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Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies

Vacating The City: An Analysis Of New Homes Vs. Household Growth, Thomas Bier, Charles Post Jan 2003

Vacating The City: An Analysis Of New Homes Vs. Household Growth, Thomas Bier, Charles Post

Urban Publications

The high price of housing on the coasts, population growth in the large metropolitan areas of the south, southwest, and west, and the issue of affordability for low- and moderate-income households across the country fueled the view that housing production was insufficient and that the shortfall was contributing to rising prices and limited housing choice. Indeed, underlying all of the housing-related changes and issues of the 1990s were the factors of supply and demand. The nation grew by 13.5 million households while 13.2 million building permits were filed. Nationally, housing supply was just about in balance with population ...


Housing Analysis For Cleveland Lakefront Development, Thomas Bier, Charles Post, Rick Seifritz Jan 2003

Housing Analysis For Cleveland Lakefront Development, Thomas Bier, Charles Post, Rick Seifritz

Urban Publications

The Center for Housing Research & Policy conducted this survey and analysis of housing on Cleveland’s lakefront for the Cleveland Lakefront Partners, which is composed of the city of Cleveland, Cleveland Tomorrow, the Greater Cleveland Growth Association, and the Cleveland Neighborhood Development Corporation. The report includes both the results of the survey of residents in the multi-county Cleveland region and a comparative study of waterfront populations in the cities of Milwaukee, Chicago, Portland, and Baltimore. The survey results showed that at least 6,000 and possibly up to 9,000 middle and upper-income households would be interested in living on the lakefront if housing were available. Planners have determined that altering the location and configuration of the city’s Shoreway would make available land that could accommodate 10,000 units of new housing. If five percent (10,000) of Cleveland’s households lived on its lakefront, that percentage would be well within the range of the waterfront populations of comparable cities (Portland, 9.7 percent; Chicago, 7.1 percent; Baltimore, four percent; and Milwaukee, 1.8 percent). The report’s results have played a significant role in the city of Cleveland’s plans for lakefront redevelopment.


The Cleveland Charrette On Sustainable Urban Environments: Elevating The Stature Of Urban Redevelopment, Thomas Bier, Ziona Austrian Jan 2000

The Cleveland Charrette On Sustainable Urban Environments: Elevating The Stature Of Urban Redevelopment, Thomas Bier, Ziona Austrian

Urban Publications

The main focus of this charrette -- the stature of urban redevelopment relative to suburban "greenfield" development -- was epitomized by two Cleveland-area newspaper items (see Appendix A). One item announced an $850,000 federal grant to a suburb located at the rural fringe of the Cleveland metropolitan area. The grant from the Economic Development Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce was for construction of a road that would open 250 acres of virgin land for industrial development.


Sellers Of Cleveland Homes, 1988-1996 1998, Thomas Bier, Charles Post, Winifred J. Weizer Jan 1998

Sellers Of Cleveland Homes, 1988-1996 1998, Thomas Bier, Charles Post, Winifred J. Weizer

Urban Publications

No abstract provided.


Public Policy And "Rural Sprawl": Lessons From Northeast Ohio, Patricia Burgess, Thomas Bier Jan 1997

Public Policy And "Rural Sprawl": Lessons From Northeast Ohio, Patricia Burgess, Thomas Bier

Urban Publications

No abstract provided.