Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Denmark Vesey’S Revolt: The Slave Plot That Lit A Fuse To Fort Sumter, John Lofton, Peter C. Hoffer Oct 2013

Denmark Vesey’S Revolt: The Slave Plot That Lit A Fuse To Fort Sumter, John Lofton, Peter C. Hoffer

American Abolitionism and Antislavery

New edition of a classic social history

In 1822, Denmark Vesey was found guilty of plotting an insurrection—what would have been the biggest slave uprising in U.S. history. A free man of color, he was hanged along with 34 other African Americans in Charleston, South Carolina, in what historians agree was probably the largest civil execution in U.S. history. At the time of Vesey’s conviction, Charleston was America’s chief slave port and one of its most racially tense cities. Whites were outnumbered by slaves three to one, and they were haunted by memories of the ...


Saving America: Religion And The Watergate Affair, David E. Settje Jun 2013

Saving America: Religion And The Watergate Affair, David E. Settje

Annual Conference on Information and Religion

This paper examines the intersection of religion and information delivery in the early 1970s, specifically regarding how Christian denominations reacted to the Watergate Scandal during Richard M. Nixon’s presidency. As church bodies determined to voice their opinions about the controversy swirling in the American political system, they first grappled with how best to communicate to a large audience, which included first, their lay constituencies, next their leadership networks and clergy, and finally the larger American public. Understanding how they engaged in this communication at that time can assist scholars today who study the past and want to examine it ...


Buried In The Sands Of The Ogaden: The United States, The Horn Of Africa, And The Demise Of Détente, Louise P. Woodroofe May 2013

Buried In The Sands Of The Ogaden: The United States, The Horn Of Africa, And The Demise Of Détente, Louise P. Woodroofe

New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations

How the Cold War came to Africa—and everybody lost

When the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the Soviet Union and United States faltered during the administration of Jimmy Carter, National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski claimed that “SALT lies buried in the sands of the Ogaden.” How did superpower détente survive Vietnam but stumble in the Horn of Africa? Historian Louise Woodroofe takes Brzezinski’s claim as a starting point to analyze superpower relations during the 1970s, and in so doing she reveals how conflict in East Africa became a critical turning point in the ongoing Cold War battle ...