exception to the final order requirement. Controversial from the start, the qualified immunity defense has recently come under renewed stress, with calls from individual Justices and by leading voices in academia to either significantly modify or even abolish the defense. While primarily dealing with substantive aspects of the ...


The Ninth Circuit Enters The Class Certification Fray: Sali'S Rejection Of Evidentiary Formalism And Its Implications, Jessica Bachetti 2019 Boston College Law School

The Ninth Circuit Enters The Class Certification Fray: Sali'S Rejection Of Evidentiary Formalism And Its Implications, Jessica Bachetti

Boston College Law Review

In 2015, registered nurses brought a putative employment class action against the hospital that employed them, alleging that the hospital underpaid them by rounding their time in violation of California law. The United States District Court for the Central District of California denied class certification because the evidence that the plaintiffs submitted to demonstrate the “typicality requirement” for class certification under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23 was inadmissible. On appeal, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that inadmissibility alone is not a proper basis for denying class certification, adding to the circuit split over ...


The Haves Of Procedure, Ion Meyn 2019 College of William & Mary Law School

The Haves Of Procedure, Ion Meyn

William & Mary Law Review

In litigation, “haves” and “have-nots” battle over what procedures should govern. Yet, much greater hostilities have been avoided—a war between the “haves” themselves. “Criminal haves” (prosecutors) and “civil haves” (institutional players) litigate in separate territories and under different sets of rules. This is good, for them, because they have incompatible objectives. This Article contends that protecting the “haves” from each other has profoundly influenced the development of procedure in the United States.

The “haves” reap significant benefits in being insulated from each other as they seek rules responsive to their unique preferences. A “criminal have” seeks easy access to ...


Save Our Sound Obx, Inc. V. North Carolina Department Of Transportation, Mitch L. WerBell V 2019 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Save Our Sound Obx, Inc. V. North Carolina Department Of Transportation, Mitch L. Werbell V

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled in favor of several governmental agencies seeking to construct a new bridge in the Pamlico Sound adjacent to North Carolina’s Outer Banks. For years, state and federal agencies have put forth a massive coordinated effort to address the constant weather damage and erosion which occurs to a section of North Carolina Highway 12. The court found the agencies properly cleared NEPA’s environmental review requirements for the bridge’s construction. Additionally, the opponent-litigants’ efforts to add claims challenging the project, based on new information about a shipwreck in the bridge’s ...


Apparently, There Are Places Like Home: A Path To Propriety For Consent-By-Registration Jurisdiction In The Third Circuit, Brett E. Broczowski 2019 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

Apparently, There Are Places Like Home: A Path To Propriety For Consent-By-Registration Jurisdiction In The Third Circuit, Brett E. Broczowski

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Class Action-Barring Mandatory Pre-Dispute Consumer Arbitration Clauses: An Example Of (And Opportunity For) Dispute System Design?, Nancy A. Welsh 2019 Texas A&M University School of Law

Class Action-Barring Mandatory Pre-Dispute Consumer Arbitration Clauses: An Example Of (And Opportunity For) Dispute System Design?, Nancy A. Welsh

Nancy Welsh

Ultimately, this essay will conclude that a private, ad hoc dispute system design process did lead to the insertion of class action waivers in mandatory pre-dispute consumer arbitration clauses. In-house and outside counsel certainly played key roles in initiating this process, but it is unclear that any individual lawyers could claim credit or responsibility as "designers." The representatives of dispute resolution organizations, meanwhile, played supporting roles-as providers of information and as amici in Supreme Court litigation. The essay will consider whether dispute resolution professionals could have managed their role in the process differently-and if so, why they would have managed ...


Felon Jurors In Vacationland, James M. Binnall 2019 University of Maine School of Law

Felon Jurors In Vacationland, James M. Binnall

Maine Law Review

Maine is the only jurisdiction in the United States that places no limitations on a convicted felon’s juror eligibility. Instead, Maine screens prospective felon-jurors using their normal jury selection procedures. In recent years, scholars have suggested that meaningful community engagement can help facilitate former offenders’ reintegration and criminal desistance. From that theoretical posture, a number of empirical studies have explored the connection between participation in the electorate and the reentry of former offenders. Those studies suggest that voting has the potential to prompt pro-social changes among former offenders. Still, to date, no research has focused on jury service as ...


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