Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Paradox Lost: Explaining Cross-National Variation In Case Volume At The European Court Of Human Rights, Veronica S. Armendariz Dec 2011

Paradox Lost: Explaining Cross-National Variation In Case Volume At The European Court Of Human Rights, Veronica S. Armendariz

Political Science Theses

Existing research on states and human rights focuses primarily on international treaty ratification, post-treaty rating systems, and ad hoc reports on adherence in individual countries. Additionally, the literature is characterized by disproportionate attention to certain rights to the neglect of others, thereby painting an incomplete and potentially inaccurate picture of a state’s practice and implementation of human rights. Consequently, the extant literature too frequently disregards key domestic and international factors as determinants of cross-national variation in the implementation and protection of human rights, and it instead generates paradoxical claims about human rights and state behavior. With Europe as its ...


The Priming Effects Of Polling Location On Ballot Initiative Voting Decisions, Jeffrey M. Glas Aug 2011

The Priming Effects Of Polling Location On Ballot Initiative Voting Decisions, Jeffrey M. Glas

Political Science Theses

Do the physical settings in which a voter casts their ballot affect their vote choices? Every state uses a variety of polling locations for the administration of election: churches, schools, libraries, fire stations, and etcetera. The literature on priming effects and voting is massive, but very little research examines the impact of the venue in which a ballot is cast has on voters’ decisions. In this study I argue that polling venues situated on church, school, or veteran’s association property influences the proportion of votes cast in favor of ballot measures related to each institution. I test these hypotheses ...


Living In The "Age Of Accountability": How Co-Decision Empowers The European Parliament In The Design Of Eu Agencies, Patrick C. Kenard May 2011

Living In The "Age Of Accountability": How Co-Decision Empowers The European Parliament In The Design Of Eu Agencies, Patrick C. Kenard

Political Science Theses

Bátora alleges that political accountability has been “almost entirely overlooked” (2010, 2) in studies of the European External Action Service. An examination of the subject that extends previous studies on agency design, the co-decision procedure, the “democratic deficit,” and European Union foreign policy would resolve the neglect. As a result, the study derives a hypothesis from an established theory of bureaucratic structure. Findings suggest that during the design of EU agencies co-decision power improves the ability of the European Parliament to institutionalize methods of accountability to it.