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2019

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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Jews And The Culture Wars: Consensus And Dissensus In Jewish Religious Liberty Advocacy, Michael A. Helfand May 2019

Jews And The Culture Wars: Consensus And Dissensus In Jewish Religious Liberty Advocacy, Michael A. Helfand

San Diego Law Review

In the recent culture wars, traditionalists and progressives have clashed over dueling conceptions of family, sexuality and religion—manifested in debates over abortion, contraception, and same-sex marriage. Caught in this conflict has been a political and cultural reassessment of religious liberty; a doctrine originally seen as necessary to protect faith commitments from majoritarian persecution, the public salience of religious liberty has waned as it has clashed with the rights of women and LGBT people. And these evolving commitments to dueling rights have triggered religious, political, and ideological realignments, generating new alliances across political and faith communities.

In this new environment ...


Review Of The Origins Of Collective Decision Making By Andy Blunden (Boston: Brill, 2016)., Timothy J. Shaffer Apr 2019

Review Of The Origins Of Collective Decision Making By Andy Blunden (Boston: Brill, 2016)., Timothy J. Shaffer

Journal of Public Deliberation

Review of The Origins of Collective Decision Making by Andy Blunden (Boston: Brill, 2016).


Democratic Self-Determination And The Intentional Building Of Consensus, Valeria Ottonelli Apr 2019

Democratic Self-Determination And The Intentional Building Of Consensus, Valeria Ottonelli

Journal of Public Deliberation

This paper defends two fundamental but under-theorized insights coming from the theory of deliberative democracy. The first is that consensus is valuable as a precondition of democratic collective self-determination, since it ensures that democratic decisions display an adequate degree of integrity and consistency and therefore that the polity can act as a unified agent. The second is that consensus in this integrity-building role is essential if citizens need to act as decision-makers; it ensures that the decisions that issue from the exercise of their political rights are meaningful, and that they are so as the intended result of their joint ...


Recognition And Deliberation: A Deliberative Corrective To Liberal Multicultural Policies, Nicolas Pirsoul Apr 2019

Recognition And Deliberation: A Deliberative Corrective To Liberal Multicultural Policies, Nicolas Pirsoul

Journal of Public Deliberation

This article establishes theoretical and practical distinctions between the theory of recognition and liberal multiculturalism. Five potential issues with multicultural policies are identified. The article argues that an increase in deliberative practices could solve many pitfalls of liberal multicultural policies and highlights how a “deliberative turn” could reconcile identity-related policies with the philosophical roots of the theory of recognition. The paper also highlights some challenges arising from a deliberative approach to recognition.


Civic Virtue In The Deliberative System, Daniel Hutton Ferris Apr 2019

Civic Virtue In The Deliberative System, Daniel Hutton Ferris

Journal of Public Deliberation

The normative stability of a deliberative and democratic political order and the creativity and quality of the decisions its produces depend on citizens developing civic orientations and capacities through participation in deliberative events aiming at the cooperative solution of political problems. That, at least, is the claim made by critics of the systems approach to deliberative democracy, who argue that its proponents have lost sight of the educative function that respectful public reasoning plays for citizens. In this article I offer a response to this line of argument. There is no good philosophical reason to suppose that only unitary deliberation ...


Three Coins In The Fountain: The Mueller Report And Russian Active Measures, Editor Apr 2019

Three Coins In The Fountain: The Mueller Report And Russian Active Measures, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article identifies non-political elements of Russian Federation political warfare as inferred from the Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election.


Fatal Attractions, Elective Affinities, And Deadly Epistemologies, Editor Apr 2019

Fatal Attractions, Elective Affinities, And Deadly Epistemologies, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article cites film, the novel, and news report to underline the deadly seriousness of the quest for knowledge.


Wisdom (Hikmah) As Perceived By Iranian Muslim Scholars: Reflections On Ibn Sina, Ghazali, And Suhrawardi, Leyla H. Tajer, Amir H. Zekrgoo Apr 2019

Wisdom (Hikmah) As Perceived By Iranian Muslim Scholars: Reflections On Ibn Sina, Ghazali, And Suhrawardi, Leyla H. Tajer, Amir H. Zekrgoo

Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Multidisciplinary Studies

The evolution of the concept of spiritual/religious wisdom (ḥikamt) by the Iranian Muslim philosophers from the 10th to 12th century, may be studied under three main trends namely Mashā’i (Peripatetic), Kalām (theology), and Ishrāq (Illumination). Despite the correlation among these trends each of them grew independently. Among the three, the Hikmat-i Ishrāq (Illumination Wisdom) which is also known as Ḥikamt-i Dhawqi (Intuitive Wisdom) of Shahab al-Din Suhrawardi (1153-1191) found a special place as it tended to bring together the philosophical and theological aspects of wisdom. This survey would address the development of ikmat (wisdom) among ...


Espionage: Why Did Hanssen Do It?, Editor Apr 2019

Espionage: Why Did Hanssen Do It?, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article describes speculative elements of a post-dictive profile on Robert P. Hanssen’s convictions for espionage and conspiracy.


The Political Psychology Of Crossroads, Editor Mar 2019

The Political Psychology Of Crossroads, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article elaborates on how the construct of crossroads has situated within political psychological discourse.


A Political Psychology Of Obituary, Editor Mar 2019

A Political Psychology Of Obituary, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article ascribes political psychological relevance to the recent death of Russian critic and documentarian Maya Turovskaya.


Popular Culture And The Psychology Of The Insider Threat, Editor Mar 2019

Popular Culture And The Psychology Of The Insider Threat, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article illustrates an identification between pop culture and an important intelligence, law enforcement, and security issue.


The Political Psychology Of Death: Until It Do Us Part, Editor Feb 2019

The Political Psychology Of Death: Until It Do Us Part, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article describes interwoven complexities and psychologies of life and death in the lives of political actors.


“I’Ll Be Your Mirror”, The Soul, And Intelligence And Counterintelligence Applications, Editor Feb 2019

“I’Ll Be Your Mirror”, The Soul, And Intelligence And Counterintelligence Applications, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article describes how the psychological trope of mirroring can explicate mass leadership and betrayals of trust.


When Is Terrorism All In The Family?, Editor Feb 2019

When Is Terrorism All In The Family?, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article describes putative linkages between family relationships and kinds of terrorism.


Psychologies Of Going Nuclear, Editor Feb 2019

Psychologies Of Going Nuclear, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article identifies multiple psychologies affecting joining and withdrawing from nuclear weapons agreements.


The Us Government Shutdown: When Is Personality Shut Out?, Editor Jan 2019

The Us Government Shutdown: When Is Personality Shut Out?, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article identifies factors influencing how significant a leader’s personality affects political decision making and behavior.


Psychology Of Cargo Cults And Contemporary Cargo Security, Editor Jan 2019

Psychology Of Cargo Cults And Contemporary Cargo Security, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article describes a convergence between the psychology of cargo cults and contemporary cargo security


Do Government Shut Downs Shut Down Aviation Security?, Editor Jan 2019

Do Government Shut Downs Shut Down Aviation Security?, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

There have been reports of a growing number of Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents calling in sick and refusing to work for no pay (1). The immediate question becomes, what’s the impact on aviation security? The answer is a negative one, but not as negative as one might think, and one only adding to festering, pre-shutdown problems.


The Colonial Violence Of “Non-Violent” Resistance, Tanya Dushatska Jan 2019

The Colonial Violence Of “Non-Violent” Resistance, Tanya Dushatska

Dialogues: Undergraduate Research in Philosophy, History, and Politics

In his paper “On Violence,” Frantz Fanon argues for the crucial role of violence in achieving decolonization and asserts that the notion of “non-violent resistance” is introduced and upheld by those who are ultimately interested in preserving the capitalist colonial structure (Fanon 1;22). Fanon argues for the necessity of violence, claiming only violence can dislodge a regime that is itself established and maintained through violence, and that violence grants a sense of agency to the colonized people (2; 4; 6; 22; 10; 21; 51). I open this paper with an exposition and defence of Fanon’s two arguments for ...


[Review] Jacob Bull, Tora Holmberg And Cecilia Åsberg, Editors, Animal Places: Lively Cartographies Of Human-Animal Relations. Routledge, 2018. 276pp, Zoei Sutton Jan 2019

[Review] Jacob Bull, Tora Holmberg And Cecilia Åsberg, Editors, Animal Places: Lively Cartographies Of Human-Animal Relations. Routledge, 2018. 276pp, Zoei Sutton

Animal Studies Journal

It’s 2016 and rats are ‘taking over’ in Malmö, Sweden. Forced out of the sewers by flooding, the sight of usually-hidden rats now visible on streets and playgrounds (not to mention their dead bodies in the river) has humans calling for sanitation through eradication to ‘restore’ social order. In daring to exist ‘out of place’ in their search for food the rats ‘turn from tolerated, illegitimate, but invisible waste-workers, to ‘trash animals’ (1). This dramatic scene which opens Animal Places ‘shows how space, place and human-animal relations intersect, thereby producing diversity of effect, boundary work and political action’ (1 ...


First Dog, Last Dog: New Intertextual Short Fictions About Canis Lupus Familiaris, A. Frances Johnson Jan 2019

First Dog, Last Dog: New Intertextual Short Fictions About Canis Lupus Familiaris, A. Frances Johnson

Animal Studies Journal

The double short story sequence ‘First Dog, Last Dog’ explores interdependencies between domesticated animals and humans. The first story, ‘The Death of the First Dog’, re-reads and quotes from Homer’s The Odyssey and the encounter between Odysseus and his aged hunting dog Argos. Its companion piece, ‘The Carrying’, is set in a speculative future. Exploiting qualities of the Borghesian fable, both tales are interspecies tales of love and loss. This work was read at the 2018 Melbourne Writers Festival ‘Animal Church’ event curated by Dr Laura McKay.


Life And Death With Horses: Gillian Mears’ Novel Foal’S Bread, Deborah Wardle Jan 2019

Life And Death With Horses: Gillian Mears’ Novel Foal’S Bread, Deborah Wardle

Animal Studies Journal

Gillian Mears’ novel Foal’s Bread (2011) invites an examination of horses in fiction, opening a platform for exploring the horse in Australian literature from a zoocritical perspective. This paper argues that writing horses into stories involves addressing, indeed flouting the ‘sin’ of anthropomorphism. The problems and paradoxes of ascribing subjectivity to fictional equine characters are discussed. The death of the main equine character, Magpie, is framed as a site of disregard, an example of human disconnection from the lives and deaths of animals. Using excerpts from the award-wining novel, Foal’s Bread, as well as examples from other equine ...


If Animals Could Talk: Reflection On The Dutch Party For Animals In Student Assignments, Helen Kopnina Jan 2019

If Animals Could Talk: Reflection On The Dutch Party For Animals In Student Assignments, Helen Kopnina

Animal Studies Journal

This article explores how concern about animal welfare and animal rights relates to ecological citizenship by discussing student assignments written about the Dutch Party for Animals or PvdD. ‘Animal welfare’, ‘animal rights’, and ‘ecological citizenship’ perspectives offer insights into strategic choices of eco-representatives and animal rights/welfare advocates as well as educators. The assignments balance animal issues with socio-economic ones, explore the relationship between sustainability and ethics, and attribute responsibility for unsustainable or unethical practices. Analysis of student assignments reveals nuanced positions on the anthropocentrism-ecocentrism continuum, showing students’ ability to critically rethink their place within larger environmental systems. Some students ...


Kaimangatanga: Maori Perspectives On Veganism And Plant-Based Kai, Kirsty Dunn Jan 2019

Kaimangatanga: Maori Perspectives On Veganism And Plant-Based Kai, Kirsty Dunn

Animal Studies Journal

In this paper – drawing from a range of food blogs and social media pages – I consider both the ways in which Māori writers discuss some of the barriers and cultural conflicts experienced within the realm of vegan ethics, as well as their perspectives on various facets of Te Ao Māori (the Māori world) such as kaitiakitanga (guardianship), hauora (holistic health and wellbeing), and rangatiratanga (sovereignty) which have influenced their attitudes and approaches towards veganism and plant-based diets. I argue that these diverse perspectives provide a valuable means of analysing and critiquing both the dominant ethics and attitudes which perpetuate the ...


[Review] Joshua Lobb, The Flight Of Birds. Sydney University Press, 2019. 322pp, Alex Lockwood Jan 2019

[Review] Joshua Lobb, The Flight Of Birds. Sydney University Press, 2019. 322pp, Alex Lockwood

Animal Studies Journal

Why, one could ask, does such a high proportion of the very best works of recently published literary and creative prose, which choose to engage with climate change, environmental shock, biodiversity crises, and extinction risks – the existential threats we face as a global multispecies population – all tell stories with and of nonhuman animals? My theory, one shared by Amitav Ghosh in The Great Derangement (although with differing conclusions) is that the very nature of the threats we face is a reckoning with our alienation from the nonhuman world. It is a reckoning we need to have, without ‘hiding’ away from ...


[Review] Sue Coe, Zooicide: Seeing Cruelty, Demanding Abolition. With An Essay By Stephen F. Eisenman Ak Press, 2018. 128pp, Wendy Woodward Jan 2019

[Review] Sue Coe, Zooicide: Seeing Cruelty, Demanding Abolition. With An Essay By Stephen F. Eisenman Ak Press, 2018. 128pp, Wendy Woodward

Animal Studies Journal

Eisenman imagines, in 2050, in a scenario devoutly to be wished and striven for, that animals are no longer ill-treated in zoos, factory farms or laboratories. His informative essay substantiates debates in animal ethics, historically and in art, relating the ‘thingification’ of animals to colonial notions of ‘racial’ superiority. Sue Coe’s work, he demonstrates, comes from a long history of protest against the treatment of animals in zoos and menageries. Like John Berger in Why Look at Animals? (Penguin, 2009), he connects zoos with money-making, dismissing the claims that zoos are geared for conservation. Eisenman regards Sue Coe as ...


Animal Studies Journal 2019 8 (1): Cover Page, Table Of Contents, Editorial And Notes On Contributors, Melissa Boyde Jan 2019

Animal Studies Journal 2019 8 (1): Cover Page, Table Of Contents, Editorial And Notes On Contributors, Melissa Boyde

Animal Studies Journal

Animal Studies Journal 2019 8 (1): Cover Page, Table of Contents, Editorial and Notes on Contributors.


Provocations From The Field - Derangement And Resistance: Reflections From Under The Glare Of An Angry Emu, Pattrice Jones Jan 2019

Provocations From The Field - Derangement And Resistance: Reflections From Under The Glare Of An Angry Emu, Pattrice Jones

Animal Studies Journal

The situations of emus may illuminate the maladies of human societies. From the colonialism that led Europeans to tamper with Australian ecosystems through the militarism that mandated the Great Emu War of 1932 to the consumer capitalism that sparked a global market for ‘exotic’ emus and their products, habits of belief and behaviour that hurt humans have wreaked havoc on emus. Literally de-ranged, emus abroad today endure all of the estrangements of émigrés in addition to the frustrations and sorrows of captivity. In Australia, free emus struggle to survive as climate change parches already diminished and polluted habitats. We have ...


Is There A Turtle In This Text? Animals In The Internet Of Robots And Things, Nicola J. Evans, Alison Rotha Moore Jan 2019

Is There A Turtle In This Text? Animals In The Internet Of Robots And Things, Nicola J. Evans, Alison Rotha Moore

Animal Studies Journal

This essay looks at the paradigm shift underway in human relations with artefacts from an animal studies perspective. As the Internet of Things (IoT) produces objects that are smart, sensate and agentive, how does this impact the continuing struggle for recognition of these same qualities in nonhuman animals? As humans acquire new digital companions in the form of therapeutic robots, what happens to perceptions of other ‘companion species’? Nonhuman animals are ubiquitous in IoT discourse as researchers draw on animal metaphors, models and analogies to think through the social and ethical implications of these new technologies. Focusing on representative texts ...