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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Examining The Political Motivations Of Christian Women Following The 2016 Presidential Election, Julie Grace Jul 2018

Examining The Political Motivations Of Christian Women Following The 2016 Presidential Election, Julie Grace

Master's Theses (2009 -)

As research begins and continues to examine the historic nature of the 2016 presidential election, this study aims to understand the political motivations of a specific group of voters – Christian women in two Wisconsin counties that flipped from voting for a Democrat in 2012 to a Republican in 2016. Long-form, qualitative interviews were used to obtain an understanding of the participants’ faith, their view on politics, and their thoughts on the 2016 election and President Trump’s first year in office. Grounded theory was used as a theoretical framework for this study, and the constant comparative method of analysis was ...


Engaging Democracy: The Trouble With Trump, Jeff Vanderwerff Feb 2018

Engaging Democracy: The Trouble With Trump, Jeff Vanderwerff

Northwestern Review

In its original version, this brief essay was delivered as a talk on the Northwestern College campus. The author reflects on Christian evangelical engagement in politics in “The Age of Trump”—as a believer, a political scientist, and a former candidate for state legislative office. Love, he argues—God’s love for us, and our love for God—is the key. As God’s love for each and all was made manifest in Christ on the cross, evangelicals should not lose sight of such love in engaging in public debate and policy-making. Insofar as uncritical evangelical support for Trump is ...


The Sunday After The Tuesday: The 2016 Presidential Election In The Pulpit, Matthew Boedy Jan 2018

The Sunday After The Tuesday: The 2016 Presidential Election In The Pulpit, Matthew Boedy

Sermon Studies

The 2016 presidential election divided Christians along racial, economic, and theological lines. The central question of my study was how did ministers frame the election, if at all? Through analysis of transcripts of 47 sermons from across the country (14 states plus Washington D.C.), from multiple denominations and various sized congregations given on November 13 or thereabouts, I claim that the paradox of the dual citizenship of Christians was the predominant theme in these sermons. Second, only one minister directly endorsed a candidate and only a handful indirectly endorsed. Many preached a form of unity.