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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Daleyd_Abelt_Stephanm_2019_Us_Climate_Risk_Governance_Efficacy_Wpsa_Final.Pdf, Dorothy Daley, Troy D. Abel, Mark Stephan Apr 2019

Daleyd_Abelt_Stephanm_2019_Us_Climate_Risk_Governance_Efficacy_Wpsa_Final.Pdf, Dorothy Daley, Troy D. Abel, Mark Stephan

Troy D. Abel

In the United States, the political and governance challenges embedded in climate change
are perhaps the most daunting. While conventional logic holds that national and international
action is needed to address a problem of this magnitude, within the United States, subnational
governments have been considerably more active in pursuing climate change mitigation policy
compared to their federal counterparts. We take up Elinor Ostrom's charge to consider
polycentric climate governance and evaluate the extent to which subnational policy initiatives
improve GHG emission trends. In this paper, we explore different types of subnational policy
approaches to minimize GHG emissions. We capitalize ...


No Witness, No Case: An Assessment Of The Conduct And Quality Of Icc Investigations, Dermot Groome Apr 2019

No Witness, No Case: An Assessment Of The Conduct And Quality Of Icc Investigations, Dermot Groome

Dermot M Groome

The conduct and quality of investigations pursued by the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court have come under increasing scrutiny and criticism from judges on the Court. Criticism is directed at the time and length of investigations; the quality of the evidence advanced in court; the inappropriate delegation of investigative functions, and the failure to interview witnesses in a way that is consistent with the Prosecution’s obligation to conduct investigations fairly under Article 54 of the Rome Statute. This essay explores these criticisms and concludes that the judges are justified in their concerns regarding the Prosecution ...


Habeas Corpus In The Age Of Guantánamo, Cary Federman Apr 2019

Habeas Corpus In The Age Of Guantánamo, Cary Federman

Cary Federman

The purpose of the article is to examine the meaning of habeas corpus in the age of the war on terror and the detention camps at Guantanamo Bay. Since the war on terror was declared in 2001, the writ has been invoked from quarters not normally considered within the federal courts’ domain. In this article, I set out to do two things: first, I provide an overview of the writ’s history in the United States and explain its connection to federalism and unlawful executive detention. I then set out to bridge the two meanings of habeas corpus. Second, then ...


Fear Or Rage?: Assessing Public Opinion And Policy Responses To Terrorist Attacks, Gabriel Rubin Mar 2019

Fear Or Rage?: Assessing Public Opinion And Policy Responses To Terrorist Attacks, Gabriel Rubin

Gabriel Rubin

Mass fear has been posited as the main emotional outcome of terror attacks. Indeed, the term “terrorism” itself emphasizes that such attacks are meant to stoke fear. Yet, a critical piece of the post-terror attack dynamic has been largely ignored: the public rage that comes in response to terror attacks. Witness the call for politicians to step down after the November 2008 attacks in Mumbai or the placard reading “Nuke ‘Em Till They Glow” at the 2001 World Series. It is the contention of this paper that, after a major terror attack has occurred, the public is more angry than ...


She Who Laughs Loudest: A Meditation On Zen Humor, Andrew Whitehead Mar 2019

She Who Laughs Loudest: A Meditation On Zen Humor, Andrew Whitehead

Andrew K. Whitehead

Articulating a Zen Buddhist perspective on humor, this paper examines the Japanese Zen Buddhist response of humor in the face of the suffering of situated existence and the motivations for this response. The examination will take the school of Rinzai Zen Buddhism as its exemplar. I argue that in order to appreciate the function of humor in Zen a number of cultural and historical influences must be considered: correlative ontology; the Buddhist notion of emptiness; the impotence of language; sense and nonsense; and the senselessness of transgression.


Translating Scholarship Into Policy, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Amy C. Gaudion Jan 2019

Translating Scholarship Into Policy, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Amy C. Gaudion

Amy C. Gaudion

There is an ever widening gap between conflict resolution policy makers and scholars—a tragedy given practitioners’ dire need for new ideas to help resolve deadly conflicts and the growing knowledge researchers have to share. Research tends to swing like a pendulum between analytic and rigorous methods and accessible and relevant approaches. We reject this tradeoff. We believe that research can be simultaneously rigorous and relevant, and analytic and accessible. Given the devastating loss of life associated with armed conflict, the need for translating research results into policy prescriptions is especially strong in peacemaking. The goal of this issue of ...


Sex Segregation As Policy Problem: A Gendered Policy Paradox, Elizabeth Sharrow Jan 2019

Sex Segregation As Policy Problem: A Gendered Policy Paradox, Elizabeth Sharrow

Elizabeth Sharrow


2017 marked the forty-fifth anniversary of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, a sex non-discrimination policy which remade American education and athletics. Has Title IX fulfilled its promise to end discriminatory and disparate treatment of women in educational institutions? This article places policy in conversation with scholarly debate over tackling persistent sex and gender inequalities, illustrating that the athletic policy sphere sits at the center of both addressing and reproducing sexism.  It examines the under-appreciated complexity of sex equity politics and suggests the need to question how well public policy addresses inequalities.  It argues that we are losing ...