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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

What Is Islamic Democracy? The Three Cs Of Islamic Governance, Muqtedar Khan Dec 2014

What Is Islamic Democracy? The Three Cs Of Islamic Governance, Muqtedar Khan

Muqtedar Khan

This book chapter explores the three Cs of Islamic Governance; Constitution, Consultation and Consent.


Has Modernity Failed The Muslim World?, Muqtedar Khan Oct 2014

Has Modernity Failed The Muslim World?, Muqtedar Khan

Muqtedar Khan

Modernity had come to the Muslim World. But it did not deliver. There is no stability, no freedom, no real democracy and no earned prosperity and no scientific vitality in the Muslim World. Perhaps rather than continuing to ask the old question is Islam compatible with modernity, we need to ask has modernity failed Muslims.


How Secular Should Democracy Be? A Cross-Disciplinary Study Of Catholicism And Islam In Promoting Public Reason, David Ingram, David Ingram Oct 2014

How Secular Should Democracy Be? A Cross-Disciplinary Study Of Catholicism And Islam In Promoting Public Reason, David Ingram, David Ingram

Philosophy: Faculty Publications and Other Works

I argue that the same factors (strategic and principled) that motivated Catholicism to champion liberal democracy are the same that motivate 21st Century Islam to do the same. I defend this claim by linking political liberalism to democratic secularism. Distinguishing institutional, political, and epistemic dimensions of democratic secularism, I show that moderate forms of political and epistemic secularism are most conducive to fostering the kind of public reasoning essential to democratic legitimacy. This demonstration draws upon the ambivalent impact of Indonesia’s Islamic parties in advancing universal social justice aims as against more sectarian policies.


History In The Making: Tunisia's Revolution, Nathaniel Greenberg May 2014

History In The Making: Tunisia's Revolution, Nathaniel Greenberg

Nathaniel Greenberg

ON THE NIGHT of January 24, 2011, I sat smoking shisha and sipping tea at a coffee shop in the downtown Cairo neighborhood of Lazoghly, just blocks from Tahrir Square. The Tunisian revolution had reached a crescendo, but there was little talk of it in this largely working-class neighborhood. With rumors spreading that protests were planned for the coming day, I asked some of the regulars if they thought Egypt could go the way of Tunisia. It was a laughable query. Egypt was too divided, they said, Mubarak too powerful. The following day seemed to confirm their skepticism. No one ...


The Specter Of Intolerance: Understanding Religious Violence In Pakistan, Syeda Haider May 2014

The Specter Of Intolerance: Understanding Religious Violence In Pakistan, Syeda Haider

Honors Scholar Theses

The role of religion in Pakistani political and civil life has had a defining role in the political development of the nation. The country is now a breeding ground for religious extremism, with militant groups conducting brutal attacks against the Shia, Ahmedi, Christian and Hindu communities of Pakistan. There have been few explanations attempting to describe the problem of religious violence domestically, within Pakistan’s borders towards Pakistani citizens. This essay examines how, despite Pakistan’s initial conception as a secular state, the country has become haunted by intense religious violence. It links the lack of consensus around national identity ...


The Right To Choose: Women's Political Activity In Islamic States, Emily A. Gibson Jan 2014

The Right To Choose: Women's Political Activity In Islamic States, Emily A. Gibson

Global Tides

The past fifteen to twenty years have seen a significant shift in focus to the Middle East-North Africa (MENA) region as well as other primarily Islamic regions and countries, including Indonesia. Much of Western foreign policy has been allocated to tracking and stopping trans-national Islamic terrorist networks such as Al-Qaeda and Al-Shabaab, and working with the governments of the countries throughout which these groups operate. Despite what popular culture may portray, those who study Islam and its adherents have come to recognize that these terrorist groups represent a severe minority of what is often a thoughtful and peaceful faith. However ...