Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

Mass Communication

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Bowling Online: Examining Social Capital And The Impact Of Internet-Generated Interactions, Alon Gur Jan 2012

Bowling Online: Examining Social Capital And The Impact Of Internet-Generated Interactions, Alon Gur

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

Part of who we are is whom we communicate with. That basic premise, that our family and friends affect our own personality, is accepted even in academic treatises that promote nature over nurture as determinants of personality (McCrae & Costa Jr. et al., 2000). Social capital, as a theory, is directly tied to that notion; we build a fund based on friendship and trust and favors – a trust fund, figuratively – and we “invest” in jobs or other relationships for the sake of personal benefit. Harvard Professor Robert Putnam’s 1995 Journal of Democracy paper and the follow-up book, Bowling Alone, hypothesize that America has declining social capital.

Putnam believes in the power of local relationships: "The ...


The Role Of Feminine Rhetoric In Male Presidential Discourse: Achieving Speech Purpose, Lindsay R. Larner May 2009

The Role Of Feminine Rhetoric In Male Presidential Discourse: Achieving Speech Purpose, Lindsay R. Larner

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

Scholars have defined two gender-associated language styles as rhetorical tools that are used by men and women to achieve certain objectives. Masculine language is commanding and instrumental; it is considered conducive to politics. Feminine language is intimate and unifying; it is considered too passive for politics. However, women introduced feminine rhetoric into politics in the United States in 1920 when they were granted the right to participate. But since then, has feminine-style rhetoric played any role in men politicians’ discourse? Specifically, do they use more feminine speech to establish unity and maintain relationships? By comparison, do they use less of ...