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Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies and Planning

Identifying And Classifying, Quantifying And Visualizing Green Infrastructure Via Urban Transects In Rome, Italy And Sydney, Australia, Simon J. Kilbane, Daniele La Rosa Jan 2019

Identifying And Classifying, Quantifying And Visualizing Green Infrastructure Via Urban Transects In Rome, Italy And Sydney, Australia, Simon J. Kilbane, Daniele La Rosa

Proceedings of the Fábos Conference on Landscape and Greenway Planning

Green Infrastructure is increasingly recognised as an approach to deliver a wide-ranging set of ecosystem services in cities and to operationalize concepts of urban resilience through the better delivery of urban planning, water sensitive urban design and a broad diversity of open space types. This paper argues that the first step in the delivery of effective Green Infrastructure planning and hence ecosystem services is the identification, visualisation and calculus of the full spectrum of existing open space types within urban contexts. To test this idea two case study cities – Rome and Sydney – were selected for their differing geographical origins and ...


Greenways As Indigenous Cultural Pathways: Healing Landscape And Peoples One Step At A Time In The South West Of Western Australia, Simon J. Kilbane Jan 2019

Greenways As Indigenous Cultural Pathways: Healing Landscape And Peoples One Step At A Time In The South West Of Western Australia, Simon J. Kilbane

Proceedings of the Fábos Conference on Landscape and Greenway Planning

The South West of Western Australia (SWWA) is widely known as one of the world’s most biodiverse regions and a recognised biodiversity hotspot. However, since European colonisation approximately 200 years ago, this landscape has been cleared, fragmented and degraded at large and small scales, a problem magnified by being one of the planet’s most vulnerable locations to climate change. This region also hosts one of the world’s longest continuous cultures, the Nyungar people, who have lived in the SWWA for at least 38,000 years. However following colonisation Nyungar land management practices – that once connected the region ...