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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Can Joe The Plumber Support Redistribution - Law, Social Preferences, And Sustainable Policy Design, Gillian Lester Jan 2010

Can Joe The Plumber Support Redistribution - Law, Social Preferences, And Sustainable Policy Design, Gillian Lester

Faculty Scholarship

This article explores how to build political support for law reform designed to achieve economic redistribution. Specifically, I analyze and compare reforms that aim to redistribute by targeting benefits at low-income individuals through an income or means test, versus those that emphasize "universal" allocation of benefits, not conditioned on poverty. I argue that notwithstanding that we should expect universal provision (by definition) to achieve less redistribution than means testing, universalist policies ultimately may be more effective in achieving this goal because they are likely to be more politically durable, and-more intriguingly-to create social conditions that increase toleration for redistribution. I ...


The Culture Of Citizenship, Leti Volpp Jan 2007

The Culture Of Citizenship, Leti Volpp

Faculty Scholarship

The headscarf debate in France exemplifies what is widely perceived as the battle between a culture-free citizenship and a culturally-laden other. This battle, however, presumes the existence of a neutral state that must either tolerate or ban particular cultural differences. In this Article, I challenge that presumption by demonstrating how both cultural difference and citizenship are imagined and produced. The citizen is assumed to be modern and motivated by reason; the cultural other is assumed to be traditional and motivated by culture. Yet citizenship is both a cultural and anti-cultural institution: citizenship positions itself as oppositional to culture, even as ...


Is Suspension A Political Question, Amanda L. Tyler Jan 2006

Is Suspension A Political Question, Amanda L. Tyler

Faculty Scholarship

The article focuses on the Suspension Clause of the U.S. Constitution being a political issue. It says that once suspension is viewed as a nonjusticiable political question, it would turn as a subject on which most of the restraints imposed by the Constitution would not be subjected to judicial enforcement. It is claimed that such thought should be denied because it is at odds of writ of habeas corpus heritage and would only complicate the separation of powers and the institution of judicial reviews.


The Supreme Court Forecasting Project: Legal And Political Science Approaches To Predicting Supreme Court Decisionmaking, Theodore W. Ruger, Pauline T. Kim, Andrew D. Martin, Kevin M. Quinn Jan 2004

The Supreme Court Forecasting Project: Legal And Political Science Approaches To Predicting Supreme Court Decisionmaking, Theodore W. Ruger, Pauline T. Kim, Andrew D. Martin, Kevin M. Quinn

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Who Gets On Top In Democracy - Elections As Filters, Robert Cooter Jan 2003

Who Gets On Top In Democracy - Elections As Filters, Robert Cooter

Faculty Scholarship

Economic models of politics usually assume that all politicians maximize their narrow self-interest, so the constitution and other laws should be designed to constrain the worst people. In contrast, I assume that different politicians have different traits of character, so the constitution and other laws should be designed to promote the best and demote the worst. Successful filtering of politicians partly determines whether a country enjoys good or bad government. In my model, each election serves as a filter, so, up to a point, more elections filter better. Countries that suffer bad government do so partly because politicians face too ...


Brown To Black: The Politics Of Judicial Appointments For Latinos, Maria Echaveste Jan 2002

Brown To Black: The Politics Of Judicial Appointments For Latinos, Maria Echaveste

Faculty Scholarship

Discusses observations in judicial appointment for Hispanics. Existence of barriers to Latino judicial appointments; Absence of unity among Hispanic functions to forestall the nomination of qualified Latinos; Lack of qualifications due to the raw political nature of judicial appointments; Illustration of the situation through actual events; Revelation of lessons from foregoing reflections.


The Wages Of Ambivalence: On The Context And Prospects Of New York's Death Penalty, Franklin E. Zimring Jan 1996

The Wages Of Ambivalence: On The Context And Prospects Of New York's Death Penalty, Franklin E. Zimring

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Democracy And Disgust: Reflections On Public Choice, Daniel A. Farber Jan 1989

Democracy And Disgust: Reflections On Public Choice, Daniel A. Farber

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


State Regulation And The Dormant Commerce Clause, Daniel A. Farber Jan 1986

State Regulation And The Dormant Commerce Clause, Daniel A. Farber

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Unity In Tort, Contract, And Property: The Model Of Precaution, Robert Cooter Jan 1985

Unity In Tort, Contract, And Property: The Model Of Precaution, Robert Cooter

Faculty Scholarship

Explores how common law combine the goal of compensation with the goal of minimizing social costs. Goals for adopting allocative cost rules; Description of a simple model as applied to torts, contracts and property; Three common-law mechanisms for compensating victims.


Federalism And Legal Process: Historical And Contemporary Analysis Of The American System, Harry N. Scheiber Jan 1979

Federalism And Legal Process: Historical And Contemporary Analysis Of The American System, Harry N. Scheiber

Faculty Scholarship

Whether federalism is more than a legal fiction is a question that generates considerable controversy among scholars in law and the social sciences. Historians of 19th-century American federalism have differed about the workings of the federal system in the era characterized as "dual federalism." This article provides an analysis of these controversies and offers a theoretical position on the problem of real power under federalism. The historical literature, it is argued, provides legal scholars and social scientists with abundant data on the reach, diversity, and effects of governmental action in the different historical epochs of American federalism. The relationship of ...