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Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies and Planning

The Formalities Of Informal Urbanism: Technical And Scholarly Knowledge At Work In Do-It‐Yourself Urban Design, Gordon Douglas Aug 2013

The Formalities Of Informal Urbanism: Technical And Scholarly Knowledge At Work In Do-It‐Yourself Urban Design, Gordon Douglas

Faculty Publications, Urban and Regional Planning

Among the numerous ways people make illegal or unauthorized alterations to urban space, of particular interest in recent years have been the creative, local, and often anonymous efforts at informal but functional “improvement” to the built environment where the state or property owners have failed to act – practices I call “do-it-yourself urban design.” Authorities, planners, and community members alike rightfully wonder about the meanings of these actions, and the questions they raise about rights, responsibilities, benefits, and consequences. Building from alarger qualitative study on DIY urban design across eleven cities, this paper focuses on the motivations, methods, and self-perceptions of ...


Global Cities Are Coastal Cities Too: Paradox In Sustainability?, Herman L. Boschken Jul 2013

Global Cities Are Coastal Cities Too: Paradox In Sustainability?, Herman L. Boschken

Herman L. Boschken

Worldwide, most global cities are located in coastal zones, but a paradox of sustainability is especially striking for American global cities. This article examines such paradox drawn between globalization-induced development and coastal ecosystems. It focuses on two developmental components found principally in global cities: (1) the agglomeration of foreign waterborne commerce and global business services and (2) the accelerated activity and mobility habits of a global professional class. Despite formidable gaps in research, some anecdotal evidence suggests unique hazards exist for the coastal ecology as globalization pressures expand a global city’s urban footprint.


There’S No Place Like Home? Telecommuting As A Viable Commuting Alternative For San Jose Government And Companies To Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled And Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Jennifer Marie Piozet Apr 2013

There’S No Place Like Home? Telecommuting As A Viable Commuting Alternative For San Jose Government And Companies To Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled And Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Jennifer Marie Piozet

Master's Projects

No abstract provided.


Facebook Headquarters: Thumbs Up Or Thumbs Down For Housing Prices In East Palo Alto?, Veronica A. Flores Apr 2013

Facebook Headquarters: Thumbs Up Or Thumbs Down For Housing Prices In East Palo Alto?, Veronica A. Flores

Master's Projects

No abstract provided.


Brownfield Cleanup In A Post-Redevelopment Era: Using A Collaborative, Community-Based Approach To Green The Spartan-Keyes Neighborhood, Sara Lynn Sichley Apr 2013

Brownfield Cleanup In A Post-Redevelopment Era: Using A Collaborative, Community-Based Approach To Green The Spartan-Keyes Neighborhood, Sara Lynn Sichley

Master's Projects

No abstract provided.


Built For Dementia: Urban Design Analysis For Dementia-Friendly Communities, Jason Su Apr 2013

Built For Dementia: Urban Design Analysis For Dementia-Friendly Communities, Jason Su

Master's Projects

No abstract provided.


Historic Waterfront Restoration, Sustainability, And Urban Form: A "Greener" Master Plan For Pier 70 At The San Francisco Waterfront, Sonia Melani Miller Apr 2013

Historic Waterfront Restoration, Sustainability, And Urban Form: A "Greener" Master Plan For Pier 70 At The San Francisco Waterfront, Sonia Melani Miller

Master's Projects

This study explores the use of green areas as a method for integrating urban space and its applicability to waterfront reclamation, a specialized discipline focusing on the rehabilitation of industrial areas of ports. It also explores the philosophy of resource conservation and the integrative design solutions increasingly employed worldwide in projects of waterfront reclamation.


Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp Jan 2013

Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp

Faculty Publications, Anthropology

In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1vG542A, which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1vG542A was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1vG542A is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene ...


The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard Jan 2013

The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard

Faculty Publications, Anthropology

This study explores the interrelationship between the genus Canis and hunter–gatherers through a case study of prehistoric Native Americans in the San Francisco Bay-Sacramento Delta area. A distinctive aspect of the region's prehistoric record is the interment of canids, variously classified as coyotes, dogs, and wolves. Since these species are difficult to distinguish based solely on morphology, ancient DNA analysis was employed to distinguish species. The DNA study results, the first on canids from archaeological sites in California, are entirely represented by domesticated dogs (including both interments and disarticulated samples from midden deposits). These results, buttressed by stable ...


Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp Jan 2013

Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp

Faculty Publications, Urban and Regional Planning

In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1vG542A, which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1vG542A was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1vG542A is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene ...


The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard Jan 2013

The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard

Alan M. Leventhal

This study explores the interrelationship between the genus Canis and hunter–gatherers through a case study of prehistoric Native Americans in the San Francisco Bay-Sacramento Delta area. A distinctive aspect of the region's prehistoric record is the interment of canids, variously classified as coyotes, dogs, and wolves. Since these species are difficult to distinguish based solely on morphology, ancient DNA analysis was employed to distinguish species. The DNA study results, the first on canids from archaeological sites in California, are entirely represented by domesticated dogs (including both interments and disarticulated samples from midden deposits). These results, buttressed by stable ...


Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp Jan 2013

Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp

Alan M. Leventhal

In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1vG542A, which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1vG542A was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1vG542A is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene ...