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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Religiosity, Secularism, And Social Health: A Research Note, Thomas S. Mach, Gerson Moreno-Riano, Mark Caleb Smith Nov 2013

Religiosity, Secularism, And Social Health: A Research Note, Thomas S. Mach, Gerson Moreno-Riano, Mark Caleb Smith

Mark Caleb Smith, Ph.D.

This article is a research note addressing various theoretical and methodological issues in the measurement and analysis of religiosity and secularism and their relationship to quantifiable measures of social health in advanced and prosperous democracies. Particular attention is given to cross-national frameworks for studying religiosity and secularism as well as to the conceptualization and statistical analysis of these notions for research design. Various procedural suggestions regarding the use of comparative frameworks are presented to assist in the development and implementation of future studies gauging the impact of worldview commitments upon societal wellbeing.


Elephants, Donkeys, And American Politics, David L. Rich Nov 2013

Elephants, Donkeys, And American Politics, David L. Rich

David L. Rich, D.P.A.

No abstract provided.


Good News For America's Families, Robert G. Parr Nov 2013

Good News For America's Families, Robert G. Parr

Robert G. Parr, Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


Does China Have A Foreign Policy, Zheng Wang Mar 2013

Does China Have A Foreign Policy, Zheng Wang

Zheng Wang

No abstract provided.


Not Rising, But Rejuvenating: The “Chinese Dream”, Zheng Wang Feb 2013

Not Rising, But Rejuvenating: The “Chinese Dream”, Zheng Wang

Zheng Wang

No abstract provided.


Deterring The ‘Boat People’: Explaining The Australian Government's People Swap Response To Asylum Seekers, Jaffa Mckenzie, Reza Hasmath Dec 2012

Deterring The ‘Boat People’: Explaining The Australian Government's People Swap Response To Asylum Seekers, Jaffa Mckenzie, Reza Hasmath

Reza Hasmath

This article examines why Australia has taken a tough stance on ‘boat people’, through an analysis of the Malaysian People Swap response. The findings support the view that Australia’s asylum seeker policy agenda is driven by populism, wedge politics and a culture of control. The article further argues that these political pressures, in sum, hold numerous negative implications for the tone of Australia’s political debate, the quality of policy formulation, as well as for asylum seekers and refugees themselves.