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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Next Door They Have Regulation, But Not Here …: Assessing The Opinions Of Actors In The Opaque World Of Unregulated Lobbying, John Hogan Dec 2008

Next Door They Have Regulation, But Not Here …: Assessing The Opinions Of Actors In The Opaque World Of Unregulated Lobbying, John Hogan

Articles

The lobbying of government by various interests is regarded as central to the democratic process. Deliberative democratic theorists tell us that the regulation of lobbying has a positive effect on political systems, and the behaviour of those within them. Yet, only a small number of democracies have implemented legislation regulating lobbyists’ activities. Even within these countries, certain jurisdictions still have not enacted lobbying regulations. Here we examine the attitudes of actors in these unregulated provinces, states and institutions towards the idea of lobbying legislation. This ensures that in the broader context the actors we deal with have knowledge of lobbying ...


A Secure Border: In Canada Religion & Politics Don't Mix, Michael W. Higgins Nov 2008

A Secure Border: In Canada Religion & Politics Don't Mix, Michael W. Higgins

Mission and Catholic Identity Publications

The article focuses on the separation of religion and politics in Canada. It cites that Canadian politicians are collectively nervous about introducing religious issues in the political arena. It notes that reelected Prime Minister Stephen Harper has an affirmed intellectual attachment to religion. It states that religion, particularly Catholicism, surfaced at several points during the election, around the editorial table, or in caucus.


A 'Strategic' Way To Vote 'Smart', Joanna Santa-Barbara, Erika Simpson Oct 2008

A 'Strategic' Way To Vote 'Smart', Joanna Santa-Barbara, Erika Simpson

Political Science Publications

No abstract provided.


Canada's Engagement With Democracies In The Americas, Maxwell A. Cameron, Catherine Hecht Oct 2008

Canada's Engagement With Democracies In The Americas, Maxwell A. Cameron, Catherine Hecht

Maxwell Cameron

Canada’s engagement with Latin America over the past two decades was predicated on three inter-related assumptions: that the region was becoming more democratic, that it had embraced markets, and that, as a result, it was reasonable to expect a more cooperative and pragmatic tone in inter-American affairs. These assumptions have proven faulty. Although democracy remains the preferred system of government, many voters are dissatisfied with their elected governments; the record of progress in reducing poverty and inequality has also been disappointing; finally, the international politics of the region have become more fraught. The current Canadian “re-engagement” with the region ...


Proportionality In The Criminal Law: The Differing American Versus Canadian Approaches To Punishment, Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker Jan 2008

Proportionality In The Criminal Law: The Differing American Versus Canadian Approaches To Punishment, Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker

Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker

The focus of this Article shall be upon the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution and s. 12 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, both of which prohibit “cruel and unusual punishment”; and their effect on mandatory criminal sentencing (via penal statute) in the two countries. The Article shall begin by briefly explain the differences between the jurisdictional application of criminal justice in the United States and Canada. The Article will next present and explain the American Eighth Amendment approach to the constitutionality of mandatory criminal sentencing and contrast this to the Canadian s. 12 approach to ...


Research In The Biotech Age: Can Informational Privacy Compete?, Wilhelm Peekhaus Jan 2008

Research In The Biotech Age: Can Informational Privacy Compete?, Wilhelm Peekhaus

Wilhelm Peekhaus

This paper examines the privacy of personal medical information in the health research context. Arguing that biomedical research in Canada has been caught up in the government’s broader neo-liberal policy agenda that has positioned biotechnology as a strategic driver of economic growth, the author discusses the tension between informational privacy and the need for medical information for research purposes. Consideration is given to the debate about whether privacy for medical information serves or hinders the ‘public good’ in respect of medical research, and to discussions of informed consent as an element of ‘fair information practices’ designed to safeguard the ...


Personal Health Information In Canada: A Comparison Of Citizen Expectations And Legislation, Wilhelm Peekhaus Jan 2008

Personal Health Information In Canada: A Comparison Of Citizen Expectations And Legislation, Wilhelm Peekhaus

Wilhelm Peekhaus

This paper explores whether the Canadian legislative protections in place to safeguard medical privacy meet the expectations of Canadians. An overview of current governance systems designed to protect the privacy of personal health information at both the federal and provincial levels is first presented. This is followed by an empirical analysis of the results of a public opinion survey conducted to determine Canadian attitudes about medical privacy, particularly genetic privacy. The analysis highlights areas where legislation and public opinion converge and diverge.


The Honest Broker? Canada's Role In Haitian Development, Michele Zebich-Knos Jan 2008

The Honest Broker? Canada's Role In Haitian Development, Michele Zebich-Knos

Faculty Publications

Since the early 1990s Canada has played a key role in Haiti’s development process. The article explores whether Canada’s foreign policy is becoming more reliant on military-assisted solutions, including peacekeeping, as a way to solve Haiti’s internal problems and achieve good governance. The article also examines the Canadian concepts called “Responsibility to Protect, React and Rebuild” which are linked to humanitarian intervention, and their implication for Haitian sovereignty. The conclusion cautions against an overly ambitious Canadian development policy for Haiti which has little chance of success.


Dissolving The Diaspora: Dialogical Practice In The Development Of Deep Multiculturalism, Paul W. Nesbitt-Larking Dec 2007

Dissolving The Diaspora: Dialogical Practice In The Development Of Deep Multiculturalism, Paul W. Nesbitt-Larking

Paul W Nesbitt-Larking

This article is an exposition of deep or critical multiculturalism that is grounded in a mutually respectful dialogue. Such multiculturalism names historical oppressions, recognizes the structural causes of injustice and inequality, and is profoundly open to cultural critique, challenge and change. In order to promote such a multicultural practice, the article makes the case for a dialogical politics of deep and mutual respect in which ethno‐religious sensibilities are validated and welcomed in their rich diversity. In doing so, the article draws upon the authorʼs empirical research on the Muslim minority in contemporary Canada.


Canada And Russia In The North Pole: Cooperation, Conflict, And Canadian Identity In The Interpretation Of The Arctic Region, Nick J. Sciullo Dec 2007

Canada And Russia In The North Pole: Cooperation, Conflict, And Canadian Identity In The Interpretation Of The Arctic Region, Nick J. Sciullo

Nick J. Sciullo

The Arctic debate touches on a number of important international issues: national security, energy exploration and policy, environmental concerns, and maritime commerce are but a few. The North Pole, the Arctic more generally, is becoming increasingly important to a number of international actors as climate change causes ice to melt and the Arctic's waters become increasingly navigable. The pressure to lay claim to the Canadian North is intense, as countries clamor for the right to firmly plant their flags and lay the foundations for their military bases and research facilities.

Canadians must confront threats to sovereignty that they have ...


The Centennial Of The Boundary Waters Treaty: A Century Of United States–Canadian Transboundary Water Management, Noah D. Hall Dec 2007

The Centennial Of The Boundary Waters Treaty: A Century Of United States–Canadian Transboundary Water Management, Noah D. Hall

Noah D Hall

The Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909 has now provided the foundation for transboundary United States-Canadian water management for a century. During the one hundred years that the Boundary Waters Treaty has been in place, both the law and the world in which the law operates have changed dramatically. Some of the most relevant and significant changes have been several fold increases in population and thousand fold increases in gross domestic product in North America with correlating increased environmental impacts, the growth of international law and governance institutions, the emergence of modern environmentalism and the resulting creation of domestic and international ...