Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

To Plead Our Own Cause: African Americans In Massachusetts And The Making Of The Antislavery Movement, Christopher Cameron Jun 2014

To Plead Our Own Cause: African Americans In Massachusetts And The Making Of The Antislavery Movement, Christopher Cameron

American Abolitionism and Antislavery

The antislavery movement entered an important new phase when William Lloyd Garrison began publishing the Liberator in 1831—a phase marked by massive petition campaigns, the extraordinary mobilization of female activists, and the creation of organizations such as the American Anti-Slavery Society. While the period from 1831 to 1865 is known as the heyday of radical abolitionism, the work of Garrison’s predecessors in Massachusetts was critical in laying the foundation for antebellum abolitionism. To Plead Our Own Cause explores the significant contributions of African Americans in the Bay State to both local and nationwide antislavery activity before 1831 and ...


Naccs 41st Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies Apr 2014

Naccs 41st Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies

NACCS Conference Programs

Fragmented Landscapes in Chicana and Chicano Studies: Deliberation, Innovation or Extinction?
April 9-12, 2014
Hilton Salt Lake City Center


American Military Strategy In The Vietnam War, 1965– 1973, Gregory A. Daddis Jan 2014

American Military Strategy In The Vietnam War, 1965– 1973, Gregory A. Daddis

History Faculty Books and Book Chapters

For nearly a decade, American combat soldiers fought in South Vietnam to help sustain an independent, noncommunist nation in Southeast Asia. After U.S. troops departed in 1973, the collapse of South Vietnam in 1975 prompted a lasting search to explain the United States’ first lost war. Historians of the conflict and participants alike have since critiqued the ways in which civilian policymakers and uniformed leaders applied—some argued misapplied—military power that led to such an undesirable political outcome. While some claimed U.S. politicians failed to commit their nation’s full military might to a limited war, others ...


Rendering To God And Caesar: Critical Readings For American Government, Mark Caleb Smith, Jewerl Maxwell, Marc A. Clauson, Kevin F. Sims, David L. Rich, Andrew Travis Jan 2014

Rendering To God And Caesar: Critical Readings For American Government, Mark Caleb Smith, Jewerl Maxwell, Marc A. Clauson, Kevin F. Sims, David L. Rich, Andrew Travis

Faculty Books

To understand American government is, at minimum, to recognize religion's profound influence on our culture and, by extension, our politics." So state the editors of this outstanding collection of 55 readings that survey the function and purpose of American government from its founding to the present. Rendering to God and Caesar is mostly comprised of primary sources, including founding documents, Supreme Court cases, and momentous speeches. Grouped into six unifying sections with introductions that tie the individual works together and point to their significance, each article is introduced as well by brief comments to highlight specific features or issues ...