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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Disputed Theory And Security Policy: Responding To The "Rise Of China", Joseph K. Clifton Jan 2011

Disputed Theory And Security Policy: Responding To The "Rise Of China", Joseph K. Clifton

CMC Senior Theses

Much has been written on the security implications of the "Rise of China," yet there is little consensus, posing a problem for policymakers. I highlight the areas of disagreement, arguing that the lack of consensus is a product of different theoretical positions. Since there is not an obviously correct theoretical position, policymakers must make decisions based on significant uncertainty. I argue that policymakers ought therefore reject costly and decontextualized theories, such as offensive realism, while still maintaining openness to theoretical knowledge.


The Gift That Keeps Giving: Fdi Inflows In China, Joseph Chang Jan 2011

The Gift That Keeps Giving: Fdi Inflows In China, Joseph Chang

CMC Senior Theses

This paper investigates the primacy of foreign direct investment inflows in liberalizing China’s economy and whether the long-term gains from economic openness will justify its inefficient energy uses and growing regional income disparities. By examining the history of FDI inflows in China, it becomes evident that FDI inflows were an instrumental part in institutional and technological development in China. I extend the argument to take into account how these developed infrastructures react to China’s growing energy demand in light of a shrinking world supply. Lastly, I perform a meta-analysis on the Environmental Kuznets Curve theory and the Pollution ...


The People’S Republic Of China’S Stance On Human Rights In Selected Crises, Brian T. Kopczynski Jan 2011

The People’S Republic Of China’S Stance On Human Rights In Selected Crises, Brian T. Kopczynski

CMC Senior Theses

This paper examines China’s policy towards human rights internationally with the intent of discerning real support for human rights. It compares China’s responses to two cases of mass human rights violations (the Darfur and Israel-Palestine conflicts) in which it has a serious interest (energy in particular). It finds that China treats human rights self-interestedly, but also has some support for them when its interests are not at stake.