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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

India: Grassroots Hiv/Aids Activism Growing, Manju Parikh Aug 2006

India: Grassroots Hiv/Aids Activism Growing, Manju Parikh

Political Science Faculty Publications

In the last ten years, we have seen frequent news reports on the spread of the HIV/AIDS virus in the Indian subcontinent, each one stressing the dire economic and social consequences if urgent attention is not paid to the problem. Although the Indian government has responded by adopting many policies and by establishing an organization — the National Aids Control Organization (NACO) — to deal specifically with HIV awareness, treatment for HIV infected individuals, and prevention of further spread of HIV/AIDS, many critics do not find these measures adequate.

The campaign to create awareness and check the spread of AIDS ...


Rethinking Symbolic Racism: Evidence Of Attribution Bias, Brad T. Gomez, J. Matthew Wilson Aug 2006

Rethinking Symbolic Racism: Evidence Of Attribution Bias, Brad T. Gomez, J. Matthew Wilson

Political Science Research

This paper demonstrates that cognitive tendencies related to political sophistication produce an attribution bias in the widely accepted symbolic racism scale. When this bias is controlled statistically, the effect of symbolic racism on racial policy attitudes is greatly diminished. Our theory posits that high sophisticates tend to make global/distal attributions, allowing them to associate racial inequality with broader sociopolitical causes. Less sophisticated individuals, conversely, tend to make local/proximal attributions, thus biasing them against ascribing responsibility systemically. Consequently, less sophisticated individuals tend to be classified as intolerant by the symbolic racism scale, even when controlling for factors such as ...


Education In A Federal System: A Case-Study Of Belgium, Caroline Varin Apr 2006

Education In A Federal System: A Case-Study Of Belgium, Caroline Varin

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

The administration of primary and secondary education in Belgium is divided among the three federal regions and has yielded very different results in student performances, particularly in Flanders and Wallonia/Bruxelles-Capitale: the Flemings are consistently stronger in subjects such as languages and mathematics and there are fewer students failing school in Flemish areas than in the Francophone regions (PISA 2000, 2003). Different educational systems across ethnic lines can increase social and economic inequality. In a federal country such as Belgium with pre-existing ethnic tensions, this inequality can lead to political instability. This paper investigates the disparities in education within the ...


Revisiting The Iron Cage: New Insights In Institutions Theory From Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic And The Spirit Of Capitalism, Michael D. Grosack Mar 2006

Revisiting The Iron Cage: New Insights In Institutions Theory From Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic And The Spirit Of Capitalism, Michael D. Grosack

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

This thesis reinterprets Max Weber’s The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism using contemporary economic institutions theory as proposed by Douglass North in Institutions, Institutional Change, and Economic Performance. It shows that contrary to the accusations of his critics, Weber provides a clear mechanism for historical change which emphasizes human perceptions and changing costs. This thesis argues that Weber's approach can serve as a model for understanding other periods of historical change. This reinterpretation is used to refute Weber’s critics in explaining the continued—and widely unacknowledged—importance of The Protestant Ethic in the developing field ...


Artificially Sweetened: An Analysis Of The United States Sugar Program, Adam H. Dean Mar 2006

Artificially Sweetened: An Analysis Of The United States Sugar Program, Adam H. Dean

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

By limiting imports of sugar into the United States, the United States Department of Agriculture maintains a price floor for domestic sugar producers that has traditionally been double the price of sugar on the international market. Operating at an annual cost of two billion dollars, the US sugar program has deleterious effects for both US consumers and foreign producers, many of which live in developing countries. By forcing developing countries out of the US market, the US sugar program costs countries in the third world millions of dollars each year in lost trade and development opportunities. Although agricultural trade liberalization ...


2006 Apsa Teaching And Learning Conference Track Summaries, Gordon Babst, Denise Degarmo, Chris Harth, Bob Reinalda, Amy Cabrera Rasmussen, Reilly Hirst, Anas Malik, Ange-Marie Hancock Jan 2006

2006 Apsa Teaching And Learning Conference Track Summaries, Gordon Babst, Denise Degarmo, Chris Harth, Bob Reinalda, Amy Cabrera Rasmussen, Reilly Hirst, Anas Malik, Ange-Marie Hancock

Political Science Faculty Articles and Research

The 3rd Annual APSA Conference on Teaching and Learning in Political Science hosted over 300 participants in lively discussions of trends, techniques, and models in teaching in political science. Held in downtown Washington, D.C. on February 18-20, the Conference was organized as a workshop-based forum to develop models of teaching and learning as well as to discuss broad themes affecting political science education today. Joining the discussion, APSA President Ira Katznelson (Columbia University) and keynote speaker Thomas E. Cronin (Colorado College) shared their thoughts on teaching and learning in the discipline.


Is Suspension A Political Question, Amanda L. Tyler Jan 2006

Is Suspension A Political Question, Amanda L. Tyler

Faculty Scholarship

The article focuses on the Suspension Clause of the U.S. Constitution being a political issue. It says that once suspension is viewed as a nonjusticiable political question, it would turn as a subject on which most of the restraints imposed by the Constitution would not be subjected to judicial enforcement. It is claimed that such thought should be denied because it is at odds of writ of habeas corpus heritage and would only complicate the separation of powers and the institution of judicial reviews.