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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Norms, Law And The Impeachment Power, John M. Greabe Sep 2017

Norms, Law And The Impeachment Power, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

[Excerpt]

"Most experts believe that, while a president can be criminally prosecuted after leaving office, he cannot be prosecuted while he is president. And while the president may be sued civilly while holding office, the office confers powerful immunities and other constitutional defenses that are unavailable to ordinary civilian defendants."


Newsroom: Golocalprov: Vargas '20 On Trump And The Future Of The Ri Gop 08-17-2017, Golocalprov Political Team, Roger Williams University School Of Law Aug 2017

Newsroom: Golocalprov: Vargas '20 On Trump And The Future Of The Ri Gop 08-17-2017, Golocalprov Political Team, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Political Action And Your Library Association, Elsa Loftis Aug 2017

Political Action And Your Library Association, Elsa Loftis

OLA Quarterly

Political action. Libraries. The two seem to intersect more often than one might expect (unless one is a library worker, supporter, or patron; in which case it doesn’t seem terribly unusual). People in our line of work are often called upon to assume the mantle of library-worker-activists. These calls to action affect us in our various roles as professionals, as private citizens, and as members of the Oregon Library Association.

Our association supports Oregon libraries, the people who work in them, and the communities we serve. That commitment casts a wide net in a large state full of people ...


The Origins And Boundaries Of Executive Privilege, John M. Greabe Jul 2017

The Origins And Boundaries Of Executive Privilege, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

[Excerpt] "When the president or persons working with the president are under investigation . . . the doctrine of executive privilege -which entitles the president to keep confidential certain communications to and from his advisers -inevitably becomes relevant."


The Presidency And The Media: An Analysis Of The Fundamental Role Of The Traditional Press For American Democracy, Lauren Mannerberg May 2017

The Presidency And The Media: An Analysis Of The Fundamental Role Of The Traditional Press For American Democracy, Lauren Mannerberg

Political Science

The President is the most important political figure in the United States and as such he is a large topic in the news media. Despite seemly large changes in recent years with new media, an unprecedented presence in the White House, and shifts in the political nature of the nation, the press’s fundamental role in reporting on the Presidency has not changed in our democracy. Democracy needs a free press in order to have an informed citizenry and throughout American history this freedom has remained constant. A history of journalism and the presidency reveals that although the press has ...


2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest Honorable Mention--On Freedom Of Expression, Emily Baehner Jan 2017

2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest Honorable Mention--On Freedom Of Expression, Emily Baehner

Constitution Day Essay Contest

No abstract provided.


The State House And The White House: Gubernatorial Rhetoric During The Obama Administration, Austin Peyton Trantham Jan 2017

The State House And The White House: Gubernatorial Rhetoric During The Obama Administration, Austin Peyton Trantham

Theses and Dissertations--Political Science

What is the importance of political speechmaking? Do state governors discuss presidential priorities? This study addresses these questions by analyzing the contents of annual State of the State addresses given by governors from 2012 to 2014 during the presidency of Barack Obama. A descriptive paper provides evidence that governors primarily discuss employment and economic issues in their addresses, are discussing greater number of policy issues than in previous decades, and are delivering their address before the presidential State of the Union message. Examining health care and immigration policy in separate empirical papers, I theorize that contextual factors, including legislative partisanship ...


2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest 3rd Place--The Fine Line Between Criticism And Control: How The Trump Administration Is Weakening Freedom Of The Press, Michael Di Girolamo Jan 2017

2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest 3rd Place--The Fine Line Between Criticism And Control: How The Trump Administration Is Weakening Freedom Of The Press, Michael Di Girolamo

Constitution Day Essay Contest

No abstract provided.


2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest Honorable Mention--Liberty And Responsibility, Callum Case Jan 2017

2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest Honorable Mention--Liberty And Responsibility, Callum Case

Constitution Day Essay Contest

No abstract provided.


2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest 1st Place--Donald Trump: The Modern Day Killer Of The First Amendment, Ryann Schoenbaechler Jan 2017

2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest 1st Place--Donald Trump: The Modern Day Killer Of The First Amendment, Ryann Schoenbaechler

Constitution Day Essay Contest

No abstract provided.


2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest Honorable Mention--On The Consequences Of “Free Speech”, Duncan Barron Jan 2017

2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest Honorable Mention--On The Consequences Of “Free Speech”, Duncan Barron

Constitution Day Essay Contest

No abstract provided.


2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest 2nd Place, Kelsey Mattingly Jan 2017

2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest 2nd Place, Kelsey Mattingly

Constitution Day Essay Contest

No abstract provided.


In Defense Of The Electoral College, Allen C. Guelzo, James H. Hulme Jan 2017

In Defense Of The Electoral College, Allen C. Guelzo, James H. Hulme

Civil War Era Studies Faculty Publications

There is hardly anything in the Constitution harder to explain, or easier to misunderstand, than the Electoral College. And when a presidential election hands the palm to a candidate who comes in second in the popular vote but first in the Electoral College tally, something deep in our democratic viscera balks and asks why the Electoral College shouldn’t be dumped as a useless relic of 18th century white, gentry privilege. Actually, there have been only five occasions when a closely divided popular vote and the electoral vote have failed to point in the same direction. No matter. After last ...