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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Security Cooperation Poorly Defined, Nathan L. Fenell Dec 2011

Security Cooperation Poorly Defined, Nathan L. Fenell

Master's Theses

Security cooperation is a vital component to the national security of the United States. Despite this fact, insufficient military or academic attention has been applied to the subject. The academic and professional void created by this inattention has led academic, journalistic, and military professionals to misuse the term security cooperation, and stray from its doctrinal description as defined by the Department of Defense Dictionary and Associated Military Terms. The academic rigor required to properly express the concept of security cooperation as a peace-time strategy has been absent from both the Department of Defense, and the Department of State, and has ...


Religious Soft Power As Accountability Mechanism For Power In World Politics, Sherrie Steiner Nov 2011

Religious Soft Power As Accountability Mechanism For Power In World Politics, Sherrie Steiner

Sherrie M Steiner

This case study of the Interfaith Leaders’ Summit(s) from 2005-2010 expands the concept of ‘soft power’ as an accountability mechanism to include religious soft power. The Interfaith Leaders exercise public reputational and peer accountability in relation to the G8/G20 leaders. The value of the dialogue process is not contingent upon political leader responsiveness. The significance of the religious accountability mechanism is ascertained by using a complex theoretical standard for assessing the legitimacy of global governance institutions against which observations are then gauged. The InterFaith Dialogue Mechanism shows increasing compliance with the complex standard between 2005 and 2010. The ...


Sell Unipolarity? The Future Of An Overvalued Concept, Jeffrey W. Legro Sep 2011

Sell Unipolarity? The Future Of An Overvalued Concept, Jeffrey W. Legro

Political Science Faculty Publications

For at least the past thirty years, scholarship on international relations has been bewitched by a simple proposition: the polarity of the international system is a central cause of great power strategies and politics. The number of "poles" (dominant countries) in the system is like an invisible fence that shapes states as if they were dogs with electronic collars or a Skinner box that conditions national "rats." States can choose to ignore the fence or box, but if they do, they must pay the consequences. The polarity of the international system as defined by the number of great powers - involving ...


From Ankara To Jerusalem: An Analysis Of The Decline In Turkish-Israeli Relations, Kama Sacajiu Jun 2011

From Ankara To Jerusalem: An Analysis Of The Decline In Turkish-Israeli Relations, Kama Sacajiu

Honors Theses

Turkey and Israel had been strong allies in the Middle East, however in recent years, these relations have turned sour. Turkey was the first predominantly Muslim country to recognize the state of Israel upon its creation in 1948. However, Present day Turkey has gone as far as to pull its ambassador from Tel Aviv. The importance and implication of the decline in relations between Turkey and Israel will be explained in the following chapters. The examination of Turkish foreign policy, and specifically a history of its relations with Israel, gives a basis to explain the changes that occurred with their ...


Building An Asia-Pacific Security Community: A Role For Australia?, Jonathan K. Chen May 2011

Building An Asia-Pacific Security Community: A Role For Australia?, Jonathan K. Chen

Political Science Honors Projects

Australia’s foreign policy has recently shifted from great-power dependency towards self-reliance in the Asia-Pacific. In light of this shift, there have been calls for the creation of a regional security community. This project looks at two existing security communities, the OSCE and ASEAN, to ascertain the necessary conditions for building a security community. From there, I examine whether or not these conditions exist in the Asia-Pacific, and investigate Australia’s ability to produce the remaining conditions. I conclude that Australia does not have the diplomatic power to overcome regional competition, and that rivalries amongst regional powers mitigate against the ...


Booms And Busts: Russia And Its Oil, 1970 To 2011 And Beyond, Cliff Gaddy Apr 2011

Booms And Busts: Russia And Its Oil, 1970 To 2011 And Beyond, Cliff Gaddy

Lectures/Events (BMW)

For 40 years Russia’s domestic economic and political development and its foreign policy ambitions have been driven by the varying fortunes of its oil and gas wealth. The story continues to play out today, with crucial global consequences. Russia remains the world’s largest producer of oil and gas. It holds the third largest foreign exchange reserves in the world. Understanding the role of Russia’s energy wealth is key to understanding what role the country may play in world energy security and geopolitics in the years ahead.


Uncoiling The Modern Sino-American Relationship, Amanda Mcatee Apr 2011

Uncoiling The Modern Sino-American Relationship, Amanda Mcatee

Psi Sigma Siren

For this particular paper I seek to qualify the true nature of the Sino-American relationship as it has developed over the last quarter of the twentieth century. To more fully appreciate the complex relationship that evolved between such seemingly antithetical nations, I will critically review both James Mann‘s About Face: A History of America’s Curious Relationship with China, From Nixon to Clinton and Margaret MacMillan‘s Nixon and Mao: The Week that Changed the World. This paper will specifically focus on evaluating the similarities and inconsistencies between Mann‘s and MacMillan‘s theses, elucidate the structural differences between ...


Conclusion: Strategy In A Murky World, Melvyn P. Leffler, Jeffrey W. Legro Apr 2011

Conclusion: Strategy In A Murky World, Melvyn P. Leffler, Jeffrey W. Legro

Political Science Faculty Publications

Making national strategy is a byzantine business in the best of times. When dramatic events happen, when the international arena is complex and changing, when threats and opportunities are uncertain, leaders struggle to understand and react effectively. The fall of the Berlin Wall and the attacks of 9/11 opened vistas that were unfamiliar and complicated. How did U.S. leaders manage those transitions?


Introduction: Navigating The Unknown, Melvyn P. Leffler, Jeffrey W. Legro Apr 2011

Introduction: Navigating The Unknown, Melvyn P. Leffler, Jeffrey W. Legro

Political Science Faculty Publications

On November 9, 1989, the Berlin Wall came down. Hardly anyone had foreseen this event. When President Ronald Reagan had challenged Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in June 1987 “to tear down this wall,” he never anticipated that Berliners themselves would have the opportunity and courage to bring about such dramatic change. We now know that the Wall came down as a result of accidental circumstances, a series of mistaken statements and understandings among officials of the German Democratic Republic. No one had planned for this to happen, and no one had plans to deal with a new landscape that might ...


Rising Asian Powers And Changing Global Governance, Ann Florini Mar 2011

Rising Asian Powers And Changing Global Governance, Ann Florini

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

International Relations (IR) scholarship is directly in the path of two simultaneous tidal waves. The first is the rise of China and India in the traditional IR terms of military and economic power. The second is the expanding nature of what IR scholarship needs to address, as global integration transforms the nature of the issues to be addressed and numerous trends expand the number and types of relevant actors. Neither theory nor practice is yet coping well with the profound implications of these fundamental changes. Investigating what kind of a world order might emerge from these two simultaneous tsunamis will ...


Novi Institucionalizam I Međunarodni Odnosi: Korak Napred, Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker Jan 2011

Novi Institucionalizam I Međunarodni Odnosi: Korak Napred, Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker

Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker

Revolucija koju je šezdesetih godina prošlog veka doneo biheviorizam, i koja je u potpunosti prožela društvene nauke, posebno u oblasti političkih nauka i sociologije, dovela je do nezainteresovanosti za proučavanje institucija i njihove strukture. Osamdesetih godina javio se, pak, novi pokret u društvenim naukama, pokret koji je ukazao na značaj centralnosti institucionalne analize u proučavanju politike i društva, i obnovio izučavanje institucija kao ključne varijable. Nazvan Novi institucionalizam, ovaj pokret u velikoj meri uticao je na usmerenje istraživanja u političkim naukama i sociologiji. Nažalost, mnogi teoretičari i praktičari međunarodnih odnosa su ignorisali Novi institucionalizam, iako je on došao do novih ...


Divided Government And Congressional Foreign Policy A Case Study Of The Post-World War Ii Era In American Government, David Eric Feinman Jan 2011

Divided Government And Congressional Foreign Policy A Case Study Of The Post-World War Ii Era In American Government, David Eric Feinman

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the executive and legislative branches of American federal government, during periods within which these two branches are led by different political parties, to discover whether the legislative branch attempts to independently legislate and enact foreign policy by using “the power of the purse” to either appropriate in support of or refuse to appropriate in opposition to military engagement abroad. The methodology for this research includes the analysis and comparison of certain variables, including public opinion, budgetary constraints, and the relative majority of the party that holds power in one ...