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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Midterm Decline In Comparative Perspective, Duncan Gans May 2019

Midterm Decline In Comparative Perspective, Duncan Gans

Honors Projects

No abstract provided.


Social Networking Sites (Sns) And Electoral Outcomes: How The Tools/Functions Can Be Used To Predict Electoral Outcomes, Abdul R. Sharif Dec 2017

Social Networking Sites (Sns) And Electoral Outcomes: How The Tools/Functions Can Be Used To Predict Electoral Outcomes, Abdul R. Sharif

Electronic Theses & Dissertations Collection for Atlanta University & Clark Atlanta University

This behavioral study examines the users’ engagement on social networking[ sites (SNS) in electoral races for public office in relation to their act of voting. This study was based on the premise that when certain criteria are met then SNS can be used as a predictive tool. The initial technique used was observations of the tools/functions on SNSs such as the “Like” button, favorable comments, retweets, friends/followers. Another technique used was surveys administered to individuals at political rallies, political debates, and college campuses to further analyze if their online engagement in politics translates to their physical participation. A ...


Height In Politics: The Role Of Height In Electoral Success In The State Of Washington, Joseph Wayne Rebbe Jun 2016

Height In Politics: The Role Of Height In Electoral Success In The State Of Washington, Joseph Wayne Rebbe

Honors Projects

Throughout the history of American presidential elections, the height of candidates has proven to be a statistically significant factor relative to success. This analysis examines whether the same trend applied to Washington State elections over the period 1994-2014. Ultimately, the data shows that Washington electoral results are not subject to change on the basis of candidate height – Washington elections do not reflect the presidential election trend.