Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2008

American Politics

Series

Political patronage

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Temple Collection, 1715-1972 (Mss 55), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Aug 2008

Temple Collection, 1715-1972 (Mss 55), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 55. Correspondence, 1931-1970 (33 items), chiefly of William Montgomery Temple, originally of Bowling Green, Kentucky, an autograph collector; his collection of papers of Kentucky governors, 1805-1951 (50); other autograph letters, 1715-1941 (17); and articles about Bowling Green, etc., (23).


Predicting State Allocation Of Funds: The Case Of John Rowland And His Hometown Of Waterbury, Connecticut., Matthew Ciarleglio Aug 2008

Predicting State Allocation Of Funds: The Case Of John Rowland And His Hometown Of Waterbury, Connecticut., Matthew Ciarleglio

Honors Scholar Theses

This study attempts to analyze the underlying factors and motives influencing the allocation of discretionary state expenditures. The fact that some cities receive more money than other cities begs the question of what accounts for this variation. After framing the provision of state money within the theoretical framework of political patronage, a case study of Governor Rowland’s tenure in office and the accompanying expenditures to Connecticut’s 17 largest cities from 1995 to 2004 was conducted to evaluate whether a disproportionate amount of money was given to Rowland’s hometown of Waterbury, Connecticut. Besides employing a statistical analysis that ...


Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845 (Sc 1560), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jan 2008

Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845 (Sc 1560), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 1560. Copies of three letters written by Andrew Jackson. The first, 31 May 1817, concerns provisions of a treaty with the Chickasaw Indians. The second, 3 May 1829, relates to the appointment of a surgeon at a federal penitentiary. The third, 3 November 1832, requests consideration for his nephew, Samuel Donelson, who was visiting Philadelphia. Also, copy of first photograph of Abraham Lincoln as President.