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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Review Of The Origins Of Collective Decision Making By Andy Blunden (Boston: Brill, 2016)., Timothy J. Shaffer Apr 2019

Review Of The Origins Of Collective Decision Making By Andy Blunden (Boston: Brill, 2016)., Timothy J. Shaffer

Journal of Public Deliberation

Review of The Origins of Collective Decision Making by Andy Blunden (Boston: Brill, 2016).


Democratic Self-Determination And The Intentional Building Of Consensus, Valeria Ottonelli Apr 2019

Democratic Self-Determination And The Intentional Building Of Consensus, Valeria Ottonelli

Journal of Public Deliberation

This paper defends two fundamental but under-theorized insights coming from the theory of deliberative democracy. The first is that consensus is valuable as a precondition of democratic collective self-determination, since it ensures that democratic decisions display an adequate degree of integrity and consistency and therefore that the polity can act as a unified agent. The second is that consensus in this integrity-building role is essential if citizens need to act as decision-makers; it ensures that the decisions that issue from the exercise of their political rights are meaningful, and that they are so as the intended result of their joint ...


Deliberation After Consensus: Introduction To The Symposium, Henrik Friberg-Fernros, Johan Karlsson Schaffer, Cathrine Holst Apr 2019

Deliberation After Consensus: Introduction To The Symposium, Henrik Friberg-Fernros, Johan Karlsson Schaffer, Cathrine Holst

Journal of Public Deliberation

This editorial introduction presents an overview of the themes explored in the symposium on Deliberation after Consensus. For all the talk of its obsolescence and irrelevance, the concept of consensus still remains centrally contested through generations of deliberative democracy scholarship. In face of criticism for being neither empirically feasible nor normatively desirable, some deliberative theorists have moved away from consensus-oriented teleology and argued in favor of other legitimate outcomes of deliberations. Other theorists have resisted this move, claiming that the aim of deliberation implies that consensus should remain as a regulative ideal for deliberative outcomes. Engaging with these debates about ...