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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Communist China In The 1950s: A Case Study Of Non-Recognized States, Aidan Richard Barry Jan 2018

Communist China In The 1950s: A Case Study Of Non-Recognized States, Aidan Richard Barry

Senior Projects Spring 2018

This paper will attempt to examine the pitfalls of non-recognition through an examination of China in the 1940s and 50s. China in this era faced many challenges ranging from war with foreign powers, issues of economic development, and poor relations with its neighbors in addition to its lack of UN membership and formal diplomatic recognition. In the absence of high level diplomatic relations with many nations and UN membership, the main venue for Chinese diplomacy was international conferences such as the Bandung and Geneva Conferences. This paper will argue for the use of such conferences both as a status enhancer ...


Pacific Confrontations: Historical Lessons For The Sino-American Strategic Relationship, Graham Trumbull Clark Jan 2016

Pacific Confrontations: Historical Lessons For The Sino-American Strategic Relationship, Graham Trumbull Clark

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Social Studies of Bard College


Presidential Power In Foreign Policy: Richard Nixon And The Era Of Détente With The Soviet Union And China, Gregory Donald Drilling Jan 2016

Presidential Power In Foreign Policy: Richard Nixon And The Era Of Détente With The Soviet Union And China, Gregory Donald Drilling

Senior Projects Spring 2016

This project analyzes the role and limits of the presidential policy-making in foreign policy through an examination of President Richard Nixon’s policy of détente with the Soviet Union and China during the 1960s and 1970s.

I will ultimately present a set of four components that I argue played a role in enabling Nixon to pursue détente at the time he did. The four consequential factors include the following: First, domestic conditions exist in which the general public is focused primarily on domestic policy. Second, the existing international conditions allow for a change in foreign policy. Third, when a president ...