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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Teaching, Practicing, And Performing Deliberative Democracy In The Classroom, Hayley J. Cole Oct 2013

Teaching, Practicing, And Performing Deliberative Democracy In The Classroom, Hayley J. Cole

Journal of Public Deliberation

Inspired by the Citizens Initiative Review Process in Oregon, Healthy Democracy, and the Living Voters Guide, this paper proposes that undergraduate educators should teach, practice, and perform deliberative democracy in the classroom. This paper will identify deliberation as a tool for resolving difficulties in current democratic practices and propose a specific classroom activity to teach deliberative skills. The sample undergraduate activity involves student research, local political leaders coming to speak and answer questions, and in-class deliberations. Using survey data collected from the students/participants, it was found that the activity had positive learning outcomes for students. Students reported feeling more ...


Contemporary Trends Of Deliberative Research: Synthesizing A New Study Agenda, Simon Beste Oct 2013

Contemporary Trends Of Deliberative Research: Synthesizing A New Study Agenda, Simon Beste

Journal of Public Deliberation

Deliberation is among the most widely acknowledged figures of thought in social theory. Taking the growing interest in the research conducted around deliberative democracy as an initial position, this paper seeks to provide an overview of recent predispositions and paradigm shifts of approaches taken towards the analysis of real-world discourses. Therefore, as a first step three different – nevertheless correlating – trends of deliberative research are identified: (1) an “empirical turn” and an effort to test and “falsify” assumptions of deliberative theories, (2) the consideration of certain epistemic dimensions of deliberative democracy and (3) the conceptual opening towards not fully rationalizable modes ...