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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Barking At The Big Dogs: South Africa's Foreign Policy Towards The Middle East, Eduard Jordaan Aug 2008

Barking At The Big Dogs: South Africa's Foreign Policy Towards The Middle East, Eduard Jordaan

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

This article places South Africa's foreign policy towards the Middle East in the context of the country's general foreign policy. South Africa is classified as a middle power, given its penCHANt for international 'bridge-building' and multilateralism. With regard to the Middle East, South Africa has frequently offered itself as a mediator in the region's various conflicts and continues to do so. However, the argument proposed here is that there is an 'anti-imperialist' strain in South Africa's foreign policy that renders it unlikely to be regarded as an impartial broker in the various Middle East conflicts. South ...


Jimmy Carter's Foreign Policy: The Battle For Power And Principle, Frances M. Jacobson Jul 2008

Jimmy Carter's Foreign Policy: The Battle For Power And Principle, Frances M. Jacobson

Graduate Program in International Studies Theses & Dissertations

Evaluating the foreign policies of presidents while they are in office or shortly after their tenure ends can sometimes lead to conclusions that prove to be unsound in the future. The case of Harry Truman exemplifies this. When he left office in 1952 his approval rating was in the 20 percentile range. Yet, he set the tone and direction of United States foreign policy that led eventually to the successful conclusion of the Cold War. The foreign policy of President Jimmy Carter was also generally viewed as a failure by many scholars in the field, both during his time in ...


South Africa And The Arab World: Facing Common Challenges, Marcus Noland, Howard Pack Mar 2008

South Africa And The Arab World: Facing Common Challenges, Marcus Noland, Howard Pack

Marcus Noland

Today the Arab countries of the Middle East face a challenge familiar to all South Africans: to create jobs for the large cohort of young people reaching working age. Over the next decade or so, the region may experience population growth of 150 million people—the equivalent of adding two Egypts (table 1). In demographic terms, the task is similar to that facing South Africa—only larger. Rising labor force participation by women only increases the pressure. The task is immense, and the stakes are high.


U.S. Foreign Policy And Israel’S Qualitative Military Edge: The Need For A Common Vision, William Wunderle, Andre Briere Jan 2008

U.S. Foreign Policy And Israel’S Qualitative Military Edge: The Need For A Common Vision, William Wunderle, Andre Briere

William Wunderle

The U.S. commitment to maintain Israel's qualitative military edge (QME) -- that is, the technological, tactical, and other advantages that allow it to deter numerically superior adversaries -- is a longstanding tradition that every president since Lyndon Johnson has reiterated. Today, however, Israel's relations with Arab countries are more complicated, and some moderate Arab states have even become strategically aligned with Israel due to Iran's growing regional ambitions and nuclear activities. How does this new regional calculus affect American military aid to both Israel and Arab states? And how can Washington advance U.S. strategic needs in the ...


Arab Economies At A Tipping Point, Marcus Noland, Howard Pack Jan 2008

Arab Economies At A Tipping Point, Marcus Noland, Howard Pack

Marcus Noland

The Arab world is experiencing an economic boom of historic proportions. The tiny Persian Gulf emirate of Dubai is emblematic. Boasting the world's only seven-star hotel, its massive land reclamation project, allegedly the only man-made structure visible from the moon, is whimsically creating parcels shaped like continents and palm trees. With oil hovering above $90 a barrel and the Egyptian stock market up 1,800 percent in the last five years, one might ask what problems World Bank President Robert Zoellick perceives that would justify making the economic revitalization of the Arab world one of the cornerstones of his ...


The East Asian Industrial Policy Experience: Implications For The Middle East, Marcus Noland, Howard Pack Jan 2008

The East Asian Industrial Policy Experience: Implications For The Middle East, Marcus Noland, Howard Pack

Marcus Noland

Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan are regarded as primary examples of countries that have derived great benefits from increasing integration with the international economy, without surrendering national autonomy in the economic or cultural spheres, by pursuing decidedly nonneutral policies with respect to the promotion of specific sectors and activities. This working paper addresses a series of questions in an attempt to assess the relevance of their experiences for the contemporary Middle East: Was industrial policy a major source of growth in these three economies? Can these outcomes be duplicated in the Middle East today, or do special circumstances or changes ...


Factors Driving Turkish Foreign Policy, Betul Dicle Jan 2008

Factors Driving Turkish Foreign Policy, Betul Dicle

LSU Master's Theses

Evaluation of Turkish foreign policy events suggests that both external and domestic factors have affected its determination. While a consistent pattern in foreign policy has been observed since Ottoman times, the 20th century has led to substantial challenges. Long-established Turkish foreign policy, based exclusively on external factors, was reshaped to include domestic factors as well. With the new Republic in 1923, the process of reshaping foreign policy, based on Western values, has started. The end of the Cold War started a new era in which domestic factors gained predominance. The aim of this study is to evaluate the factors that ...