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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Token Representation?: Impact Of Female Reservations In Panchayati Raj Institutions In Elections To State And National Legislatures, Surbhi Bharadwaj Sep 2019

Token Representation?: Impact Of Female Reservations In Panchayati Raj Institutions In Elections To State And National Legislatures, Surbhi Bharadwaj

Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Politics, Economics and World Affairs

Reservations have long formed a fundamental tenet of affirmative action in India. Quotas for representation of various disadvantaged groups proliferate across public educational institutions and government jobs. However, elections to public office have largely escaped such quotas, except those that are caste-based. A shift in this status quo occurred in 1992 with the establishment of the Panchayati Raj system of grassroots governance. 34% of all seats under Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs) were to be reserved for women under the 73rd amendment. Another constitutional amendment passed in September 2009 increased PRI quotas for women to 50%. This paper seeks to examine ...


Volume I | Issue Ii | 2019.Pdf, Dujpew Editorial Board Sep 2019

Volume I | Issue Ii | 2019.Pdf, Dujpew Editorial Board

Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Politics, Economics and World Affairs

No abstract provided.


The Colonial Violence Of “Non-Violent” Resistance, Tanya Dushatska Jan 2019

The Colonial Violence Of “Non-Violent” Resistance, Tanya Dushatska

Dialogues: Undergraduate Research in Philosophy, History, and Politics

In his paper “On Violence,” Frantz Fanon argues for the crucial role of violence in achieving decolonization and asserts that the notion of “non-violent resistance” is introduced and upheld by those who are ultimately interested in preserving the capitalist colonial structure (Fanon 1;22). Fanon argues for the necessity of violence, claiming only violence can dislodge a regime that is itself established and maintained through violence, and that violence grants a sense of agency to the colonized people (2; 4; 6; 22; 10; 21; 51). I open this paper with an exposition and defence of Fanon’s two arguments for ...