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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Rethinking Symbolic Racism: Evidence Of Attribution Bias, Brad T. Gomez, J. Matthew Wilson Aug 2006

Rethinking Symbolic Racism: Evidence Of Attribution Bias, Brad T. Gomez, J. Matthew Wilson

Political Science Research

This paper demonstrates that cognitive tendencies related to political sophistication produce an attribution bias in the widely accepted symbolic racism scale. When this bias is controlled statistically, the effect of symbolic racism on racial policy attitudes is greatly diminished. Our theory posits that high sophisticates tend to make global/distal attributions, allowing them to associate racial inequality with broader sociopolitical causes. Less sophisticated individuals, conversely, tend to make local/proximal attributions, thus biasing them against ascribing responsibility systemically. Consequently, less sophisticated individuals tend to be classified as intolerant by the symbolic racism scale, even when controlling for factors such as ...


The Spouse In The House: What Explains The Marriage Gap In Canada?, J. Matthew Wilson, Michael Lusztig Dec 2004

The Spouse In The House: What Explains The Marriage Gap In Canada?, J. Matthew Wilson, Michael Lusztig

Political Science Research

A literature has emerged in American voting studies noting a “marriage gap”—the propensity for married voters to support the Republican party. Using Canadian Election Study data, we establish the existence of a significant marriage gap in Canada. We also seek to determine if the marriage gap is driven by socio-demographic factors or attitudinal ones. We find that while socio-demographic factors contribute to the marriage gap, they explain relatively little variance. In probing the attitudinal basis of the marriage gap further, we find that married Canadians differ from the unwed very strongly on issues of moral traditionalism, but much less ...


Follow The Leader? Presidential Approval, Presidential Support, And Representatives' Electoral Fortunes, Paul Gronke, Jeffrey Koch, J. Matthew Wilson Aug 2003

Follow The Leader? Presidential Approval, Presidential Support, And Representatives' Electoral Fortunes, Paul Gronke, Jeffrey Koch, J. Matthew Wilson

Political Science Research

While the link between presidential approval and congressional election outcomes is long established, scholars have generally ignored the role of a member’s own voting record in mediating these effects. If voters truly use the congressional ballot to express support or opposition toward the President, then they should not reward or punish all of his fellow partisans equally. Instead, the degree of reward or punishment meted out by voters ought to depend on the member’s level of support for the president’s legislative initiatives. Using data from the 1993, 1994, and 1996 National Election Studies, we demonstrate two key ...