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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Albert Camus's Meditative Ascent: A Search For Foundations In The Plague, Brian James Blanchard Jan 2006

Albert Camus's Meditative Ascent: A Search For Foundations In The Plague, Brian James Blanchard

LSU Master's Theses

Albert Camus's concept of absurdity states that human existence is fundamentally chaotic and meaningless. Despite this appraisal of existence, Camus tirelessly campaigned for human rights at a time when many intellectuals ignored the atrocities perpetrated by ideological compatriots. Scholars admire Camus's courage and foresight, but few have attempted to systematically examine Camus's philosophical development of values. Eric Voegelin argues that Camus's writings take the form of a philosophical meditation in which Camus conducted an analysis of existence through the medium of fictional creation. This meditation, which Voegelin likens to a Platonic periagoge, allowed Camus to establish ...


Assessing The Role Of Institutions In Ensuring Environmental Performance: A Cross-National Study Of Un Framework Convention On Climate Change, Swetasree Ghosh Roy Jan 2006

Assessing The Role Of Institutions In Ensuring Environmental Performance: A Cross-National Study Of Un Framework Convention On Climate Change, Swetasree Ghosh Roy

LSU Master's Theses

Although past research has emphasized the importance of international environmental agreements in redressing environmental degradation, systematic assessments of regime effects are missing. The central focus of this paper is assessing the effectiveness of international environmental agreements: do international environmental agreements actually improve environmental quality? Most of the research in the field of environmental protection has focused on the role of economic development and the political system. Several studies have found that the relationship between a countries wealth and some pollutants follow an inverted U-shaped curve, popularly known in the literature as the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC). Again scholars have also ...


The Ideology Of Free Trade And The Cuba Exception, Michael C. Schena Jan 2006

The Ideology Of Free Trade And The Cuba Exception, Michael C. Schena

LSU Master's Theses

This paper examines ideology and congressional roll call voting in the post-Cold War period (1991-2005) on free trade and trade policy with Cuba. While members with a more conservative ideology are found, as expected, to be supporters of free trade generally, there remains a curious disconnect between this general support for free trade and the opposition to liberalization of trade with Cuba. Yet despite this perceived inconsistency, ideology remains consistent on both, thus we seek to test this exception to conservative support for liberalization. A combination of factors is at play to which make Cuba a special case in the ...


The Antipodes: On Rebellion, Michael Scott Robinson Jan 2006

The Antipodes: On Rebellion, Michael Scott Robinson

LSU Master's Theses

This essay argues that the term rebellion applies to two similar but distinguishable experiences representative of the limits to human action and capacity. The political rebel is a man who rebels against an oppressive political regime. Opposing him is the metaphysical rebel whose action is inspired by a grievance against the nature of existence generally, as a human being, which he has interpreted to be oppressive. These contradicting inspirations are matched by juxtaposing consequences, exemplified through a literary analysis of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novels, and a historical analysis of Václav Havel and the Velvet Revolution.


Government Growth In Latin America, Carlos Eduardo Costa Jan 2006

Government Growth In Latin America, Carlos Eduardo Costa

LSU Master's Theses

The scope of government spending has gained significant attention in comparative politics. Disaggregate level data has allowed researchers to examine the impact of electoral rules and party fragmentation on the nature of government spending. Findings supported by large-N empirical tests suggest that fragmented polities are more likely to observe a shift in government expenditures: away from expenditures on public goods and in the direction of transfers and subsidies. In this paper, I test the applicability of these findings to Latin America. Using empirical evidence based on 13 Latin American countries over a 17 year period, the findings of this paper ...


A Multivariate Analysis Of Economic Reform In Latin America, 1980-1995, Ashley Dyan Ross Jan 2006

A Multivariate Analysis Of Economic Reform In Latin America, 1980-1995, Ashley Dyan Ross

LSU Master's Theses

The current literature on economic reform is fragmented and lacks a cohesive theoretical framework to fully explain the politics of neoliberal reform adoption. The multiple perspectives presented in the literature, including institutional, pluralist, macroeconomic, international pressures, and policy networks, create an incoherent explanation of economic liberalization. In an effort to more completely account for the political dynamics of the economic reform process, my analysis incorporates the primary variables supported by the literature on neoliberal reform within an informal institutions framework. My primary variable of interest is policy networks, and I support this with the theory of informal institutions while considering ...


Federalism, Checks And The Welfare State: A Cross National Analysis, Amanda Louise Beal Jan 2006

Federalism, Checks And The Welfare State: A Cross National Analysis, Amanda Louise Beal

LSU Master's Theses

It is often asserted in the institutional literature that there is a trade-off between effective and efficient government. Effective government is often stipulated to be more representative, while efficient government is considered superior at passing legislation. This analysis critiques Arend Lijphart's theory that consensus democracies are more representative, and therefore, result in "kinder, gentler" democracies with more encompassing social policies. I hypothesize that more representative government - operationalized as having higher levels of fractionalization within the legislature, more federalism and more checks within the system - is actually more effective at translating the median voter's preference for occupationally dependent or ...