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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Political Economy Of Amazon Deforestation: Subnational Development And The Uneven Reach Of The Colombian State, Javier Revelo-Rebolledo Jan 2019

The Political Economy Of Amazon Deforestation: Subnational Development And The Uneven Reach Of The Colombian State, Javier Revelo-Rebolledo

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

The recent peace process between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) has prompted radical changes in the country’s Amazon region. A decrease in violence has been accompanied by an increase in deforestation, suggesting that good things do not always come together. My dissertation studies the political economy of Amazon deforestation through a cross-disciplinary analysis linking studies of modern state formation with tropical deforestation. As such, it offers an empirically grounded explanation for differential levels of deforestation in the Colombian Amazon. Employing a mixed-methods research strategy, I reviewed historical archives on regional development, interviewed more ...


Identity In The Wake Of The State: Local, National, And Supranational Dynamics Of The Syrian Conflict, Victoria Gilbert Jan 2019

Identity In The Wake Of The State: Local, National, And Supranational Dynamics Of The Syrian Conflict, Victoria Gilbert

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

While much of the civil war literature considers the impact religious or ethnic identities have on the character or duration of conflict, scholars have failed to address why different identities become salient in territories outside the state’s control. Using subnational case studies from the Syrian conflict, I claim that we must consider the interests and character of those actors who strive to attain authority and build governing institutions in the absence of the state. I find that civilian actors are more likely to promote local identities, such as clan, tribal, or city-based identities. Armed groups, however, are more likely ...