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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Grumpy Old Men: A Correlation Between Irritation And Intolerance For Marriage Equality, Aaron J. Shuler Jan 2012

Grumpy Old Men: A Correlation Between Irritation And Intolerance For Marriage Equality, Aaron J. Shuler

Aaron J Shuler

The Gay Equality Movement has made expeditious strides in the last few decades. Most progress in accepting attitudes toward homosexuals has been made in groups that are traditionally associated with liberal views toward minority groups: the young, the educated, and, to a lesser extent, women. This paper seeks to use membership in those groups as control variables to determine whether another less understood independent variable bears on tolerance. Specifically, this paper uses data from the American National Election Survey from 2008-09 and Alan Gerber’s work on the “Big Five” personality traits to determine whether irritated or less agreeable citizens ...


The Great Gun Control War Of The Twentieth Century--And Its Lessons For Gun Laws Today, David B. Kopel Jan 2012

The Great Gun Control War Of The Twentieth Century--And Its Lessons For Gun Laws Today, David B. Kopel

David B Kopel

A movement to ban handguns began in the 1920s in the Northeast, led by the conservative business establishment. In response, the National Rifle Association began to get involved in politics, and was able to defeat handgun prohibition. Gun control and gun rights became the subjects of intense political, social, and cultural battles for much of the rest of the 20th century, and into the 21st.

Often, the battles were a clash of absolutes: One side contended that there was absolutely no right to arms, that defensive gun ownership must be prohibited, and that gun ownership for sporting purposes could be ...


Citizens United And The Ineluctable Question Of Corporate Citizenship, Amy Sepinwall Dec 2011

Citizens United And The Ineluctable Question Of Corporate Citizenship, Amy Sepinwall

Amy J. Sepinwall

As a result of the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United, corporations and individuals now enjoy the same rights to spend money on ads supporting or opposing candidates for office. Those concerned about the role of money in politics have much to decry about the decision. But the threat to democracy posed by allowing wealthy corporations to function as political speakers arises as well under a regime that allows wealthy individuals to do so. If we are not prepared to limit individuals’ expenditures on political speech, we will have to find a way to distinguish individuals’ and corporations’ free ...