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Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2013

Sociology

Selected Works

Banking and Finance

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Neoliberalism And The Law: How Historical Materialism Can Illuminate Recent Governmental And Judicial Decision Making, Justin Schwartz Jan 2013

Neoliberalism And The Law: How Historical Materialism Can Illuminate Recent Governmental And Judicial Decision Making, Justin Schwartz

Justin Schwartz

Neoliberalism can be understood as the deregulation of the economy from political control by deliberate action or inaction of the state. As such it is both constituted by the law and deeply affects it. I show how the methods of historical materialism can illuminate this phenomenon in all three branches of the the U.S. government. Considering the example the global financial crisis of 2007-08 that began with the housing bubble developing from trade in unregulated and overvalued mortgage backed securities, I show how the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act, which established a firewall between commercial and investment banking, allowed ...


Global Adversarial Legalism: The Private Regulation Of Fdi As A Species Of Global Administrative Law, Ariel Meyerstein Jan 2013

Global Adversarial Legalism: The Private Regulation Of Fdi As A Species Of Global Administrative Law, Ariel Meyerstein

Ariel Meyerstein, JD, PhD

This article explores the theoretical paradigm I refer to as “global adversarial legalism,” building on Robert Kagan’s description of the American legal system. Adversarial legalism has also been explained as a governance strategy deployed by the relatively weak central governance institutions of the European Union as a means of spreading EU law. It usefully captures the fragmented political authority and relatively weak hierarchical control of the global governance, or lack thereof, of foreign direct investment.

One facet of this global adversarial legalism, already much debated, is the concern that investment arbitration tribunals exercise an overly broad and perhaps illegitimate ...