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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

A Call To Peace: How Third-Party Actors And Frameworks Impacted The Peace Processes Of Northern Ireland And Colombia, Esther K. Holm Dec 2018

A Call To Peace: How Third-Party Actors And Frameworks Impacted The Peace Processes Of Northern Ireland And Colombia, Esther K. Holm

Channels: Where Disciplines Meet

Northern Ireland and Colombia both serve as excellent case studies on how the end of the Cold War impacted peace processes. Both countries experienced conflicts that begun in the Cold War era and underwent peace processes in the post-Cold War era. As such, studying them reveals characteristics of post-Cold War peace processes. For example, both Northern Ireland and Colombia showcase the important role that third-party actors play in modern conflict mediation. Both countries benefited greatly from mediation conducted by international organization, other countries, and individuals. Furthermore, both countries demonstrate the importance of frameworks in any successful peace negotiation. This paper ...


Role Theory As An Informative Lens For Understanding The Familial And Political Power Struggles Of Henry Viii And Mary I Of England, Niki Incorvia Jan 2014

Role Theory As An Informative Lens For Understanding The Familial And Political Power Struggles Of Henry Viii And Mary I Of England, Niki Incorvia

Department of Conflict Resolution Studies Theses and Dissertations

This study aims to analyze the application of twentieth century sociologist George Mead's role theory to Henry VIII and Mary I, of Britain's Tudor Dynasty, regarding their treatment of their families during the early to mid-sixteenth century. Contemporary role theory can offer a useful lens to study sixteenth century royal family functionality through an analysis of Henry VIII and Mary I's lives as monarchs of England. Role theory can illuminate the role conflict that led to a separation between Henry and Mary as people and as sovereigns. Their roles, derived from traditional authority, set them apart as ...


Fourth Time's The Charm?: Modeling A Psychologically-Based Peace Iv Program In Northern Ireland, Cailin A. Rogers Jun 2013

Fourth Time's The Charm?: Modeling A Psychologically-Based Peace Iv Program In Northern Ireland, Cailin A. Rogers

The Macalester Review

Abstract: Social conflict has consumed Northern Ireland for centuries. The relationship between Catholic Nationalists and Protestant Loyalists has proved difficult to reconcile–current policy approaches have been unable to attain peace. This paper seeks to explore the gaps in policy created by ignoring the important distinction between the social identities Nationalists and Loyalists have created and which they continue to perpetuate. This paper examines Social identity theory in context of Northern Ireland and applies the psychology of disparate community identities to current policies and trends in Northern Ireland to suggest reasons for a lack of progress towards peace. Unfortunately, contemporary ...


Context And Demonizing The I.R.A., Editor Nov 2002

Context And Demonizing The I.R.A., Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article questions a consensus that the I.R.A. is largely responsible for the recent suspension of Northern Ireland’s home-rule government by the United Kingdom.


Troubled Images: Posters And Images Of The Northern Ireland Conflict From The Linen Hall Library, Belfast, Allan Leonard Dec 2001

Troubled Images: Posters And Images Of The Northern Ireland Conflict From The Linen Hall Library, Belfast, Allan Leonard

Allan Leonard

Troubled Images is the first major publication of the posters of the Northern Ireland conflict. The 124-page book contains 140 illustrations (115 in full colour) and detailed accounts of 70 posters of a travelling international exhibition.

The book includes an overview essay, ‘Visualising the Troubles’, written by Belinda Loftus, an expert on graphic imagery and author of Mirror: Orange and Green.

Informative commentaries to the featured exhibition posters are written by John Gray, Librarian of the Linen Hall Library, Belfast.

Edited by a diverse team of four, and scrutinised by a large project team, the entire spectrum of the Northern ...


The Power Of Symbolism: Disarmament In Northern Ireland, Editor May 2000

The Power Of Symbolism: Disarmament In Northern Ireland, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article explores recent events in Northern Ireland to highlight the import of symbolism in the resolution of political conflict.


What The Meaning Of Is Is: A Disarming Question In Northern Ireland, Editor Feb 2000

What The Meaning Of Is Is: A Disarming Question In Northern Ireland, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article describes problems of meaning related to the latest crisis in implementing the Good Friday agreement of 1998 for Northern Ireland.


The Alliance Party Of Northern Ireland And Power Sharing In A Divided Society, Allan Leonard Dec 1998

The Alliance Party Of Northern Ireland And Power Sharing In A Divided Society, Allan Leonard

Allan Leonard

The government of Northern Ireland from 1920 to 1972 represented a one-party government, or more appropriately, a segmental majority of unionism; Nationalist parties were perpetually unable to, as well as restricted from, achieving control of government. Political processes since then have been to compel Unionists to share power with others. There is more than one way to apply power sharing, with consociational (Lijphart 1977) or integrative (Horowitz 1985; 1991) elements. The result can be a more or less integrated society (Sisk 1996).

My thesis is that with the achievement of the 1998 Agreement, Alliance’s pursuit of a Northern Ireland-integrative ...


Unionism And The Political Party Structure Of Northern Ireland, Allan Leonard Mar 1990

Unionism And The Political Party Structure Of Northern Ireland, Allan Leonard

Allan Leonard

This undergraduate independent study examined Unionist political reaction to developments of British Government policy towards Northern Ireland. Namely, Nationalist representatives achieved redress with the British Government, both directly and vis-a-vis the Irish Government, which should have compelled Unionists to pursue a more accommodationalist policy. Regardless, there was a paradoxical drive by integrationists in Northern Ireland for direct electoral candidacy by the Conservative Party in the regional constituency. This paper makes a defence in favour of this campaign, as a means of improving the accountability of British Government policy affecting those in its jurisdiction.